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Where did Superman come from?

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Superman turns 80 this year. But where did he come from?
Wochit

Steel — as in The Man of Steel — is an alloy. It’s composed of iron, carbon and other elements.

A similar point could be made about Superman, 80 years old this June, depending on how you count. (The Action Comics No. 1 comic book where Superman made his debut was labeled “June 1938,” but the issue actually began appearing on newsstands in April.)

Superman is iconic, instantly familiar. But he was a composite: a mix of many things floating around pop culture in 1938. Those elements were well-known to every pulp book-reading, radio-listening, movie-going kid of the 1930s.

It was the way that cartoonists Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster combined them that led to the Big Bang of comic book history: the birth of the superhero.

“Our reaction was less ‘How original!’ than ‘But, of course!'” the cartoonist Jules Feiffer wrote in his landmark 1965 study, “The Great Comic Book Heroes.”

So where did Superman come from? Not from Krypton, that’s for sure. Here’s the anatomy of the Man of Steel: Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue (and red, and yellow).

More: ‘Black Panther’ is here, and so, maybe, is a new day for Hollywood

More: Comic book letterer from Kearny gives superheroes their voice

More: Who was the first superhero? Glen Rock man’s book makes a case for the Phantom

The Name. “Superman” is a German name — but you knew that. “Übermensch,” coined by the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche in 1883 to denote the man of superior morality, had been translated as “Superman” as early as 1903 by George Bernard Shaw for his play “Man and Superman.” Superman was a familiar term by the 1930s — but mostly in sinister contexts (the Nazis, and the self-justifying thrill-killers Leopold and Loeb). Siegel and Shuster themselves had used the term in a 1933 pulp story, “The Reign of the Superman,” as the name of a villain. Their great breakthrough came five years later: when they realized that a Superman could be a hero.

The Place. “Metropolis” just means city. “The mother city of the colony” to use the precise Greek meaning. But the Metropolis Siegel and Shuster had in mind, without doubt, was the eye-popping city of the future that Fritz Lang created for his classic 1927 sci-fi film “Metropolis.” A super-city, for a super man.

The Secret Identity. Every kid in the 1930s knew that the Scarlet Pimpernel, the dashing hero of the 1905 book and 1934 film who rescued victims of the French Revolution, was really Sir Percy Blakeney, a milquetoast whose only seeming talent was writing rhymes like, “Is he in heaven? Is he in hell? That damned elusive Pimpernel!”  Zorro (1919), the Shadow (1930) and the Green Hornet (1936) were other pre-Superman heroes with diffident alter-egos. The difference with Superman, as Feiffer pointed out, is that mild-mannered Clark Kent is the fictional character. Superman disguises himself as Clark Kent, not the other way around.

The Glasses. Eyeglasses, as every school bully knows, are the mark of a wimp. As in, “You wouldn’t hit a guy with glasses, wouldja?” But Clark Kent didn’t start the fashion. Long before, the silent movie comedian Harold Lloyd played a weakling in thick glasses who usually ended up — by the film’s climax — performing some superhuman feat, such as climbing the outside of a skyscraper, or winning a war single-handedly. Who does that remind you of?

The Costume. So why do superheroes wear tights and a cape? Superman’s costume probably goes back to circus performers: the acrobats, strong men, trapeze artists and human cannonballs who were the superheroes of the pre-comic book world. That look was first adopted by Alex Raymond for his futuristic hero Flash Gordon in 1934, and then by Lee Falk for the Phantom, a comic-strip hero (non-super) in 1936. The following year, it appeared on Superman — and then on every other super-person. “If Alex Raymond was the Dior for Superman, Joe Shuster set the fashion from then on,” Feiffer wrote. “Everybody else’s super-costumes were copies from his shop.”

The Powers. Superman’s amazing abilities set him apart from any previous pop hero. But even here, there was precedent. The Shadow, who had the ability to “cloud men’s minds,” had appeared in print in 1930 and on radio in 1931. The pulp hero Doc Savage, “the man of bronze” (1933) was not literally super like the Man of Steel, but very close to it; he also had a “fortress of solitude” in the arctic. John Carter of Mars (1912) was a kind of reverse Superman — an Earthling on the red planet, given superhuman strength and the ability to leap great distances because of the planet’s reduced gravity. Superman, as a matter of fact, couldn’t originally fly, just leap. It was Max Fleischer, producer of Superman cartoons starting in 1941, who made Superman airborne as a concession to his animators.

