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DC Comics Joins Forces With Young Adult Authors

DC Ink will begin with two graphic novels: one featuring Harley Quinn, a supervillain from the Batman universe, written by Mariko Tamaki and drawn by Steve Pugh, and one with Mera, the regal, longtime love interest of Aquaman, written by Danielle Paige. (No artist has been announced for that project.) DC Zoom will make its debut with “DC Super Hero Girls: Search for Atlantis,” by Shea Fontana and Yancey Labat.

If that sounds like a lineup heavy on heroines, there is a reason.

“If you look at readership in middle grade and Y.A. in general, you’ll see a swing on the side of female readers,” said Michele Wells, the vice president for content strategy at DC.

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One of the first two graphic novels from DC Ink, for young adults, will feature Mera, the longtime love interest of Aquaman.

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DC Entertainment

While staple-bound comic books have traditionally appealed to an audience of male readers, graphic novels have a more diverse readership.

“You’ll see that Gene Luen Yang book, ‘Superman Smashes the Klan,’ will be for both,” Ms. Wells said. “If anyone can make a bold statement with Superman, it is Gene Yang.”

The softcover Zoom graphic novels will cost $9.99 and run 128 pages, while the Ink books will be priced at $16.99 for 192 pages. The stories will be free from the elaborate continuity of previous superhero tales.

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“They are character studies, not necessarily superhero stories,” Ms. Chase said.

The adventures meant for middle graders will delve into characters who are figuring out the world around them, including dealing with parents and teachers, she said. The young adult graphic novels will focus more on questions of personal identity, with budding heroes deciding what paths they will take.

Mr. Pearson, whose Kingdom Keepers series follows teenagers who are trying to keep villains from taking over a Disney theme park, has signed on to write a “Super Sons” graphic novel. It will feature Jonathan Kent and Damian Wayne, the sons of Clark Kent (Superman) and Bruce Wayne (Batman), who have appeared in various DC Comics.

Jonathan Kent, whose mother is Lois Lane, does not rely on his superstrength, Mr. Pearson said. “He’s also got a lot of Lois in him: He’s thoughtful, investigative and a reader,” he said. “He wishes he had his dad’s superpowers, but he’s at 50 or 60 percent. That’s fun to play with.”

In his stories, Mr. Pearson said, he will tackle climate change and introduce a character, Candice, who discovers that she belongs to an African dynasty.

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Mr. Pearson said he welcomed the chance to help bring in a new generation of readers.

“I have an older brother who was obsessed with comics,” he said. “They were all over the house. In many ways, they gave me a gateway into reading.”


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From: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/04/business/dc-comics-joins-forces-with-young-adult-authors.html

Shame Of Steel: 15 Cringeworthy Things About Superman Fans Wish They Could Forget

Superman is known as one of America’s favorite superheroes in the world of comics. “Superman” has even become a term in it of itself, meaning someone’s real-life hero that people call each other and write songs about. Kids play with action figures of him and adults even collect figurines of him. It is also a popular character to dress up as for Halloween and even comic conventions. But it’s not all daisies and roses when it comes to Superman. Real fans know what lies in his past, but most choose to ignore what he has done and focus on the good.

So Superman started out with the powers of super strength and super speed. Then in the Silver Age he gained more powers such as enhanced vision and hearing. These powers continued to grow and become stronger, making him almost invincible. With a character that is virtually unstoppable, it is up to the writers to get creative and think of new stories. That is when story arcs like dating a mermaid and turning him into a centaur come into play. And those aren’t even the creepiest things about Superman. So here are 15 of the creepiest things about Superman that fans choose to ignore.

15. CENTAUR SUPERMAN

So somewhere out in the world of DC Comics, there is a centaur Superman. Why you ask? Well, why not? The real reason is DC wanted to do a modernized Greek mythology story. This story is called “Whom Gods Destroy” and it is a four-issue mini-series in an alternate history where the Nazis have won.

So Superman is an evil centaur who hasn’t aged and is in love with Lois Lane, so most of that is true to canon, except for the centaur part. In the story, The Man of Steel and Lois go onto German soil to search for Lana. One thing leads to another and Lois gets turned into Wonder Woman and Superman gets transformed into a evil centaur by Circe. The plot twist is the the are just pawns in Zeus and Hera’s chess game.

