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Ranking all 8 Superman movies from worst to best

Yep, we went there. Arguably the most divisive superhero movie ever made, Man of Steel is experimental, creative and brave.

From the thrilling opening – the greatest cinematic representation of Krypton ever filmed – to the goosebump-inducing final scene (“Welcome to the planet” indeed) Man of Steel gets so, so, so much right.

Unfortunately for its placement on this list, it also gets a couple of key things wrong. We’re not talking about the controversy surrounding the fact our hero – spoiler alert – kills Zod at the end; he does that in the comics and in Superman II, so we’re totally fine with that.

It’s the fact that, maybe, possibly, Superman and Zod do potentially throw themselves through one too many buildings in a bombastic finale. Though, actually, we like the fact that Superman – who’s still only just become a superhero, remember – struggles to defeat his enemy.

As an origin story, every element, from the narrative time-jumps to the emotional backstory, is full of surprises. Considering the fact this is a tale every audience member knew intimately before they bought a ticket, that’s actually pretty impressive.

And if the original Superman made you believe a man could fly, Man of Steel‘s astonishing early sky-bound sequences make you feel like you’re flying right along next to him.

2. Superman (1978)

Superman is an incredible film, creating the structure superhero cinema would stick to until Marvel was brave enough to tear up the rulebook with Iron Man. It’s got an astonishing score – as influential a piece of music as the Jaws theme. It’s got an iconic central performance, arguably the greatest superhero turn of all time.

But it’s not the best Superman film. As scene-setters go, it’s pretty unbeatable. But there’s no getting away from the fact it’s a flawed masterpiece – the Fortress of Solitude stuff is slow, Gene Hackman’s Lex Luthor is lots of fun but he never feels like a real threat to our hero, and then there’s that earth-spinningly silly time-travel finale, the superhero cinematic equivalent to “it was all a dream”.

We know it’s a comic-book movie, and men can’t really fly, but we need at least some internal logic to suspend our disbelief, and it’s almost impossible to ignore the fact that Superman never uses his time travel special move again – for good reason, it would suck the drama out of every future conflict. “Hey, it doesn’t matter what happens here, Superman can just spin the planet backwards and sort it out retrospectively! Yay!”

Still, these are tiny, tiny flaws – it’s still a so-very-close-to-perfect movie. We just happen to think the next film is the better Superman movie.

1. Superman II (1980)

Superman II is a stunning sequel, up with The Dark Knight in terms of adding complexity, coolness and a brilliantly delivered villain.

As with The Dark Knight, a villain teased in the first film takes centre stage. Unlike The Dark Knight, this bad guy brings his pals with him, including Ursa, arguably the greatest bad-gal ever filmed. She’s certainly the only one to kick an innocent person so hard in the groin he goes flying through space.

But Superman II and The Dark Knight almost had even more in common. In early drafts Zod had a mate named Jak-El, described as “a psychopathic jokester, whose pranks and practical jokes are only funny to him when they cause death and suffering to others”. Sound familiar?

But Superman II is more than the sum of its villains. Christopher Reeve – so iconic in the first film – really starts to have fun in the sequel, and, with the line between Clark Kent and Superman starting to blur faster than a speeding bullet, he has a lot more to do here.

Margot Kidder, reportedly almost constantly unhappy on-set, brings fresh intelligence (let’s never forget that Lois was introduced in the first film struggling to spell a simple word, which is hardly Pulitzer Prize-winning screenwriting) and bright-eyed spark to Lois, increasing the audience’s personal investment in the film significantly.

Much has been made of the Richard Donner cut (the director was fired during filming, with lost footage eventually replaced after a fan outcry), and it’s great, but the film’s ret-conned reputation does replacement helmer Richard Lester a disservice.

While we love the first film’s reverence, Lester’s approach – including cramming as much into every frame as possible, shooting awe-struck reaction shots, and making Superman’s powers almost casual in their delivery – was far more faithful to the comics. The combination of Donner’s straight-faced respect and Lester’s outlandish set-pieces conspired, much like Clark Kent and Superman themselves, to create the perfect superhero (movie).

But what makes Superman II so special is its humanity. By removing Superman’s powers, bringing him down to our level, Superman II, perversely, reveals the potential superhero in all of us.


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From: http://www.digitalspy.com/movies/superman/feature/a837366/superman-movies-best-worst-ranked/

Best Shots Rapid Fire Reviews: ASTONISHING X-MEN #3, SUPERMAN #30, VENOMVERSE #1, STAR WARS …

IDW Publishing October 2017 cover

Credit: IDW Publishing

Greetings, ‘Rama readers — ready for your Thursday pellets? Best Shots has your back with this week’s Rapid-Fire Reviews! Let’s kick off today’s column with Jocular Joey Edsall, who takes a look at this week’s Astonishing X-Men

Credit: Marvel Comics

Astonishing X-Men #3 (Published by Marvel Comics; Review by Joey Edsall; ‘Rama Rating: 9 out of 10):One of the keys to why Charles Soule’s Astonishing X-Men is so good can be found in the previous issue, where he uses a character as a mouthpiece to bash the limitations of nostalgia. Astonishing X-Men #3 goes a step further, putting on a storytelling clinic of what should be utilized instead of circling back and retreading old grounds: building towards the future. Old Man Logan, Charles Xavier, and Angel each have incredible moments in this issue where they heavily being influenced by their continuity but each has further characterization built on that continuity, with Logan’s self-loathing and PTSD, Xavier’s darkness, and Angel’s light. The artistic team of penciler Ed McGuiness, inker Mark Morales, and colorist Jason Keith give this issue visual flair successfully barring some awkward depictions of Logan’s claws. This is an issue built on character and strong plot progression and manages to do both without sacrificing either.

Credit: DC Comics

Superman #30 (Published by DC Comics; Review by David Pepose; ‘Rama Rating: 8 out of 10): Writer Keith Champagne and a trio of talented artists deliver a strong conclusion to “A Moment Longer,” which pit Superman against the twin threats of Sinestro and his former thrall Parallax. It’s a real testament to Champagne’s work that up until rereading the credits to this book, I had thought it was Peter Tomasi behind the wheel — Champagne does a great job at picking up Tomasi’s themes of making Superman the best of us, as he manages to hold back the embodiment of fear thanks to a sliver of hope. Additionally, Ed Benes, Tyler Kirkham and Philip Tan do a great job at keeping the artwork as seamless as possible here — between all this action, such as Benes’ opening fight between Sinestro and a Parallax-possessed Superman, or Kirkham’s undulating space monster construct holding Superman in an ice cave, this book looks fantastic. This issue does fantastic work, and it is the highest compliment I can give to say that this doesn’t feel like a fill-in arc, but a story that works seamlessly within the rest of Superman’s run.