The Mission. “So was created — SUPERMAN, champion of the oppressed, the physical marvel who had sworn to devote his existence to helping those in need!” So we read in an early issue of Action Comics. Many have pointed out the similarity between Superman and the Golem, a Jewish myth. The Golem is a clay statue brought to life by a rabbi’s magic (and thus also an ancestor of Frankenstein). But the Golem, unlike Frankenstein’s monster, is a super-strong savior, who defends the Jewish people when they’re attacked. Both of Superman’s creators were Jewish, so this may not be a coincidence. Nor is it probably by accident that Superman’s original alien name, on his home planet Krypton, is Kal-El (his father is Jor-El.)  “El” is Hebrew for God. 

Email: beckerman@northjersey.com

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From: https://www.northjersey.com/story/entertainment/2018/06/12/where-did-superman-come/590645002/

Henry Cavill Reveals His Favorite Superman Book By DC Comics

Justice Leaugue Superman Henry CavillHenry Cavill has taken to Instagram to reveal his favorite Superman story by DC Comics.

Having already appeared as Superman in three DC Extended Universe films, actor Henry Cavill has stated that he is willing to reprise the role and has plenty of stories he wants to tell with the Man of Steel. While the details on which stories Henry Cavill would like to bring to the big screen are unknown, the actor celebrated National Superman Day by revealing that Superman: For Tomorrow is his favorite DC Comics story about the Last Son of Krypton.

Cavill praised the “fantastic work” by artist Jim Lee, writer Brian Azzarello, inker Scott Williams and colorist by Alex Sinclair. You can check out his comments in the post below!

For National Superman Day (which is today!) I wanted to post a page from what is, hands down, my favourite Superman book, Superman: For Tomorrow. Drawn by the inimitable Jim Lee, penned by Brian Azzarello, inked by Scott Williams and colored by Alex Sinclair. Absolutely fantastic work by those men and work that I am very thankful for. This, for me, is Superman. #Superman #NationalSupermanDay #DCComics @JimLeeArt @BrianAzzarello @ScottWilliamsInks @SincColor

A post shared by Henry Cavill (@henrycavill) on Jun 12, 2018 at 12:28pm PDT

Henry Cavill most recently played Superman in Justice League.

Fueled by his restored faith in humanity and inspired by Superman’s selfless act, Bruce Wayne enlists the help of his newfound ally, Diana Prince, to face an even greater enemy. Together, Batman and Wonder Woman work quickly to find and recruit a team of metahumans to stand against this newly awakened threat. But despite the formation of this unprecedented league of heroes—Batman, Wonder Woman, Aquaman, Cyborg and The Flash—it may already be too late to save the planet from an assault of catastrophic proportions.

Directed by Zack Snyder, Justice League stars Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Gal Gadot, Ezra Miller, Jason Momoa, Ray Fisher, Amy Adams, Jesse Eisenberg, Amber Heard, Jeremy Irons, J.K. Simmons, Connie Nielsen, Julian Lewis Jones and Ciarán Hinds.

Justice League is now available on Digital HD, 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, Blu-ray 3D Combo Pack, and DVD.

The 10 Strongest Members Of Superman’s Family, Ranked

Superfamily-SupermanSuperman is the first and most powerful superhero in the DC Universe. Due to all of his heroic actions, Superman has earned an inspirational role in the DCU and serves as a beacon of hope for many new heroes. In addition to inspiring heroes in the present, his deeds inspired heroes thousands of years later to develop the Legion of Superheroes.

Superman can’t be everywhere all the time, so he’s lucky enough to have a Superfamily behind him to help. Even with his super strength, there’s no way he can stop every criminal simultaneously, so these other heroes all stepped up to help defend innocent people. Whether they are on the battlefield or saving innocent lives, all of these people are proud members of the Superfamily who will do whatever they have to to accomplish their goals.

Hit Next to discover the 10 strongest members of Superman’s family! 