14. SPANKING

Spanking in comics is always creepy to witness no matter the reason or context. For some reason, the Golden Age of comics that started in the ’40s and became the foundation for comics everywhere is filled with spanking. We see it a lot in Wonder Woman and even in Batman comics, and Superman was no exception.

The way the Man of Steel liked to spank women, and often, might be crossing the line of the fetish borderline. Many of the women that he has spanked have been because he was punishing them in a nonsexual way. Sort of like how one would punish a child, except these are grown women. There are also cases of Superman when he was younger as Superboy getting spanked as well.

13. THE MULLET

The ’90s were a time of flannels and bad hair styles. Superman was no exception to these trends in this era. He was a victim of the the famous business-in-the-front-and-party-in-the-back mullet. And what is even more creepy is that the appearance of the new hairstyle lead him to even weirder fashion paths including some a bright blue electric suit and powers later on.

Superman has had long hair before. But it was the famous Wonder Woman cover that really put an emphasis on a full-on mulleted Superman, drawn by Brian Bolland. Is it said that they wanted his hair to look handsome, and originally it was long, and then eventually turned into a mullet. There were even rumors that the mullet would appear on Superman in the Justice League film, but we got the moustache instead because of the actor’s contract.

12. MERMAID LOVER

It takes a lot of creativity to come up with new adventures for the Man of Steel, so we give the creators the benefit of the doubt when not everything written about Superman is quality. The storyline of Clark meeting and falling for a mermaid, without knowing she is a mermaid is not one of the better story arcs.

Clark went to Metropolis University and met a lady named Lori who was in a wheelchair with a blanket covering her legs. The quickly fell in love, and still Clark was unaware of what was under the blanket the whole time. Clark soon asked Lori to marry him (because this was in the ‘50s and ’60s) but she declined. Upon further investigation, Clark finally discovered that he had been in love and purposed to a mermaid the whole time. This is one creepy love story fans like to forget.

11. TINY SUPERMAN

Tiny versions of things can be cute, like a tiny puppy but maybe not a tiny Superman. The fact that Superman is able to release a tiny version of himself from his hand is just creepy. This fact originated in 1958 in the comics “Superman’s New Power!” Being almost invincible was not enough for the writers, Superman needs a new and never before seen power!

In the issue, the Man of Steel loses his superpowers when he discovers a spaceship from dealing with complications from an earthquake. In exchange for losing his powers, he gains the ability to shoot a tiny version of himself that has his normal powers. Citizens of Metropolis think tiny Superman is cute, so regular-size Superman gets jealous and tries to kill it. A creepy ending to a creepy story.

10. HE’S SCARED OF VAMPIRES

Like most superheroes, Superman has weaknesses. His most well-known weakness is kryptonite, but it goes deeper than that. Most fans like to ignore the fact that Superman is easily hypnotized by vampires, and why would we be proud of this bizarre fact regarding our superhero? It is weird and unbecoming of the powerful Kryptonian. The story of how he becomes hypnotized by vampires is even creepier.

The Man of Steel is susceptible to magic, and according to DC, magic includes blood-sucking vampires. He encountered many different vampires in his life that fans usually don’t mention when they talk about Superman’s achievements. One of the vampires is called Crucifer. Crucifer was able to hypnotize the Man of Steel and drink his blood. Although he did not enjoy the taste of his blood, he still drank it and by doing so, was able to have control over Clark.

9. HE KILLED A PREGNANT LOIS LANE

Who kills the love of their life when they are pregnant with their child? Superman does. This all started with the video game Injustice: Gods Among Us. In the game, the lines of good and evil are blurred and Superman turns evil, so they needed a motive for his suddenly bad behavior. They decided to create an origins story, and in that story, Superman kills a pregnant Lois Lane.

In Clark’s defense, he didn’t know he was really killing Lois. He thought he was killing Doomsday. In the story, Joker releases fear toxins that make Superman think Lois Lane is Doomsday. The Joker also attaches a nuclear launch to Lois’ heart, and once her heart stopped beating, the attack was launched. This is not one of Superman’s finer moments in the DC universe. He let the Joker, of all villains, get the best of him.

8. HE CAUSED LUTHOR’S BALDNESS

Lex Luthor and Superman have been frenemies for the longest of times. Luthor likes to take over the world and doesn’t have good hair, and Superman likes to save the world and has good hair. But it could be theorized that the main reason they don’t get along, despite all the bad things Luthor has done, is because Luthor blames The Man of Steel for his baldness.