Credit: Image Comics

Kingsman: The Red Diamond #1 (Published by Image Comics; Review by David Pepose; ‘Rama Rating: 7 out of 10): There is a lot that Rob Williams and Simon Fraser are trying to do with Kingsman: The Red Diamond #1, and so you have to give them credit, even if the various pieces occasionally grind up against one another. On the one hand, you have almost Roger Moore-style James Bond action that keeps the introduction moving at a brisk pace with a roguish sense of humor, but that quickly gives way to super-spy Eggsy getting benched, forcing him to take a good look in the mirror to make sure his time as a Kingsman hasn’t made him the same sort of posh wanker he had despised growing up. (And that’s not even counting the weird, James Cameron-obsessed supervillain at the end of the book, as he murders a computer hacker while spouting some not IMDB-vetted trivia.) It’s a lot going on, and admittedly, Fraser also feels like a weird fit, not quite photorealistic enough to capture Taron Egerton’s likeness, but also a little too smooth to capture Dave Gibbons’ style. All in all, it doesn’t quite hit as hard as a Kingsman should, but with the movie soon in theaters, this is a decent tie-in.

Credit: Marvel Comics

Venomverse #1 (Published by Marvel Comics; Review by Kat Calamia; ‘Rama Rating: 7 out of 10): Venomverse #1 brings Eddie Brock to a world infested by the symbiote-slayers known as Poisons, where Brock’s only chance of survival is putting trust into the other Venoms of the multiverse. Venomverse is the type of comic book you can enjoy if you turn your mind off, and just revel in the series’ bombastic fun. This premiere issue is very similar to the event’s predecessor, Spider-Verse, except this time we aren’t dealing with heroes, but morally ambiguous characters. While the Poisons aren’t as well developed as the Inheritors from Spider-Verse, writer Cullen Bunn still makes this an enjoyable read through Eddie Brock’s interactions with the other Venom characters – especially his dynamic between a Venom-infused Peter Parker. Iban Coello’s pencils and Matt Yackey’s colors give a clean look for this action-packed issue, and does a good job with showcasing the differing Venom costumes with all the detail needed for a Venom suit. Venomverse should be a fun event if it continues to not take itself too seriously.

Credit: IDW Publishing

Star Wars Adventures #1 (Published by IDW Publishing; Review by David Pepose; ‘Rama Rating: 7 out of 10): IDW’s first installment of their all-ages Star Wars Adventures hits comic shops this week, and while it might not necessarily appeal to an older demographic demanding more sophisticated, more “serious” storytelling, the bright artwork of Derek Charm and the fast pace of writer Cavan Scott will likely be more than enough to take young readers to a galaxy far, far away. The main story, featuring Rey’s quest to rescue the jellyfish junkboss Unkar Plutt, starts off with plenty of action, which Charm delivers with a Bruce Timm-like flair — that said, Scott’s story does start to trail off as it moves to its cliffhanger, and admittedly, his dialogue feels a little self-consciously juvenile compared to the polish of The Force Awakens. The backup story, featuring artist Jon Sommariva, is equally kinetic, telling a story about Obi-Wan Kenobi matching wits with a galactic thief, but Scott’s story feels slightly convenient, even with Sommariva’s fantastic character designs and choreography. That said, if you’re looking for more adult Star Wars fare, there’s a whole line of ‘em over at Marvel — and when it comes to young readers, Star Wars Adventures may be more their speed.

Credit: Marvel Comics

Black Bolt #5 (Published by Marvel Comics; Review by Joey Edsall; ‘Rama Rating: 8 out of 10): Narrative isolation has been among the greatest assets to Saladin Ahmed’s impressive Black Bolt run, but to get the titular character out of his most recent predicament, that has to be partially sacrificed. Lesser writers would have stumbled on Lockjaw’s entrance to the story, passing information on the other relevant Inhumans’ adventures, or the opening Black Bolt origin flashback, the last of which features guest artist Frazer Irving delivering a characteristically stellar four pages. Not overshadowed in the slightest, artist Christian Ward again exceeds his already outstanding work on the series, with this being his best artistic showing to date. From the first issue, this series has been a visual cornucopia, and this issue showcases Ward’s skill with dynamic action sequences. Ahmed’s storytelling is effective enough that the sheer amount of hand-waving in this issue’s plot doesn’t send up any red flags on the first read through, and the ending satisfyingly answers the nagging questions of the morality behind ancient Inhumans creating the jail in the first place.

Credit: Alex Ross (DC Comics/Vertigo)

Astro City #47 (Published by DC Comics; Review by David Pepose; ‘Rama Rating: 9 out of 10): Who’s a good boy? When it comes to Astro City #47, we’re the ones getting a treat, as writer Kurt Busiek teams up with Battlepug creator Mike Norton to present G-Dog — half-man, half-dog, all superhero. What could have been just a dumb gag becomes an endearing and engaging read, as we meet a wannabe criminal who has his entire life turned around when he steals a corgi named Hank… as well as a magical amulet that occasionally fuses the two together, Firestorm-style. Busiek has said this story is based on his own experience as a dog owner, and it’s that characterization — such as Hank instinctively turning his master into a superhero to protect the rest of the human “herd” — that makes this book such a must-read. Norton’s artwork fits in that unassuming Astro City mold — it’s not flashy, but instead supremely solid, with a wonderful sense of acting and expressiveness. If you’re a dog lover and a fan of superheroes, take yourself out for a walk and get Astro City #47.