From: https://heroichollywood.com/henry-cavill-favorite-superman-book-dc/

Man of Steel #1 isn’t just a new Superman series — it’s a new …

Welcome to #1 Comic of the Week, a series where our comics editor, Susana Polo, tips you off to a neat new story or series that kicked off in comics this week — just in time for some weekend reading.


This week marks a new era in Superman comics, making it the best time to get in on the ground floor. Man of Steel #1 isn’t just the beginning of a new miniseries, but the beginning of a new artistic team and the culmination of a lot of behind-the-scenes upheaval for Superman and the comics world.

It all started in November of 2017, when DC Comics announced that veteran Marvel Comics writer/architect Brian Michael Bendis had accepted an exclusive contract with DC. The creator of Jessica Jones and Miles Morales — the writer who’d given Spider-Man, Luke Cage, Daredevil and the Avengers themselves a new lease on life — would be picking up his pen and writing for DC Comics for essentially the first time.


Killer Moth and Firefly in Man of Steel #1, DC Comics (2018).

“You think I’m scared of this place? You think I was too scared to come to Metropolis?”
Brian Michael Bendis, Ivan Reis/DC Comics

Almost immediately afterward, the Superman “office” and DC Comics garnered attention for a very different reason: The company fired Superman group editor Eddie Berganza after the publication of a Buzzfeed report in which multiple women publicly accused the long-time DC Comics employee of sexual misconduct. Berganza’s behavior had been an open secret in the comics industry for years, and was rumored to have prevented women from working in the Superman office (which also oversees the Wonder Woman and Supergirl titles).

The Superman books had a new editor for the first time since 2012, and in February of 2018, DC announced exactly what Brian Michael Bendis would be doing at the company. He was going to take the reins on both core Superman titles, Superman and Action Comics, effectively becoming the architect of the Metropolis setting. And his tenure would kick off with a stand-alone six-issue miniseries called Man of Steel, with one issue being released weekly through May, June and July.

That first issue of Man of Steel is available right now, and it’s got everything you could want in the first issue of a new story.

Plot-wise, Man of Steel #1 leaves more questions open than it answers. Bendis’ new alien villain, Rogol Zaar, claims that Krypton wasn’t destroyed by unchecked natural forces, as we always thought, but by his own hand. But we only have his word for it. At the Daily Planet, Lois Lane is conspicuously missing — Perry White says she quit to write a book, but Clark’s behavior certainly suggests that there’s something more — and a new go-getting reporter with dark intentions has taken her place. (Well, we saw that part in May’s DC Nation #0, which you can still pick up for absolutely free.)

But don’t get worried that the issue is all about big alien threats and mysteries. Sure, Bendis and artist Ivan Reis give us the low down on Rogol Zaar’s anti-Kryptonian vendetta, but a large chunk of the issue is wisely used as a quiet character sketch. It’s just the first issue, and we already know that Bendis’ Superman is a deeply loving mind who wields the powers of a god, and his Clark Kent is a reporter who dedicates himself to finding and speaking the truth.


From Man of Steel #1, DC Comics (2018).

“I wish you could hear this…”
Brian Michael Bendis, Ivan Reis/DC Comics

“Writing Superman in today’s day and age is a such powerful experience,” Bendis told Forbes when Man of Steel was announced. “We live in a world where we’ve heard, ‘Truth, justice, and the American way’ our whole lives, right? But this is the first time those things are really not to be taken for granted. Truth has been revealed to not be as black and white as we thought it was; justice is sadly not always for everybody; and the American Dream, the American way of everybody coming here to pursue the idea that they can live a safe and healthy life — these are ideas we always took for granted, but now we don’t. No matter where you are politically, we just don’t take these things for granted anymore.

“And now I think it’s time Superman stand up and give us that hope we always want from him. It’s a great thing to be writing a character who exudes hope at a time when people really, really need it.”

So where to start in comics this week? Pick up Man of Steel #1, and follow along with #2 next week.

From: https://www.polygon.com/comics/2018/6/1/17417218/superman-man-of-steel-brian-michael-bendis-dc-comics

Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it’s transgender superman

Comics aren’t what they used to be. In 1976 I was 11 — the perfect target audience for probably the most subversive, gory and entertaining comic series in British history, the now legendary Action.