Lex Luthor wasn’t always bald, he started out with a full head of hair. The story behind his baldness is that the original Superman artist Joe Shuster was so overworked from his job that he forgot to draw hair on Luthor in a comic strip. Then 20 years later, they gave Luthor a reason that he was bald. When they were younger, Luthor set his lab on fire. Superman blew it out but created a chemical reaction that made Luthor bald permanently.

7. VEGETARIAN

Superman is technically powered by the sun. This means his energy and sustainability is solar powered. Being solar powered also means he doesn’t need to eat food. This has been in effect for him since post-Crisis. You have probably seen Clark eat once and a while, and it is mainly to keep up appearances and actually enjoys eating food.

What is weird is that Superman has decided to become a vegetarian, even though he doesn’t need food in the first place. He is similar to plants in that they rely heavily on the sun to live. Another reason why being a vegetarian is weird for Superman is that he is an “American” superhero. Most red-blooded Americans were shocked to find him a vegetarian. Americans are known for their love of meat, and being a vegetarian is not considered an American tradition to some.

6. ROBOT SUPERMEN

So in the Silver Age in comics, Superman had a whole army of himself made out of robots. What’s even creepier is that the robots didn’t stop at Superman though, he even had a couple robots of his human identity Clark as well as Superboy, Supergirl and Linda Lee.

He created these robots so he could be in more than one place at a time. The robots possessed only a fraction of the Man of Steel’s strength though. The robots of Supergirl were created so that she can fight crime and still have her presence in school without ruining her secret identity. The robots were brought back post-Crisis too so Superman could police the whole earth with his robot army. Who polices the Superman robot army though?

5. SUPER TWINS

“The Amazing Story of Superman-Red and Superman-Blue!” is as compelling as a story as you think: not very. In this story of Superman, Clark is apparently a greedy genius because he invents a machine to enhance his intelligence. The side effect is it makes him a clone, or twin. One comes out red, another comes out blue and they decide to name themselves after the color of their costumes: Superman-Red and Superman-Blue (how creative).

The twins team up to combine their intelligence and use it to fix thing like an enlarging gun so they can enlarge the city of Kandor. They also create an underwater city for the Atlanteans. This story arc of the twins is something fans definitely like to forget from how creepy it is and out of the norm for the Man of Steel.

4. FILM STAR

Superman and Big Barda make a Porno Action Comics

Yes, that’s right. In the world of DC Comics, there is an adult film starring Superman and Big Barda. In Superman’s defense, like most, he didn’t know it was happening. This creepy event happens, of course, in the Golden and Silver Ages of comics. It doesn’t get too much attention from the fans and other forms of media, but it still exists out there.

The story goes that Big Barda was brainwashed and forced to record resque footage. Sleez did the brainwashing who is a former henchmen of Darkseid. Superman also got mixed into the brainwashing and Sleez made them made a “film” together. So next time you see anything involving the Man of Steel, you can think to yourself, Superman made a dirty film.

3. HOOKING UP WITH MORTALS

This is a theory that rustles around with fans but writers of Superman forget about. So Superman has incredible strength, laser vision and is an alien from another planet. According to those calculations, any mortal woman would probably get crushed should they ever get intimate. On the other hand, Superman has control of his powers, but is it possible every time in the heat of the moment he had complete control? It just doesn’t add up.

There are actually a lot of analysis written in regards to Clark having sex with mortals. Many people that think that there are too many factors at play and the fact that he hasn’t killed Lois yet is incredible and/or impossible (if any of this was possible in the first place). Either way, having sex with an alien is some real next level stuff.

2. TURNED LOIS LANE BLACK

In November of 1970, Superman’s girlfriend Lois Lane turns black for a day and the title of the issue is “I Am Curious (Black).” The ’70s were a different time, but that doesn’t excuse this creepy plot in DC comics. Lois wants to turn change her race for a day merely out of curiosity and she asks Clark to find a way to do it for her.

Little Africa is considered the “ghetto” part of Metropolis which is even racist in the name. But Lois wanted to write a story about life in Little Africa so she goes into a transformation machine provided by Clark. Once she turns black, she goes on a adventure in Little Africa, meets friends and even saves a life. How nice and wholesome…

1. PINK KRYPTONITE

Superman Exposed To Pink Kryptonite in Supergirl

The true fans know there is more than one type of kryptonite and also the true fans like to forget what the pink kryptonite does. Green is the most well-known but there are also red, gold, white, blue, yellow, black, silver, purple and … pink. Pink kryptonite appeared in the Supergirl series and had a strange effect on the Man of Steel.