Credit: Marvel Comics

Generations: Iron Man/Ironheart #1 (Published by Marvel Comics; Review by Kat Calamia; ‘Rama Rating: 4 out of 10): Generations: Iron Man/Ironheart #1 gives a different take for the Generations lineup by sending Riri Willaims into the future instead of the past. But sadly this issue doesn’t use Riri and Tony’s meet-up to its fullest advantage, lacking heart and purpose compared to the other Generations titles. It’s nice to see a good future for Riri where she’s known across the galaxy, but this doesn’t directly tie into any current storyline going on in the main Invincible Iron Man title. Additionally, while many of the other Generations books have young heroes seeing their predecessors for the first time in ages, the interaction between Riri and Tony feels hollow because it’s feels exactly like the dynamic they already have in every issue of Invincible Iron Man. That said, the coloring by Marco Rudy, Dean White, and Paul Mounts was my favorite aspect of the issue. The blue colors worked really well to depict this future world. But even with the solid, more consistent coloring the multiple pencilers made the issue feel uneven. Generations: Iron Man/Ironheart has a few nice goodies with the appearances of The Next Avengers and Sorcerer Supreme Tony Stark, but this still isn’t enough for the book’s $4.99 price tag.

From: https://www.newsarama.com/36302-best-shots-rapid-fire-reviews-astonishing-x-men-3-superman-30-venomverse-1-star-wars-adventures-1-more.html

DC Comics Rebirth Spoilers & Review: Is Superman #30 A Dark …

DC Comics Rebirth Spoilers and Review for Superman #30 follows.

Sinestro vs. Parallax, the yellow fear entity, with Superman caught in the middle.

The book opens Parallax in possession of Superman giving a soliloquy to Sinestro that catches readers up on what happened last issue.

Sinestro is losing badly, but at his earlier planned command the Weaponeers of Qward of transported them to the anti-matter universe.

There in the frigid elements Parallax’s hold in Superman weakens…

…as we see the nightmares and fears of Superman…

…over three pages making this perhaps a stealth tie-in to Dark Nights Metal due to the recent reveal that…

…that the dark multiverse is made of up several universes based on the nightmares and fears of those in the regular multiverse like Superman.

Parallax has been influencing those around Sinestro trying to defeat him to no avail including a Weaponeer of Qward. A weakened Superman saves the Weaponeer saves him…

…as Parallax escapes and does battle with Sinestro for some time.

A freed Superman interjects and…

…has a plan to stop Parallax. He literally leaps into Parallax, showing no fear in a bad ass way, and…

…traps him in Sinestro’s ring to be delivered to Hal Jordan, Green Lantern.

The book ends with Sinestro ring-less and Superman perhaps changing the nature of Weaponeers of Qward; will they be lackeys or feared warriors the next time we meet them?

So…

A rollercoaster adventure that was quite entertaining. Superman almost took a backseat in his own book until the end. Overall, still fum. 8 out of 10.

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From: http://insidepulse.com/2017/09/06/dc-comics-rebirth-spoilers-review-is-superman-30-a-dark-nights-metal-stealth-tie-in-and-just-how-bad-ass-is-the-man-of-steel/

Is This Our First Look at Superman’s Black Suit From JUSTICE LEAGUE?

Warning: there are potential spoilers ahead for the Justice League movie. This is your only chance to turn back and remain unspoiled!

While the marketing team behind Justice League has demonstrated remarkable restraint by not showing Superman‘s presence in the trailers, it’s not exactly a secret that Henry Cavill‘s Man of Steel is coming back from the dead. Even Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice didn’t pretend that Clark Kent’s alter ego was gone forever, but there are still some questions about how and why he will make his return. Today’s Nerdist News is examining what may be the first look at Superman’s black costume, which played a key role in his comic book resurrection!

Join host and the protector of New Genesis, Jessica Chobot, as she shows off a leaked photo from Mattel’s upcoming Justice League line that features two Superman figures. In the first figure, the Last Son of Krypton is wearing his traditional red and blue costume, while the second figure features Kal-El in a black costume with a silver “S” on his chest. During the famous Death and Return of Superman storyline from the ’90s, the black costume was worn by Superman when he was brought back to life via Kryptonian technology. He also also came back with a Super-Mullet, but we’re trying to forget that part.

It has to be noted that both Man of Steel and Batman v Superman were both given Superman in black costume figures for their respective toy lines. That could mean that Justice League‘s black costume Superman action figure isn’t indicative of anything in the movie. But if there was ever a time to use that costume in live-action, it’s right now. Plus, it can serve two purposes within the film: the black costume is either a part of the technology that will be used to save Superman, or it will be used to illustrate his corruption by the forces of Apokolips.

Are you looking forward to seeing Superman wearing his black outfit in live-action? Call upon your Mother Boxes to leave comments below!

From: http://nerdist.com/justice-league-superman-black-suit-nerdist-news/

Fan Expo 2017 & DC Comics Rebirth Spoilers: Superman Comics …

Fan Expo 2017 and DC Comics Rebirth Spoilers follow for Superman.

During Fan Expo 2017 week, DC Comics changed its solicitations for Superman comics ending September 2017 and starting October 2017.

Instead of Imperious Lex we get Deathstroke!

Check out the new solicitations.

      SUPERMAN #31
      Written by JAMES BONNY
      Art by TYLER KIRKHAM
      Cover by IAN CHURCHILL

      Lois Lane is after the interview of a lifetime. The subject of her Daily Planet article: Deathstroke the Terminator! Determined to get “inside the mind of a killer,” Lois follows a trail of bodies across the globe and comes face to face with the ultimate assassin. But the encounter turns deadly and, with Superman half a world away, the interview of a lifetime could cost Lois Lane her life!

      On sale SEPTEMBER 20 • 32 pg, FC, $2.99 US • RATED T

      SUPERMAN #32
      Written by JAMES BONNY
      Art by TYLER KIRKHAM
      Cover by IAN CHURCHILL

      Deathstroke has come to Metropolis…and he’s got his sights set on Superman. Slade Wilson gives the Man of Steel an impossible choice: maintain his ideals and let the love of his life die, or save Lois Lane and become a killer himself. Will Deathstoke push Superman to his breaking point?

      On sale OCTOBER 4 • 32 pg, FC, $2.99 US • RATED T

    The original solicitations were as follows.

        SUPERMAN #31
        Written by PETER J. TOMASI and PATRICK GLEASON
        Art by DOUG MAHNKE and JAIME MENDOZA

        “IMPERIUS LEX!” It’s a game of thrones on Apokolips as the lords of the dreaded world battle each other to claim its rule. Lex Luthor is summoned back to the warring planet, and he will need Superman to help him reclaim a crown he did not ask for. Meanwhile, Lois is confronted by the Female Furies and Jon faces the Children of the Firepits.