The strips, often rip-offs of movies we readers were too young legally to see, were quite outrageously violent. Hook Jaw was about a heroic great white shark who eats everyone. Death Game 1999 was a death sport based on Rollerball. Kids Rule OK was about a post-apocalyptic world which made Lord of the Flies look like Mary Poppins. Hellman of Hammer Force was the second world war seen from the perspective of a German Panzer major. Inevitably, after complaints from the likes of Mary Whitehouse helped to create a moral panic, it got banned. But from the ashes of Action rose the phoenix of 2000 AD whose creators realised they could get away with murder, so long as they set all their stories in the future.

But what does today’s Generation Snowflake have by way of comic-book entertainment? Well, 2000 AD is still going — just — though it’s gone so wearisomely PC that my brother Dick, a loyal subscriber since pretty much Prog One, finally gave up on it last year. The situation in the US is worse, though. So much worse that you may think what I’m about to describe is satire.

Iron Man is now a 15-year-old black girl who might be a sociopath; the Incredible Hulk is a 19-year-old Asian hipster guy; Thor is a woman who is dying of cancer; and Captain America is a full-on Nazi — to show readers how evil Donald Trump is — while his duties as a good person have been handed over to Falcon, who is much more to be admired, obviously, because he is black.

No, really, this is not a joke designed to satirise the leftist, identity politics lunacy which has afflicted so much of the US entertainment industry. This is what has actually happened to the superheroes of those two iconic imprints Marvel and DC Comics. Their characters have all been updated to make them relevant in a more diverse, gender–fluid age where, as rebel comic-books publisher Vox Day puts it, ‘all the princesses know kung fu and none of them need rescuing’.

Except, of course, the demographic that mainly buys comics — young white males — isn’t much interested in having its consciousness raised. It wants strong storylines with memorable characters, like Spider-Man (now Latino) and Punisher (now trans-gender) used to be before the social justice warriors took over the comics industry. Sure enough, the drop in sales reflects this. In 2016, the total annual sales of the top 300 selling comics in the USA was nearly 90 million; the next year it had fallen below 80 million; this year it may well drop by ten million more.

‘What we heard was that people didn’t want any more diversity. They didn’t want female characters out there… anything that was not a core Marvel character, people were turning their nose against,’ Marvel’s VP of sales made the mistake of admitting last year. In the furore that followed he was then sent out to say the precise opposite —that he was ‘proud and excited’ about all the ‘unique characters that reflect new voices’ in the Marvel universe. Well of course. He had a job to keep.

At this point you might be wondering: if diversity is box-office poison, what about Black Panther — which, having grossed nearly $2 billion worldwide, is now the biggest superhero movie of all the time — whose heroes are mostly black? But the mistake, there, is to confuse the very well-put–together film and its all-star cast with the somewhat lacklustre comic (created in the 1960s by Stan Lee, author of Spider-Man but more recently handed on to the feted but worthy Ta-Nehisi Coates). The film flew, the comic bombed, something which has become true pretty much across the board for Marvel and DC. Increasingly, they depend for their profits not on comic sales, but by exploiting the IP of all their older, classic characters (who remain largely white, male and unreconstructed in the movies).

Almost inevitably, this hideous PC takeover (see also: Gamergate, the video games version) has been christened Comicsgate. If you’re not American or you’re not into comics you may feel disinclined to care. But you should, for comics are yet another theatre in the much wider culture wars being waged by the militant left. Free speech, people’s livelihoods and what ought to be the most basic criterion of all art — the pursuit of excellence — are under threat. Talented comic writers and artists deemed insufficiently woke (i.e. left-wing) have been hounded out of work. Comic-book readers have been treated as if they don’t matter.

One of the miseries inflicted on them is that female characters have got less slim and attractive to discourage any unhealthy objectification. Happily this has created opportunities for upstart independents who can’t abide these new rules. One Jawbreakers (not avowedly political: just pure, escapist entertainment from a team including disgruntled Marvel artists and colourists) has already raised more than $300,000 from its crowdfunded launch on IndieGoGo, sending it near the top of the graphic novel charts.