The issue does not flat out say what it does but it definitely implies that it makes Superman attracted to members of the same sex. Now there is nothing wrong with being gay, but why did they make pink kryptonite make Superman have gay tendencies? In the issue, they used the pink kryptonite as a satire or comical approach which isn’t the politically correct way to approach sexuality either.

From: https://www.cbr.com/bad-superman-facts/

Brian Michael Bendis Is Ushering In A New Era Of Superman Comics For DC

After months of speculation about what Brian Michael Bendis was up to at DC now that he’s left Marvel, the publisher announced today that Bendis is taking over writing duties for three Superman titles, resurrecting Jinxworld, and launching an all-new imprint.
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From: https://www.kotaku.com.au/2018/02/brian-michael-bendis-is-ushering-in-a-new-era-of-superman-comics-for-dc/

Marvel veteran Brian Michael Bendis to write Superman comics for DC

Veteran Marvel comic writer Brian Michael Bendis is taking on one of DC’s flagship titles: Superman.

Back in November, DC Comics shocked fans with the announcement that they had signed Bendis to an exclusive deal. Bendis had previously spent most of his 20-year career at Marvel, where he created now-iconic characters like Jessica Jones and Miles Morales and wrote stories that provided some of the blueprints for the Marvel Cinematic Universe. DC has kept its plans for Bendis close to the chest, but it seemed likely DC had offered him something big since they were able to entice him away from Marvel. Indeed, the publisher officially announced on Thursday that Bendis would be writing their biggest character of all.

As EW first revealed earlier this month, Bendis’ first published story for DC will come in the massive Action Comics #1000 anniversary issue, alongside a slew of other stories about the Man of Steel from DC’s other biggest talents. From there, Bendis will write a six-issue weekly miniseries called Man of Steel, set to launch at the end of May. Much like John Byrne’s 1986 miniseries of the same name, Man of Steel will revisit Superman’s origin story (funny enough, Byrne was also a big-name talent recruited from Marvel to reinvent DC’s signature character). Bendis will even introduce a new villain with mysterious knowledge about the destruction of Superman’s home planet Krypton. The series is also set to feature an all-star art roster, including Ivan Reis, Evan “Doc” Shaner, Ryan Sook, Kevin Maguire, Adam Hughes, and Jason Fabok.

After Man of Steel, Bendis will take the writing reins on both flagship Superman books, Action Comics and Superman. Following Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason’s acclaimed DC Rebirth run on Superman, that series will reboot with a new issue #1 and will allow Bendis to continue the story threads started by both the Tomasi/Gleason run and his own Man of Steel. Then, after a three-month break following that big anniversary extravaganza, Action Comics will resume with issue #1001 in July. Bendis will write that series as well, with a focus on “character-focused” stories and exploring Clark Kent’s role at the Daily Planet. Bendis knows a thing or two about newspaper stories after writing Marvel series The Pulse, which explored Jessica Jones’ life at the Daily Bugle. But it’s a bit of a break from the Rebirth status quo, which previously found Superman abandoning the big city of Metropolis in favor of a farm life with Lois Lane and their son Jonathan. Bendis’ Superman will be illustrated by Ivan Reis, and Action Comics will have art from Gleason.

On top of all the Superman, Bendis will also be curating a custom imprint for DC. There aren’t many specific details yet, but it’s set to launch in 2018 and will feature Bendis’ favorite DC characters in “very unique and unusual situations,” on top of new characters created specifically for the imprint. The library of Jinxworld, Bendis’ previous imprint of gritty noir comics like Jinx and Powers, will find a new home at DC as well.

Man of Steel #1 is set to hit stores on May 30. The six covers will form an interconnected image by Reis and Joe Prado; check out an early preview below.

From: http://ew.com/books/2018/02/01/marvel-veteran-brian-michael-bendis-to-write-superman-comics-for-dc/

Exclusive: Bendis To Write Superman, Revive Jinxworld, And Oversee New Custom Imprint At DC Comics

Award-winning fan-favorite writer Brian Michael Bendis has joined DC Entertainment, and will be taking over writing duties on DC Comics’ monthly Superman and Action Comics titles. In addition, DC will re-release Bendis’ acclaimed creator-owned Jinxworld comics and publish new content from him as well. Before his run on the main Superman titles begins, Bendis also has a major miniseries coming to shake up the status quo for the Kryptonian hero. I have an exclusive first look at the cover art for that miniseries, plus a long and in-depth interview with Bendis, so read on for all of the details!