        On sale SEPTEMBER 20 • 32 pg, FC, $2.99 US • RATED T

        SUPERMAN #32

        Written by PETER J. TOMASI and PATRICK GLEASON
        Art by DOUG MAHNKE and JAIME MENDOZA
        “IMPERIUS LEX” part two! As the conflict continues, Superman teams with Lex Luthor to bring peace to a leaderless and warring Apokolips as a new warrior enters the battlefield: Lois Lane, female fury. May Granny Goodness have mercy on all their souls…

        On sale OCTOBER 4 • 32 pg, FC, $2.99 US • RATED T

      This looks intriguing.

      Tags: , , , , , , , ,

      From: http://insidepulse.com/2017/09/04/fan-expo-2017-dc-comics-rebirth-spoilers-superman-comics-for-september-october-2017-changed-with-deathstroke-replacing-lex-luthor/

      Funko Adds Classic Superman, Batman, And More To NYCC …

      New York Comic Con might still be a few months away, but Funko has just unveiled its newest exclusives tied to the event!

      Earlier today, Funko previewed a DC Comics-inspired wave of NYCC exclusives which are sure to excite fans of two of DC’s biggest heroes.

      Perhaps the most noteworthy collectible is the First Appearance Superman Pop! figure, which, as the name suggests, presents the character in his costume seen in Action Comics #1. This isn’t the first figure Funko has made of this Superman variant, with an Articulated Action Figure of him previously appearing in a DC’s Legion of Collectors subscription box.

      The rest of the wave is, unsurprisingly, dominated by none other than The Dark Knight. Funko’s NYCC exclusives will mark the debut of the company’s 8-Bit Pop! line, with a blue-and-grey Batman figure. The wave will also include a Black Chrome Batman after a Blue Chrome variant made waves at this year’s San Diego Comic-Con.

      For fans of Funko’s other products, the wave will also include a 4,000-piece Dorbz 3-Pack of villains from the classic Batman TV series. The three-pack will include King Tut, The Riddler, and Mr. Freeze, all of whom previously made their debut in Funko’s Articulated Action Figure line.

      Speaking of, rounding out the line is an exclusive Action Figure of Batman with a blue Batmobile. This will be available in a limited run of 1,250 pieces, and comes after a Red Batmobile with Green Batman debuted at SDCC as well.

      Aside from the Dorbz and Action Figure, the remainder of the figures appear to be shared, meaning they will be available in select stores during NYCC weekend. Previously announced Funko NYCC exclusives include a Zack Ryder WWE Pop!, and two new Game of Thrones Pops!.

      Click through our gallery below to check out Funko’s NYCC exclusive DC Comics figures.

      From: http://comicbook.com/dc/2017/08/30/funko-nycc-2017-exclusives-dc-batman-superman/

      This Is What Justice League’s Black Suit Superman Could Look Like

      The Justice League Movie Gallery Gallery

      From: http://comicbook.com/dc/2017/09/02/justice-league-black-suit-superman-fan-art/

      The Top 5 Best DC Comics To Adapt For Warner’s New ‘Elseworld’ Films

      With the recent reports of Warner Bros.’ planned Joker origin film, and its status as a standalone one-shot release kicking off a new category of DC Comics adaptations unconnected to the larger DC shared cinematic universe of films, there’s been speculation about what other projects might arise under the new DC film “elseworld” banner. There’s plenty of great options to choose from, but I’ve made a short list what I feel are the very best, plus the reasons they’d make great movie projects.

      Source: Warner Bros

      Cover for Warner’s “The Killing Joke” animated Blu-ray release

      The sheer existence of this new standalone label for superhero filmmaking could usher in a whole new era for the genre — or more accurately, reintroduce us all to the way these films used to sometimes be made in the era before shared cinematic universes. Remember, studios were releasing unconnected superhero movies and series regularly for decades, until 2008 brought the Marvel Cinematic Universe. But even the arrival of the MCU didn’t instantly change how we think about superhero movies. It wasn’t until the whole experiment paid off to mind-blowing box office and critical results with 2012’s The Avengers that our way of thinking about the genre changed completely.

      In fact, Warner itself was releasing stand-alone Batman films, adapting Watchmen, adapting V for Vendetta, Jonah Hex, and The Losers, so while that’s not quite the same as a dedicated banner for standalone films, by default that’s what they were doing anyway. Now those films will find a more consistent home and label, and can include characters already existing in other films over in the DCEU proper. So Warner is really reviving a concept that was working pretty well in the past but got sort of lost by the wayside amid the scramble of studios to forge shared universes for every brand.

      Red Son is one of the single greatest comic book stories ever written. It’s also a story that gets to the nuances and ideals of Superman, the complexities and contradictions, and its portrayal of Superman and his impact on the world is among the finest in comic history. Likewise, the story’s version of Lex Luthor is perhaps the best in any story on page or screen. For years, fans have hoped for some sort of live-action or animated adaptation, and in the aftermath of word that Warner is creating a new banner for live-action standalone one-shot DC movies separate from the larger library of DCEU films, Red Son is probably the most popular choice for what fans hope to seen next from that new corner of DC cinema.

      Source: DC Comics

      Cover for the DC Comics comic book series “Red Son”

      There are three possible ways to adapt Red Son to live-action, so the question is, which works best for Red Son? The first option is just the standard cinematic adaptation. But would Red Son work as a single movie?

      There’s so much rich history and so many important details to explore that make Red Son so great, and it would be a shame to see it finally adapted only to fall short of potential. On the other hand, Zack Snyder adapted Watchmen — a twelve-issue comic series that included lots of additional material — and despite losing some added layers and deeper background in the story, the theatrical cut was largely faithful and excellent. The Ultimate Cut, which incorporated deleted scenes and an animated adaptation of Watchmen’s comic-within-the-comic, was a masterpiece achieving a level of faithfulness rare in cinematic adaptation. Perhaps a similar method would work for Red Son — a shorter theatrical cut, with a planned longer version for home entertainment.

      The second option is to film a roughly seven-hour theatrical version that splits up into a trilogy of two-hour twenty-odd minute installments, and release them back-to-back over the course of three years. This would allow a much more faithful, richer adaptation as well as maximizing the box office potential. On the other hand, if audiences don’t really take to this alternate version of the popular heroes, then the expense of three chapters becomes a liability to its profitability. And with these new banner “elseworld” releases coming amid the other library of DCEU titles, it could be less appealing to have several Red Son releases three years in a row while other DCEU films play out their own connected stories.