Another Alt Hero, which launches in print this week after a similarly successful crowdfunding campaign, is attracting interest from the movie industry. One of its heroines, Rebel, is a superhero Southern girl who always seems to be losing part of her skimpy, deeply un-PC Confederate flag-themed costume. Not all the US electorate voted Hillary. Good to see at least some parts of the entertainment industry slowly waking up to the fact.

From: https://www.spectator.co.uk/2018/06/is-it-a-bird-is-it-a-plane-no-its-transgender-superman/

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children’s Theatre of Cincinnati’s Reading of IT’S A BIRD …

SUPERMAN™ is the tale of Superman’s efforts to defeat a vengeful scientist, the new villain Dr. Abner Sedgwick, who seeks to destroy the world’s symbol of good. In this premiere adaptation of the 1966 musical, It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s Superman, this TYA-friendly musical will be sure to soar up, up and away into the hearts of all children and the young at heart.

Composed by Charles Strouse, with lyrics by Lee Adams and book by David Newman and Robert Benton, the musical is based on the comic book character Superman created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. SUPERMAN © TM DC Comics.

DC Comics is considering licensing a junior version of “It’s a Bird…It’s a Plane, It’s Superman” and organized a reading of the script on Friday, June 8, with kids from the Cincinnati Children’s Theatre. Charles Strouse attended the reading for his birthday, and the kids presented him with a cake and sang Happy Birthday!

BroadwayWorld attended the event and you can check out photos below, both of the reading and of the after party with Charles!

Photo Credit: Walter McBride

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Producing Artistic Director Roderick Justice

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Producing Artistic Director Roderick Justice

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Producing Artistic Director Roderick Justice

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Producing Artistic Director Roderick Justice

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Producing Artistic Director Roderick Justice

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Dominic Wintz and Maddi O’Connell

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Dominic Wintz

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Dominic Wintz

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Maddi O’Connell and Dominic Wintz

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Maddi O’Connell and Dominic Wintz

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Maddi O’Connell and Dominic Wintz

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Dominic Wintz, Anthony Frederickson and Maddi O’Connell

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Aubrey E. Jones and Dominic Wintz

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Aubrey E. Jones and Dominic Wintz

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Anthony Frederickson

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Anthony Frederickson

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Dominic Wintz and cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Aubrey E. Jones and Anthony Frederickson

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Aubrey E. Jones and Anthony Frederickson

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
C.J. Zimmer and Dominic Wintz

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Dominic Wintz

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Dominic Wintz

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Dominic Wintz

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Anthony Frederickson and cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Dominic Wintz and cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Dominic Wintz and cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Maddi O’Connell and Dominic Wintz with cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Dominic Wintz and cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Nick Gundrum

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Nick Gundrum

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Dominic Wintz and cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Nick Gundrum and Anthony Frederickson

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Nick Gundrum and Anthony Frederickson

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Nick Gundrum and Anthony Frederickson

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Dominic Wintz and cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Dominic Wintz and cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Dominic Wintz and cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Charles Strouse

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Barbara Siman and Charles Strouse

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Barbara Siman and Charles Strouse with Performer Anthony Frederickson

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Barbara Siman and Charles Strouse

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Barbara Siman and Charles Strouse with family

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Barbara Siman and Charles Strouse with family

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Barbara Siman and Charles Strouse with Cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Barbara Siman and Charles Strouse watching Performer Dominic Wintz during The Children’s Theatre of Cincinnati presentation for composer Charles Strouse of ‘Superman The Musical’ at Ripley Grier Studios on June 8, 2018 in New York City.