Brian Michael Bendis

Bendis is perhaps best know for helping launching the Marvel Comics’ Ultimate imprint, including the monthly titles Ultimate Spider-Man and Ultimate X-Men, as well as his Eisner Award-winning writing on the MAX imprint title Alias (on which the hit Netflix series Jessica Jones is based) and the regular monthly series Daredevil. He is also widely recognized for his original creator-owned work, including the popular Jinx and Powers.

In early November last year, DC announced an exclusive multi-year deal with Bendis beginning in 2018. Within days of that announcement, Marvel ceased publication of the author’s original titles, causing instant speculation about the fate of those books. A week later, however, Bendis hinted at what most everyone already suspected, when he tweeted out a statement noting the end of publication by Marvel didn’t mean “cancellation,” but rather “switching publishers.” Today, I can confirm that the exclusive deal with DC includes all of Bendis’ Jinxworld content, both re-printing and publication of new stories.

Speaking with me about his new exclusive deal with DC Entertainment, Bendis told me, “I’m very excited about this, it’s a very big deal.” He continued, “When I was first approached by DC, there was a lot of speculation about what I would do and what characters I’m interested in. But the one at the top of my list — and it surprised some people — but at the top of my list was Superman.”

Bendis will contribute to Action Comics #1000 on April 18, after which DC will release his 6-issue miniseries Man of Steel starting May 30. Published on a weekly basis, Man of Steel will include art by such comic book luminaries as Ivan Reis, Evan “Doc” Shaner, Ryan Sook, Kevin Maguire, Adam Hughes, and Jason Fabok. Check out this first look at the original pencil art for four of the six covers for Man of Steel

Connected cover art for issues #1-4 of the DC Comics miniseries “Man Of Steel,” by Ivan Reis and Joe Prado

The journey to writing Superman actually took Bendis through Superman’s literal birthplace. The character was created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster while they lived in Cleveland, and the state is very proud of that history. Bendis is, too. “I’m a little Jewish boy from Cleveland,” he said, “and my connection to Superman is very, very deep, genetically.”

That connection was central to Bendis’ eventual acceptance of the DC deal. He explained, “It just so happened I was back in Cleveland for the first time in years for my brother’s wedding, when the offer was put forth [by DC]. I went to visit my friend John [Skrtic] who runs the Cleveland public library — we grew up together — and he had a Superman exhibition. And I walked in there and it was like the universe was speaking to me, telling me ‘Oh you’ve got to do this!’ And it flooded back to me in the biggest way possible, and here we are.”

DC’s offer for Bendis to start work with such a seminal moment in Superman’s publication history came as a bit of a surprise.

“My first appearance in DC Comics will be Action Comics #1000,” Bendis said. “It was a lovely offer from [DC Comics Co-Publisher] Dan DiDio when we were discussing my plans and what I could or couldn’t do. He called me up the next day and he goes, ‘I don’t want to be greedy or rush you, but we happen to have this once in a lifetime Superman situation going on with Action Comics #1000.’ And I’m desperately in love with the DC anniversary editions, I’ve always been in love with them. Superman #400 for example is one of the best comics ever made, it’s such a celebration of art.”

Cover art for Superman #400

DiDio’s offer ended up framed in a larger context that sold Bendis on moving faster than expected on this entry into the DC universe. As the writer continued explaining, “Dan goes, ‘There is a possibility we could give you a first shot to write in Action Comics #1000, and make it really a big part of the Superman legacy and our legacy. What if we put our foot down and say this is a big part of the character, where we’re headed is a big thing and we believe in it, so there’s no better place to put it than in Action Comics #1000 with our publisher Jim Lee drawing it.’ And I was like, of course I’m going to say yes to this!”

But lest you think he’s merely talking about a small contribution to a special event issue that won’t factor into his later work with the character, Bendis wants you to know that’s not the case. “In that first story,” he said, “it’s not just some random backup story or flight of fancy. It is a major chapter in what we’re doing, with some really big bombs we’re dropping in Superman’s life — and two of them happen right there in Action Comics #1000. So it’s a huge tease of what we’re doing and what’s coming up in Superman’s life.”