      Which brings us to a possibility that I feel might be the best options — a Red Son miniseries on TV. The comic is only three parts, but could easily fill a five-part TV series on HBO or Netflix. In fact, Red Son would be a perfect title for a primetime network miniseries on NBC, CBS, or FOX. By investing to get the visual effects right (Flash costs roughly $3 million per episode, while Game of Thrones comes in north of $10 million per episode), and with some really inspired casting choices, a Red Son series could set a new standard for what superhero television can achieve. It’s so different, so strange and shocking at times, so brilliant and dramatic, it could capture audiences’ imaginations in a way no other comic book show has.

      But would Warner take their new one-shot banner to television, or is it exclusively reserved for the big screen? My opinion is, if the Joker origin movie is a hit, and if perhaps one more of the new standalone films likewise proves the concept is successful, then using TV as well as cinema makes perfect sense if the idea is to transcend limitations on what’s possible for filimmakers and for adapting DC stories to whatever medium works best for a given tale. Indeed, even if the Joker or other such films don’t seem to quite catch fire as hoped, maybe having a TV backup option is still a smart move, to find out what works and what doesn’t for this new banner concept. It could be that it’s so popular the idea fits on both big and small screens, or that it seems to work best only in theaters or only on TV. The only way to find out, is to try, and that’s exactly the thinking behind the whole effort to begin with, right?

      For an example project that seems destined for big-screen glory, perhaps none is as perfect as Kingdom Come. It’s a future version of the Justice League filled with the same sort of complex examination of heroes and their implications for our world that make Red Son so iconic, and is another story fans have long hoped to see adapted to live-action. My own feeling is, there’s an added bonus that could make Kingdom Come a mind-blowing standalone adaptation — what if they cast Michael Keaton as Batman, Lynda Carter as Wonder Woman, and Brandon Routh as Superman (or perhaps Jon Hamm), making the film an alternate version of the DCEU in which the previous live-action incarnations of heroes existed together and now converge for their own Justice League? It would be pretty amazing to see, and I bet it would add a whole other level of buzz and anticipation among mainstream audiences as well as fans.

      Source: DC Comics

      Cover for the DC Comics comic book series “Kingdom Come”

      However it wound up being adapted, Kingdom Come definitely needs to be on the short-list of Warner’s planned “elseworld” releases, not just because it’s so great and lends itself so perfectly to this exact sort of alternate-reality cinematic status, but also because it has some of the best potential to be a huge box office hit that boosts the value and popularity of the label for this corner of the DC movie adaptations.

      Catwoman: The Dark End of the Street is among the greatest (collected) Catwoman stories/runs ever, and I’ve long argued someone needs to adapt it and/or its version of Catwoman to the big screen. With the arrival of the “elseworld” banner, it’s possible to do it even if that particular story/incarnation isn’t what the studio plans for the character in the larger DCEU. We’d get a terrific noir approach with detective elements and anti-heroism that could deliver a definitive live-action version of Catwoman.

      Source: DC Comics

      Cover for DC Comics comic book series “Trail of the Catwoman”

      If Warner/DC Entertainment plan to use that story and inspiration for Catwoman in the DCEU, then by all means save it and use it there. But if not, it deserves attention and adaptation in the standalone corner of DC on film, and after a Joker origin one-shot I think a Catwoman one-shot could be the perfect choice for a follow-up of a similar sort (a modest budget and more down to earth noir-crime storytelling). As a side note, another option for Catwoman is for Warner to spin her off from Gotham into a miniseries adapting The Dark End of the Street (but altered to fit Camren Bicondova’s age from that show. Or, in keeping with my earlier point about letting the “elseworld” banner develop projects on TV as well as film, do a Catwoman TV miniseries adapting this source material. One way or another, this story deserves the live-action treatment.

      We should probably talk about the one-shot standalone movie a lot of fans probably want to see, but which could be problematic at this point — The Dark Knight Returns. It is undeniably one of the most well-known, popular, and important of modern comics, and a few years ago I’d have included it on this list as probably the top candidate for Warner’s new banner of “elseworld” tales. But in the previous five years, we had not one but two films heavily inspired by this comic, with 2012’s The Dark Knight Rises borrowing heavily from it (albeit with significant changes and inspiration from other stories as well) and then last year’s Batman v Superman taking lots of inspiration, dialogue, and entire sequences lifted straight from the pages of The Dark Knight Returns comic. There was also a two-part animated adaptation of the comic released on Blu-ray/DVD/Digital-HD.

      So is it really necessary to attempt yet another live-action adaptation, especially any time soon? I’d argue not, and instead feel there’s plenty of other options that deserve attention first. On the other hand, I’m not blind to how great it might be to see the entire four-book The Dark Knight Returns series brought to life in live-action, especially considering the very best part of that series has been largely ignored in live-action so far, which raises a compelling idea…

      Source: Warner Bros

      Cover for Warner’s “The Dark Knight Returns” animated Blu-ray release

      What if this new banner of DC one-shot adaptations allowed for films that can have sequels and turn into their own “elseworld” series apart from all other DC movies? The Dark Knight Returns could become four separate films instead of a single movie cramming the whole comic storyline into one release. I like that idea, because Book One of the comic — the chapter where Bruce becomes Batman again, to battle Two-Face — is one of the single greatest Batman stories ever told, is the most perfect and definitive Two-Face story, and has possibly the most sublime ending of any Batman comic in history. A movie that just adapts that one story would be magnificent, and allows future “elseworld” banner releases to continue the story with adaptations of the subsequent chapters too.

      Of course, doing this would restrict the ability of other Batman films to adapt or otherwise take inspiration from The Dark Knight Returns in a way similar to The Dark Knight Rises and Batman v Superman, so it might not be ideal after all. And really, I do hope the whole one-shot banner of films avoids just becoming a playground for primarily Batman-centric releases. I’m a huge fan of Batman, obviously, but there’s going to be plenty of Batman and bat-family releases in the coming several years, including the Joker origin movie that kicks off the whole “elseworld” concept on screen, so other stories should take precedent.