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Barbara Siman and Charles Strouse with family

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Charles Strouse with cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Barbara Siman and Charles Strouse

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Charles Strouse Birthday Cake

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Charles Strouse with Cast and company

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Charles Strouse with Cast and company

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Charles Strouse with Cast and company

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Charles Strouse with grandchildren

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Charles Strouse with grandchildren, cast and company

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Charles Strouse with grandchildren, cast and company

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Charles Strouse with grandson

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Charles Strouse with grandson, cast and company

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Charles Strouse with grandson, cast and company

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Charles Strouse with Dominic Wintz

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Charles Strouse and cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Charles Strouse and cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Charles Strouse and Dominic Wintz with the cast

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Charles Strouse and Dominic Wintz

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Barbara Siman, Victoria Strouse, Charles Strouse and Granddaughter

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Barbara Siman, Victoria Strouse, Charles Strouse and Granddaughter

Photo Coverage: Charles Strouse Celebrates His Birthday at Children's Theatre of Cincinnati's Reading of IT'S A BIRD...IT'S A PLANE, IT'S SUPERMAN
Barbara Siman, Victoria Strouse, Charles Strouse and Granddaughter

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Walter McBride

From: https://www.broadwayworld.com/article/Photo-Coverage-Charles-Strouse-Celebrates-His-Birthday-at-Childrens-Theatre-of-Cincinnatis-Reading-of-ITS-A-BIRDITS-A-PLANE-ITS-SUPERMAN-20180609

A celebration for the famous comic book superhero Superman to be held this weekend

This weekend from June 7-10, the 40th annual Superman Celebration will be held in Metropolis, Illinois, this is a celebration of anything involved with the comic book superhero Superman.

According to the Metropolis tourism website, DC Comics adopted Metropolis as the official home of Superman in 1972. Located in proximity to the Ohio River, every summer people come to Metropolis for this celebration of a comic book legend.

According to the Metropolis website, There is a giant statue of Superman at the heart of Superman Square, and a statue of the character Lois Lane to honor actress Noel Nellie. In addition, there is little shops in the town Superman themed, there is something for any Superman fan, for any age group.

According to the Superman Celebration website,  There will be many celebrities featured, like John Haymes Newton who played the characters Superboy and Clark Kent on the “Superboy” television series, Jack O’Holloran who played the character Non in “Superman: The Movie”, Aaron Smolinski who appeared in multiple Superman movies, most notably as the character Baby Superman in “Superman: The Movie”, and a few other celebrities associated with the franchise.

Also according to the Superman Celebration website, There is a “Artists Alley” where you can meet famous authors and artists from the comic book business. like New York Times Best Selling and Eisner Award Winning “D.C. Comics’ Tiny Titans” cartoonist Art Baltazar, Alex Saviuk who is an American comic book artist who has worked in both DC and Marvel Comics, former writer and editor for DC Comics and current editor-in-chief for “Back Issue!” magazine Michael Eury, among many others.

There are tiny shops that have Superman themed items, and you can even meet The Man of Steel himself as he walks around town and greets his fans.

It is four days of everything Superman, that ends on Sunday with a costume contest. You can dress up as anyone you want and participate in the competition.

Can you handle four days of DC Comic’s most famous superhero? Take a trip to Southern Illinois and join in this year’s celebration.

Mary Ellen Greenburg can be reached at 581-2812, or [email protected]

From: https://www.dailyeasternnews.com/2018/06/07/a-celebration-for-the-famous-comic-book-superhero-superman-to-be-held-this-weekend/

Who does the best Batman voice in the DC universe? Superman

Here in Polygon’s offices, you’d be hard-pressed to find an employee who wouldn’t take a stab at imitating executive editor Chris Plante’s cheerful way of saying, “Oh, hello!” It’s a joy and a compliment, something quintessentially Chris Plante-ian.

It turns out the members of the Justice League do that too, except they like to imitate Batman’s overblown bravado and the gravelly growl. All of them.

[Warning: This post contains minor spoilers for Justice League #1.]

Any good superhero comic needs good fighting banter, and Scott Snyder (Batman, Dark Nights: Metal) can write it with the best of them. In Justice League #1, J’onn J’onzz, the Martian Manhunter, telepathically links the team so they can coordinate — and banter — while battling Neoanderthals across the globe.

First to get some digs in at Batman is the Flash, of course, who finishes the Caped Crusader’s snarky comeback before he can. Tom Napolitano’s lettering does a great job of conveying that Barry Allen has dropped into a different register when he says, “J’onn, I live in a cave. I know my damn rocks.”


Batman, the Flash, Wonder Woman and others in Justice League #1, DC Comics (2018).