With his first step into the DC world coming at such a special point in Superman’s publication history, and taking such a huge step toward significant changes in the character’s life, Bendis was obviously under a great deal of pressure. “Handing in that script was as nerve racking as anything I’ve ever done,” he admits. “Not only was it my first statement on this universe I’ve just joined, but it’s in the middle of this amazing anniversary filled with not only the greatest comic book creators of all time, but literally my heroes. There are people there who I look at in complete awe, and it was an honor just to be asked for those ten pages, let alone the first ten pages of what will hopefully be a long and successful run.”

As for his Man of Steel miniseries, Bendis hints at significant upheaval ahead for Superman. “It’s a big weekly Man of Steel event,” he said, continuing, “It’s six issues, and I’m writing all of them. They’re telling the giant new story that’s the status quo, what’s going to be going on with Superman and Metropolis and everything around him. Again, it’s following up on the big bombs we drop not only in Action Comics #1000, but following up all of those beats and digging in even deeper.”

The lineup of artists involved in the miniseries is enough to humble any writer, as Bendis makes clear. “Every single issue is being drawn by one of the great DC artists working today, who are also some of the greatest DC artists of all time,” he noted. “I’m very honored to be doing my first project with all of these artists I’ve never worked with before, who I think are amazing. The only artist I’ve worked with before in the run is Kevin Macguire, and I wouldn’t do this without him, because I think he’s one of the greatest DC artists of all time. But then I get to launch with Ivan Reis, Doc Shaner, Jason Fabok, and others who’ve done amazing runs with the character or who’ve been waiting to do very special thing with the character. I’m very honored they all said yes to this.”

While keeping as much secret as he could, Bendis was willing to give us a little hint about what to expect from the miniseries. “The Man of Steel story will debut a huge new villain, a blockbuster villain who connects deeply to Superman’s origin story and to his birthright,” Bendis revealed. “We’re going to dig in very hard, this is one of my goals, to be a additive to Superman as possible. The characters we debut right away, including this new villain, will send ripples of horror across the entire Superman family and beyond!”

After Man of Steel’s publication, Bendis will take over writing duties on the monthly titles Superman and Action Comics. The Superman monthly will relaunch with a new issue #1 on July 11, while Action Comics picks up with issue #1001 on July 25, and each will have a different approach and tone. While the main Superman title will be an adventure-driven book, Action Comics will delve into Clark Kent’s daily life.

But when the two regular monthlies pick back up, things won’t be the same in Superman’ world. “The fallout of Man of Steel #6 is enormous,” Bendis insists. “It’s some of the biggest status quo changes to Superman literally since Crisis. So we’ll be launching Superman with a brand new #1, and that’s going to be very Superman-focused and big DC action stories. Action Comics will be launching with #1001, I’m very happy to say, and that will be focused more on Clark and Metropolis and the Daily Planet, and how the world of Superman effects the world of DC.”

Bendis sounds energized as he lays out the extent of his plans, and credits the creative freedom of his deal with DC for helping galvanize his imagination. “It’s pretty elaborate plotting and I’m excited about it,” he said. “It’s all new toys, all new characters — we’ll be introducing a lot of new characters, both heroes and villains. DC set up a situation where my partnership with them is so exciting, it inspires me to create as many new thing as possible. And Superman is long overdue for it.”

That said, it’s important to understand this will not be a “reboot” of the character or his world, something that might disturb some fans and purists. “For those who are worried, they should not be,” assures Bendis. “The last runs on Superman by Dan Jurgens and Peter Tomasi and Pat Gleason have been phenomenal runs, and my run will be following their runs. We’re not throwing anything out, we’re not abandoning anything, we’re following what’s been going on and taking it to surprising new areas.”

I asked Bendis how much his Jewish background factors into his particular approach and vision for Superman. Specifically, Superman was original conceived as representing a great deal of Jewish social ideals and opinion, not to mention quite obvious storytelling influence from the story of Moses and the use of the name “El” (and the associated implications of the Hebrew l?med to “L”). Later, however, stories focused on Christian symbolism and treated Superman as comparable to Jesus. I always favored the original approach, and wondered if Bendis would return the character to those traditional roots once more.

Bendis replied, “I can honestly tell you the choices we’ve made and bring to Superman are deeply connected to his origins. I don’t want to say too much right now, but it’s a reflection of where he came from and the world we live in now.”