      One project that’s already been in development a few years, and which has gone through a few different incarnations already on its rocky path to the big screen, is Justice League Dark (aka Dark Universe). While that film has been intended to exist within the larger DCEU, I just want to mention that it might make sense to develop it entirely on its own within the “elseworld” banner instead. Why? Well, it opens to the door to using any and every character a filmmaker decides to include, it allows the possibility to do things to the reality and world of the story that might otherwise be precluded if the story is set in the same world as the Justice League characters (for example, a world-threatening Cthulhu crisis would probably attract the attention of Superman or Aquaman, and would at the very least be important enough and historic enough to be mentioned at some point in the other DC characters’ films, right?).

      Source: DC Comics

      Cover for DC Comics comic book series “Justice League Dark”

      While JL Dark can of course be developed and work fine within the larger DCEU, I personally feel that it would be cool to see it get its own world to play with and to perhaps have sequels that include cameos of different iterations of the main DCEU heroes/villains, or perhaps even lacking the rest of the DCEU characters, for example. Regardless, while it seems unlikely to happen, I hope Warner considers this option for the project.

      Besides just adapting existing source material stories, it’s also of course entirely possible to let filmmakers come up with unique original stories using various DC characters. In fact, it may be not only possible but in fact probable, in light of the Joker origin tale seeming to be a mostly original concept inspired by certain background stories for the character but not directly adapting them to the screen entirely. The idea of period settings is especially interesting if the new DC film banner takes full advantage of potential to play around not just with the stories and characters but even the stylings and tone of various cinematic periods.

      For example — black and white film noir, technicolor musicals, silent films, ’70s exploitation cinema, and other such examples of utilizing not only period story settings but period-accurate filmmaking would be a wonderful way to truly let this banner become a place for artists to experiment with the boundaries and lack thereof in comic book storytelling. Some black and white 1930s and 1940s noir is the most glaringly obvious example of a period-precise playground for such experimentation (especially if a lot of the “elseworld” films wound up being tied to the bat-family, which again I don’t want to see happen if it’s to the exclusion of so many other great story options), but hopefully the full array of opportunity would be explored.

      A 1940s technicolor-style Justice Society of America patriotic musical film could be spectacular, as would a 1950s horror/sci-fi Swamp Thing movie mirroring the undertones about fear of communism and nuclear power/war. I wouldn’t mind seeing a Green Lantern-Green Arrow team-up movie or TV series set during the Civil Rights Movement, mirroring 1960s and 1970s film and television style, adapting the classic awesome run by Denny O’Neil and Neal Adams from the ’70s comics. This idea of films pretending to come from bygone eras of film arises from my belief that Tim Burton’s Batman Returns is perhaps best enjoyed when watched in black white, with the sound turned off and closed captioning on, while a Wagner album is played for musical accompaniment to create the impression you’re viewing an old silent German expressionist Batman film inspired by the character’s earlier, darker, killing-is-okay days.

      There’s lots of other stories that offer good potential for adapting within an “elseworld” banner, and I’m sure Warner will come up with plenty nobody has even considered yet. This is all getting way ahead of ourselves, admittedly, since so far only one film — the Joker origin movie — exists under the standalone branding, and we have to wait and see if it’s as successful as the studio hopes (and as at first glance seems likely, since the Joker has obvious built-in brand power). But while we wait, it’s interesting to consider the options and speculate about what could potentially result in the best use of one-shot cinematic adaptations. So expect more articles like this in the coming months and years while we wait to see what Warner has in store for us, and enjoy!

      Box office figures and tallies based on data via Box Office Mojo, Rentrak, and TheNumbers.

      Follow me on Twitter, on Google+and on Quora.  Read my blog.

      From: https://www.forbes.com/sites/markhughes/2017/09/01/the-top-5-best-dc-comics-to-adapt-for-warners-new-elseworld-films/

      The Top 5 Best DC Comics To Adapt For Warner’s New ‘Elseworld’ Films

      With the recent reports of Warner Bros.’ planned Joker origin film, and its status as a standalone one-shot release kicking off a new category of DC Comics adaptations unconnected to the larger DC shared cinematic universe of films, there’s been speculation about what other projects might arise under the new DC film “elseworld” banner. There’s plenty of great options to choose from, but I’ve made a short list what I feel are the very best, plus the reasons they’d make great movie projects.

      Source: Warner Bros

      Cover for Warner’s “The Killing Joke” animated Blu-ray release

      The sheer existence of this new standalone label for superhero filmmaking could usher in a whole new era for the genre — or more accurately, reintroduce us all to the way these films used to sometimes be made in the era before shared cinematic universes. Remember, studios were releasing unconnected superhero movies and series regularly for decades, until 2008 brought the Marvel Cinematic Universe. But even the arrival of the MCU didn’t instantly change how we think about superhero movies. It wasn’t until the whole experiment paid off to mind-blowing box office and critical results with 2012’s The Avengers that our way of thinking about the genre changed completely.

      In fact, Warner itself was releasing stand-alone Batman films, adapting Watchmen, adapting V for Vendetta, Jonah Hex, and The Losers, so while that’s not quite the same as a dedicated banner for standalone films, by default that’s what they were doing anyway. Now those films will find a more consistent home and label, and can include characters already existing in other films over in the DCEU proper. So Warner is really reviving a concept that was working pretty well in the past but got sort of lost by the wayside amid the scramble of studios to forge shared universes for every brand.

      Red Son is one of the single greatest comic book stories ever written. It’s also a story that gets to the nuances and ideals of Superman, the complexities and contradictions, and its portrayal of Superman and his impact on the world is among the finest in comic history. Likewise, the story’s version of Lex Luthor is perhaps the best in any story on page or screen. For years, fans have hoped for some sort of live-action or animated adaptation, and in the aftermath of word that Warner is creating a new banner for live-action standalone one-shot DC movies separate from the larger library of DCEU films, Red Son is probably the most popular choice for what fans hope to seen next from that new corner of DC cinema.

      Source: DC Comics

      Cover for the DC Comics comic book series “Red Son”

      There are three possible ways to adapt Red Son to live-action, so the question is, which works best for Red Son? The first option is just the standard cinematic adaptation. But would Red Son work as a single movie?