Is that a bat-symbol shaped headlamp Batman is wearing? Yes, yes it is.
Scott Snyder, Jim Cheung/DC Comics

Next is Wonder Woman with arguably the best contribution to the pile-on, when she growls, “I’m the [censored] Wonder Woman.”

Snyder’s making a cheeky reference here to an infamous and much meme-ified moment in Frank Miller’s 2005 comic All-Star Batman and Robin #1. In a moment that has been repurposed for hundreds of image macros, parody fan drawings and joking videos, Robin says, “Who the hell are you anyway, giving out orders like this?”

Batman answers: “What, are you dense? Are you [redacted] or something? Who the hell do you think I am? I’m the goddamn Batman.”

Cyborg, on the other hand, refuses to play the game. Not to spare Batman’s feelings, of course, but because he’s in the presence of a master.

“Yeah, Clark’s Batman is so the best,” Flash agrees. Batman protests immediately, only to have Wonder Woman and Aquaman agree with Flash.

It’s canonical, folks, and it can’t be taken back. Superman is the best at doing impressions of Batman. But that makes sense.

We all know he has a pretty good ear.

From: https://www.polygon.com/comics/2018/6/7/17435920/justice-league-1-dc-comics-batman-voice-scott-snyder

Batman’s getting married and he picked the wrong best man

Batman and Catwoman are getting married this summer. I’m generally in favor of this plot development, even excited about it.

But this week’s Batman: Prelude to the Wedding: Nightwing vs. Hush #1 contains the most outrageous editorial decision the Batman office has made since Batman died while trying to shoot a gun at a god. And it’s transformed me from a level-headed critic to an old auntie who holds a three-decade grudge over “What they did to Our Richard.”

[Warning: This post contains spoilers for Batman: Prelude to the Wedding: Nightwing vs. Hush #1.]

Weddings are never simple

Especially when one of you is a world-famous thief and just got out of being wrongfully convicted for two hundred murders, and the other has a son from a previous union with a world-class assassin who only became a baby momma in the first place so that the kid could be raised to serve as a host for his own immortal granddad’s consciousness.

Picking a best man is an important choice, even in normal circumstances, and people are often worried about the feelings of whoever they didn’t pick. But even in a social environment where the Joker is likely to show up and try to murder everyone you know, I don’t think there is a bigger mistake possible than making Superman your best man over Dick Grayson.

Let’s look at the evidence, Batman

Exhibit A: Superman took you to a fast food restaurant for your bachelor party.


Superman, Batman, Nightwing and a robot Superman in Batman: Prelude to the Wedding: Nightwing vs. Hush #1, DC Comics (2018).

Tim Seeley, Travis Moore/DC Comics

Exhibit B: Nightwing came up with the idea of that crime-free pocket dimension fishing trip that you liked.


Batman, Nightwing and Superman in Batman: Prelude to the Wedding: Nightwing vs. Hush #1, DC Comics (2018).

Tim Seeley, Travis Moore/DC Comics

Exhibit C: When Hush, your childhood best friend-turned-plastic-surgeon-turned-supervillain-who-operated-on-his-own-face-to-look-just-like-you showed up to crash the party, Nightwing was the one who risked his life to chase him into the space between dimensions.


Dick Grayson (Nightwing) and Batman in Batman: Prelude to the Wedding: Nightwing vs. Hush #1, DC Comics (2018).

Tim Seeley, Travis Moore/DC Comics

And then you looked right into those baby blue eyes and told him that your best man was going to be someone other than himself, the first Robin, who you raised from his teenage years to adulthood as a surrogate parent.

And, OK, you picked Superman, who — I have to admit — is a solid choice for keeping the wedding free of interruptions (a major concern), keeping the rings safe (he owes you big time for keeping that kryptonite ring all those years) and giving a good speech at the reception. He’s going to do an adequate job under trying circumstances.

But no matter how much Batman: Prelude to the Wedding Nightwing vs. Hush #1 wants to frame Batman and Nightwing as friends who’ve drifted apart, their relationship is more than that. More than a first surrogate son and the first member of the wider Bat-family, Dick Grayson was Batman’s first partner, half of the Dynamic Duo, a partnership that’s nearly 80 years old.

Bruce, I can’t believe what you’ve done to Our Richard.