That’s great news, in my opinion, and I think it will help bring a fresh tonal approach allowing readers to appreciate and consider the character and his relevance in important ways both highly traditional and uniquely modern.

Cover art for Action Comics #1000

Prior to the release of Man of Steel, Bendis will also contribute to the special comic book event DC Nation #0 on May 2. And hang on to your hats, DC fans, because joining the author for that story is one of the greatest and most iconic artists to ever work at DC Comics. Bendis eagerly told me, “In between Action Comics #1000 and Man of Steel #1, there will be another special chapter, this one by myself and — I’m so excited to say these words out loud — very special art by José Luis García-López, who came out of semi-retirement to do this with me.”

García-López’s artwork is so famous, even if you don’t read comic books you’ve almost surely seen his DC superhero renderings somewhere in your life. His art is licensed for toys packaging, books, posters, clothing, and all manner of DC merchandise.

Said Bendis, “He’s one of my bucket list names, someone I never thought I’d ever get to work with. To go right from Jim Lee, who was also at the top of my bucket list, to José Luis García-López, was amazing. I can’t tell you enough what a lovely human being he is, and how nice it is even to have just met him, let alone have the experience to work with him.”

As for the relevance of DC Nation #0 to the rest of what’s to come for Superman, Bendis proclaimed, “That storyline will set up a lot of what’s going to be going on in Action Comics, we’ll dig really deep into what’s going on at the Daily Planet, and introduce some new cast members at the Daily Planet and some new villains in Metropolis.”

Expanding the scope and detail in Superman’s city is crucial to Bendis’ long term planning. “I have a lot of goals for Superman,” he says, “one of which is to help turn Metropolis into something as provocative and unique as Gotham City is. I think everyone will agree Gotham is one of the most built and best places in all of fictional cities, and Metropolis should follow suit. So Action Comics and DC Nation will be the first hints at how we’re going to be building up Metropolis. Both in people and in culture, it’ll be more than just the place Superman lives. We’ll be taking a good look at a lot of place we haven’t looked at before.”

(Fun side scoop: Batman fans will be interested to know DC Nation #0 includes a story about the Joker learning of Batman and Catwoman’s imminent nuptials.)

Summarizing his feelings about taking over the direction of Superman at DC, Bendis grew philosophical. “Writing Superman in today’s day and age is a such powerful experience. We live in a world where we’ve heard, ‘Truth, justice, and the American way’ our whole lives, right? But this is the first time those things are really not to be taken for granted.” Continuing, he noted with regret, “Truth has been revealed to not be as black and white as we thought it was; justice is sadly not always for everybody; and the American Dream, the American way of everybody coming here to pursue the idea that they can live a safe and healthy life — these are ideas we always took for granted, but now we don’t. No matter where you are politically, we just don’t take these things for granted anymore.”

Bringing it all back to the point at hand, Bendis concluded, “And now I think it’s time Superman stand up and give us that hope we always want from him. It’s a great thing to be writing a character who exudes hope at a time when people really, really need it.”

As excited as fans will be to hear about Bendis’ plans for Superman, they’ll be equally enthused to find out what’s in store for Jinxworld.

“The big headline here,” Bendis asserted, “is this isn’t just DC grabbing some of my books and giving me a safe place. They came and offered me a genuine partnership. They’ve offered creator-owned books before, but what they’re doing here is something brand new for them and for comics. Hopefully it’s a sign of things to come in the future.”

Explaining what precisely the deal entails, Bendis said, “They’re going to take my entire library — and by mine I mean the stuff I own with my co-creators and collaborators — from Powers to Jinx, and to Scarlet and others, and we’ll be releasing it all digitally and in print through Jinxworld, through DC Comics.”

Detectives Christian Walker and Deena Pilgrim from “Power”

What exactly makes this deal so different from past situations for creator-owned content? “Two things are happening that are unique to this partnership and to how comics usually work,” Bendis told me. “Number one, DC is going to be hosting Jinxworld as a whole,” he said, “so everything I’ve ever done in the creator-owned world will be coming to DC. And on top of that, we’ll be debuting brand new material, brand new series that I think will be exciting for the marketplace and for fans, stuff I haven’t tried before and stuff people have been begging us for. We’ll be debuting that all this year.”