      There’s so much rich history and so many important details to explore that make Red Son so great, and it would be a shame to see it finally adapted only to fall short of potential. On the other hand, Zack Snyder adapted Watchmen — a twelve-issue comic series that included lots of additional material — and despite losing some added layers and deeper background in the story, the theatrical cut was largely faithful and excellent. The Ultimate Cut, which incorporated deleted scenes and an animated adaptation of Watchmen’s comic-within-the-comic, was a masterpiece achieving a level of faithfulness rare in cinematic adaptation. Perhaps a similar method would work for Red Son — a shorter theatrical cut, with a planned longer version for home entertainment.

      The second option is to film a roughly seven-hour theatrical version that splits up into a trilogy of two-hour twenty-odd minute installments, and release them back-to-back over the course of three years. This would allow a much more faithful, richer adaptation as well as maximizing the box office potential. On the other hand, if audiences don’t really take to this alternate version of the popular heroes, then the expense of three chapters becomes a liability to its profitability. And with these new banner “elseworld” releases coming amid the other library of DCEU titles, it could be less appealing to have several Red Son releases three years in a row while other DCEU films play out their own connected stories.

      Which brings us to a possibility that I feel might be the best options — a Red Son miniseries on TV. The comic is only three parts, but could easily fill a five-part TV series on HBO or Netflix. In fact, Red Son would be a perfect title for a primetime network miniseries on NBC, CBS, or FOX. By investing to get the visual effects right (Flash costs roughly $3 million per episode, while Game of Thrones comes in north of $10 million per episode), and with some really inspired casting choices, a Red Son series could set a new standard for what superhero television can achieve. It’s so different, so strange and shocking at times, so brilliant and dramatic, it could capture audiences’ imaginations in a way no other comic book show has.

      But would Warner take their new one-shot banner to television, or is it exclusively reserved for the big screen? My opinion is, if the Joker origin movie is a hit, and if perhaps one more of the new standalone films likewise proves the concept is successful, then using TV as well as cinema makes perfect sense if the idea is to transcend limitations on what’s possible for filimmakers and for adapting DC stories to whatever medium works best for a given tale. Indeed, even if the Joker or other such films don’t seem to quite catch fire as hoped, maybe having a TV backup option is still a smart move, to find out what works and what doesn’t for this new banner concept. It could be that it’s so popular the idea fits on both big and small screens, or that it seems to work best only in theaters or only on TV. The only way to find out, is to try, and that’s exactly the thinking behind the whole effort to begin with, right?

      For an example project that seems destined for big-screen glory, perhaps none is as perfect as Kingdom Come. It’s a future version of the Justice League filled with the same sort of complex examination of heroes and their implications for our world that make Red Son so iconic, and is another story fans have long hoped to see adapted to live-action. My own feeling is, there’s an added bonus that could make Kingdom Come a mind-blowing standalone adaptation — what if they cast Michael Keaton as Batman, Lynda Carter as Wonder Woman, and Brandon Routh as Superman (or perhaps Jon Hamm), making the film an alternate version of the DCEU in which the previous live-action incarnations of heroes existed together and now converge for their own Justice League? It would be pretty amazing to see, and I bet it would add a whole other level of buzz and anticipation among mainstream audiences as well as fans.

      Source: DC Comics

      Cover for the DC Comics comic book series “Kingdom Come”

      However it wound up being adapted, Kingdom Come definitely needs to be on the short-list of Warner’s planned “elseworld” releases, not just because it’s so great and lends itself so perfectly to this exact sort of alternate-reality cinematic status, but also because it has some of the best potential to be a huge box office hit that boosts the value and popularity of the label for this corner of the DC movie adaptations.

      Catwoman: The Dark End of the Street is among the greatest (collected) Catwoman stories/runs ever, and I’ve long argued someone needs to adapt it and/or its version of Catwoman to the big screen. With the arrival of the “elseworld” banner, it’s possible to do it even if that particular story/incarnation isn’t what the studio plans for the character in the larger DCEU. We’d get a terrific noir approach with detective elements and anti-heroism that could deliver a definitive live-action version of Catwoman.

      Source: DC Comics

      Cover for DC Comics comic book series “Trail of the Catwoman”

      If Warner/DC Entertainment plan to use that story and inspiration for Catwoman in the DCEU, then by all means save it and use it there. But if not, it deserves attention and adaptation in the standalone corner of DC on film, and after a Joker origin one-shot I think a Catwoman one-shot could be the perfect choice for a follow-up of a similar sort (a modest budget and more down to earth noir-crime storytelling). As a side note, another option for Catwoman is for Warner to spin her off from Gotham into a miniseries adapting The Dark End of the Street (but altered to fit Camren Bicondova’s age from that show. Or, in keeping with my earlier point about letting the “elseworld” banner develop projects on TV as well as film, do a Catwoman TV miniseries adapting this source material. One way or another, this story deserves the live-action treatment.

      We should probably talk about the one-shot standalone movie a lot of fans probably want to see, but which could be problematic at this point — The Dark Knight Returns. It is undeniably one of the most well-known, popular, and important of modern comics, and a few years ago I’d have included it on this list as probably the top candidate for Warner’s new banner of “elseworld” tales. But in the previous five years, we had not one but two films heavily inspired by this comic, with 2012’s The Dark Knight Rises borrowing heavily from it (albeit with significant changes and inspiration from other stories as well) and then last year’s Batman v Superman taking lots of inspiration, dialogue, and entire sequences lifted straight from the pages of The Dark Knight Returns comic. There was also a two-part animated adaptation of the comic released on Blu-ray/DVD/Digital-HD.

      So is it really necessary to attempt yet another live-action adaptation, especially any time soon? I’d argue not, and instead feel there’s plenty of other options that deserve attention first. On the other hand, I’m not blind to how great it might be to see the entire four-book The Dark Knight Returns series brought to life in live-action, especially considering the very best part of that series has been largely ignored in live-action so far, which raises a compelling idea…

      Source: Warner Bros

      Cover for Warner’s “The Dark Knight Returns” animated Blu-ray release

      What if this new banner of DC one-shot adaptations allowed for films that can have sequels and turn into their own “elseworld” series apart from all other DC movies? The Dark Knight Returns could become four separate films instead of a single movie cramming the whole comic storyline into one release. I like that idea, because Book One of the comic — the chapter where Bruce becomes Batman again, to battle Two-Face — is one of the single greatest Batman stories ever told, is the most perfect and definitive Two-Face story, and has possibly the most sublime ending of any Batman comic in history. A movie that just adapts that one story would be magnificent, and allows future “elseworld” banner releases to continue the story with adaptations of the subsequent chapters too.