From: https://www.polygon.com/comics/2018/6/6/17425308/batman-wedding-nightwing-robin-superman

Exclusive Preview: in MAN OF STEEL #2, Superman toys with the truth behind his family’s absence

Last week, writer Brian Michael Bendis made a daring debut on Superman with Man of Steel #1, the start to what is sure to be an epic new journey starring the Earth’s most powerful defender of truth and justice.

This Wednesday, the epic continues with The Man of Steel #2, an issue featuring the legendary artists Doc Shaner and Steve Rude with a clutch assist from Jay Fabok. As the mysterious fires burning in Metropolis continue to vex Superman, another investigation comes to focus on Clark Kent himself. With his wife Lois and son Jon missing, how long can Superman continue to pretend like nothing has gone wrong at home?

Check out the Beat’s exclusive preview of The Man of Steel #2 after the jump.

Writer: Brian Michael Bendis
Artists: Doc Shaner (p 1-13), Steve Rude (p 16-24), Jay Fabok (p 14-15)
Colorist: Alex Sinclair
Letterer: Josh Reed

With an arsonist loose in Metropolis, Superman’s powers are almost useless in finding the culprit. And back at the Daily Planet, everyone wants to know what’s going on with Lois Lane. How can Clark hold on to the secret of what happened to Lois and Jon much longer?


Alex is the Managing Editor of the Comics Beat. He is also a freelance comics editor with previous credits at Papercutz. He is your go-to fella for creator interviews, conversations about comic book structure, and general DC Comics nerding. Currently geeking out over movies, too.

From: http://www.comicsbeat.com/exclusive-preview-in-man-of-steel-2-superman-toys-with-the-truth-behind-his-familys-absence/

Brian Michael Bendis’ new Superman comic is here, and he’s got questions about Krypton

The Cleveland-born Bendis was back in the state for his brother’s wedding. During his visit, an old friend invited him to the downtown Cleveland library, the one he had visited frequently as a child, to check out an exhibit.

The exhibit? “Superman: From Cleveland to Krypton.” Bendis felt it was a sign.

At that moment, few knew that Bendis was contemplating a jump to DC Comics after almost two decades as one of the top writers at Marvel. But there he was, in his hometown – which also happens to be the birthplace of the Superman comic and its creators, Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster – surrounded by curvy S’s and capes.

Bendis was so moved by the seemingly spontaneous superhero moment that he recorded it on video for his wife (convinced she wouldn’t believe him) and later posted it to his YouTube channel. The comic book gods had spoken: Bendis knew it was time to take a leap, up, up and away to an uncertain but exciting future.

“I went through that exhibition and I said, ‘Yeah, that’s it, I’m doing it,'” he said.

Though his first Superman story debuted in the 1,000th issue of Action Comics, Bendis’ full-time duties kicked off last week with the release of “The Man of Steel,” a six-issue miniseries (the first issue illustrated by Ivan Reis) that is a continuation of the story Bendis began to tell in Action No. 1,000.

Bendis knew he would create a villain for Superman. The superhero needed a new rival, someone who could get under his impenetrable skin. That villain, Rogol Zaar, appears in the Action issue and “The Man of Steel” No. 1.

To research what tricks a villain would have to have up his sleeve to make Superman uncharacteristically emotional, Bendis went to the best source. But while diving into decades of Superman comics, one question kept coming back to him: What’s up with the destruction of Krypton?

Bendis ran the idea by fan-favorite Superman writer/artist Dan Jurgens, who just finished the writing run on “Action Comics.”

“I called up Dan and I said, ‘Should I ever do a story about what really happened on Krypton?’ And Jurgens goes, ‘Why, what really happened on Krypton?’ I knew from (his) inquisitive tone that (I) was on to something,” Bendis said.

Once “The Man of Steel” wraps, Bendis’ writing time will be split between “Action Comics” and a new “Superman” series. Bendis says “Superman” will feature the biggest stories in the DC universe – adventures only Supes could handle. “Action Comics” will have more of a focus on Clark Kent, with a look at his life as a reporter.

From: http://gazette.com/brian-michael-bendis-new-superman-comic-is-here-and-hes-got-questions-about-krypton/article/1627073

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