      Of course, doing this would restrict the ability of other Batman films to adapt or otherwise take inspiration from The Dark Knight Returns in a way similar to The Dark Knight Rises and Batman v Superman, so it might not be ideal after all. And really, I do hope the whole one-shot banner of films avoids just becoming a playground for primarily Batman-centric releases. I’m a huge fan of Batman, obviously, but there’s going to be plenty of Batman and bat-family releases in the coming several years, including the Joker origin movie that kicks off the whole “elseworld” concept on screen, so other stories should take precedent.

      One project that’s already been in development a few years, and which has gone through a few different incarnations already on its rocky path to the big screen, is Justice League Dark (aka Dark Universe). While that film has been intended to exist within the larger DCEU, I just want to mention that it might make sense to develop it entirely on its own within the “elseworld” banner instead. Why? Well, it opens to the door to using any and every character a filmmaker decides to include, it allows the possibility to do things to the reality and world of the story that might otherwise be precluded if the story is set in the same world as the Justice League characters (for example, a world-threatening Cthulhu crisis would probably attract the attention of Superman or Aquaman, and would at the very least be important enough and historic enough to be mentioned at some point in the other DC characters’ films, right?).

      Source: DC Comics

      Cover for DC Comics comic book series “Justice League Dark”

      While JL Dark can of course be developed and work fine within the larger DCEU, I personally feel that it would be cool to see it get its own world to play with and to perhaps have sequels that include cameos of different iterations of the main DCEU heroes/villains, or perhaps even lacking the rest of the DCEU characters, for example. Regardless, while it seems unlikely to happen, I hope Warner considers this option for the project.

      Besides just adapting existing source material stories, it’s also of course entirely possible to let filmmakers come up with unique original stories using various DC characters. In fact, it may be not only possible but in fact probable, in light of the Joker origin tale seeming to be a mostly original concept inspired by certain background stories for the character but not directly adapting them to the screen entirely. The idea of period settings is especially interesting if the new DC film banner takes full advantage of potential to play around not just with the stories and characters but even the stylings and tone of various cinematic periods.

      For example — black and white film noir, technicolor musicals, silent films, ’70s exploitation cinema, and other such examples of utilizing not only period story settings but period-accurate filmmaking would be a wonderful way to truly let this banner become a place for artists to experiment with the boundaries and lack thereof in comic book storytelling. Some black and white 1930s and 1940s noir is the most glaringly obvious example of a period-precise playground for such experimentation (especially if a lot of the “elseworld” films wound up being tied to the bat-family, which again I don’t want to see happen if it’s to the exclusion of so many other great story options), but hopefully the full array of opportunity would be explored.

      A 1940s technicolor-style Justice Society of America patriotic musical film could be spectacular, as would a 1950s horror/sci-fi Swamp Thing movie mirroring the undertones about fear of communism and nuclear power/war. I wouldn’t mind seeing a Green Lantern-Green Arrow team-up movie or TV series set during the Civil Rights Movement, mirroring 1960s and 1970s film and television style, adapting the classic awesome run by Denny O’Neil and Neal Adams from the ’70s comics. This idea of films pretending to come from bygone eras of film arises from my belief that Tim Burton’s Batman Returns is perhaps best enjoyed when watched in black white, with the sound turned off and closed captioning on, while a Wagner album is played for musical accompaniment to create the impression you’re viewing an old silent German expressionist Batman film inspired by the character’s earlier, darker, killing-is-okay days.

      There’s lots of other stories that offer good potential for adapting within an “elseworld” banner, and I’m sure Warner will come up with plenty nobody has even considered yet. This is all getting way ahead of ourselves, admittedly, since so far only one film — the Joker origin movie — exists under the standalone branding, and we have to wait and see if it’s as successful as the studio hopes (and as at first glance seems likely, since the Joker has obvious built-in brand power). But while we wait, it’s interesting to consider the options and speculate about what could potentially result in the best use of one-shot cinematic adaptations. So expect more articles like this in the coming months and years while we wait to see what Warner has in store for us, and enjoy!

      Box office figures and tallies based on data via Box Office Mojo, Rentrak, and TheNumbers.

      Follow me on Twitter, on Google+and on Quora.  Read my blog.

      From: https://www.forbes.com/sites/markhughes/2017/09/01/the-top-5-best-dc-comics-to-adapt-for-warners-new-elseworld-films/

      Wonder Woman’s Take On Violence Separates Her From Batman & Superman

      Superman, Detective Comics, and Batman — shares on the film’s special features how Diana’s (Gal Gadot) take on violence separates her from her Justice League colleagues Batman (Ben Affleck) and Superman (Henry Cavill):

      “They all have very different relationships with violence. Batman is traumatized by violence to such an extent that he wants to control it. Superman’s power set is such that his relationship with violence is you’ve got to hit him so hard for it to matter,” Rucka says. The way you get at Superman is emotionally because you’re not going to beat him by pounding him down unless you happen to have Kryptonite. Diana comes out of a warrior culture that knows what that means in every sense. Diana’s never going to enter into combat without knowing exactly what it is she’s about to do. Her skill, her discipline, she never goes to the sword first.”

      As seen in her origin movie, Diana began her Amazon training as a child under the tutelage of hardened warrior Antiope (Robin Wright), who wished to train the child as a warrior despite the wishes of Diana’s mother, Queen Hippolyta (Connie Nielsen). She would later use these skills to battle Ares during World War I and again decades later in combat against Doomsday, a powerful, hulking creature who claimed the life of Superman. Diana will again be drawn into a fight to save the world in Justice League, where she’ll team with Batman, Aquaman (Jason Momoa), the Flash (Ezra Miller) and Cyborg (Ray Fisher) to take arms against Steppenwolf (Ciarán Hinds).

      The home release of Wonder Woman is accompanied by featurettes that further explore Diana’s character and the making of the film, with director Patty Jenkins taking viewers on an “exclusive journey” through five “A Director’s Vision” featurettes. Wonder Woman is now available to own digitally on iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, Vudu, FandangoNow, the Microsoft Store, and the Playstation Store, and hits 4K UHD and Blu-ray disc on September 19.

      Full Profile Comicbook.com

      by Cameron Bonomolo
      | August 31, 2017

      From: http://comicbook.com/dc/2017/09/01/wonder-woman-batman-superman-take-on-violence/

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