“And number two,” Bendis continued, “separate from Jinxworld, is that I will be hosting and curating an imprint, a custom imprint not unlike what Gerard Way is doing with [DC imprint] Young Animal. It’s going to be a select series of special comics, and we’ll debut what those are later in the year. I’ll be writing some of those and curating the others, but they’ll all be under this imprint and add a very special flavor to the DC Universe. I’m happy to say it will star some of my all-time favorite DC characters in unique situations, and that I could not be more excited for.”

Art for Brian Michael Bendis’ Jinxworld

So this multi-year deal between Brian Michael Bendis and DC is wide ranging and gives the writer not only a great deal of control over the future of Superman’s stories and world within the established DC comic book universe, but also carves out a large corner for Bendis to continue developing his original content while also overseeing a whole line of additional stories and content involving a variety of creators and characters.

“Before, I had put my deep love of the DC universe aside just because I didn’t need it for work,” Bendis told me. “But now to open that box and have everything come flying out, the things I love so much from my childhood, from last week, from ten years ago, I can’t wait to dive in and explore all of it.”

The writer says the changes to Jinxworld were inevitable even before his deal with DC. “I’d already announced I had dedicated this year to creating as many new things as I could,” Bendis point out, “so when publishers like DC came to me, they were very interested in what those new things were and what they could do to be in business with them. So my itch to create new things and DC’s itch for me to come over here kind of mirrored and matched, and here we are!”

Readers, however, needn’t fear any radical revamping of their favorite Jinxworld titles due to the change of publishers. “For most people buying the books, they won’t feel any difference,” Bendis assured me. “But behind the scenes, this partnership is very different. Marvel was a gracious and very cool about publishing my stuff through Icon, but what DC is doing for Jinxworld is a much more robust partnership. They’re backing it, they’re marketing it, they’re treating it like it’s their books, and I’m very excited about that. When people see the size and scope of the ambition, even the most die-hard fans are going to be like, ‘Well all right, look who’s coming through!’ “

Jinxworld’s “The United States of Murder Inc.”

This is part of a much larger plan by DC to reshape the company’s approach to publishing and relationships with creators and their content, adopting a more “cradle-to-grave” mindset toward the use of their products for existing and new audiences.

For his own part, Bendis revealed a major personal motivation was to challenge and scare himself. “And then I landed into the hands of the best possible partners you could have for such a thing,” he said. “When you roll up your sleeves and say, ‘Okay I’m going to scare myself,’ you do want someone to have your back. And DC and Warner Bros, and Diane Nelson and Dan DiDio have been unbelievable partners.They’re very dedicate to really taking a look at the comic book community and market, and making it special.

Bendis’ enthusiasm for the partnership isn’t merely rhetoric — in an era where mass media and mobile platforms offer more constant entertainment options and artistic content than ever before in human history, Bendis feels he’s part of a new dynamic that will reinvigorate the comic market and remind the world where the biggest movie and TV genres got their start. “What people who make comics do is as unique, as special, as anything that goes on in any part of the culture,” Bendis insists. “We’re all dedicated to making sure people understand that comics are where it all starts, and comics are still the most exciting place to read about these characters and hear about these characters.”

Providing a big-picture summation of today’s news, Bendis remarked, “These are the big pieces, and it shows how ambitious we are right at the start. We’re starting with Superman, and here comes Jinxworld, and then right after Jinxworld we’ll be debuting the new imprint, which will feature both new characters and classic characters. DC has given me the thumbs-up to be as additive in every corner of the DC universe that I can get my hands on.”

Bendis concluded his thoughts by saying, “What’s going on at DC and Marvel couldn’t be more exciting right now, and by summertime I think comic book stores are going to be the most exciting places in our culture. I hope people get a sense of all of this, and go into a comic book store and see if there’s something for them.”

I’ll have more stories coming soon with additional exclusive details about the future of DC Comics — from new imprints, YA content, this year’s 25th anniversary of Vertigo, and exciting details about new prestige imprints that will have fans jumping for joy.

Stay tuned for all of that and more, and meanwhile enjoy these additional closeups of the first four covers from the upcoming Brian Michael Bendis miniseries Man of Steel

Connected cover art for issues #1-2 of the DC Comics miniseries “Man Of Steel,” by Ivan Reis and Joe Prado

Connected cover art for issues #3-4 of the DC Comics miniseries “Man Of Steel,” by Ivan Reis and Joe Prado

So you have all of the news, now let me know what you think of today’s news, dear readers, by sounding off in the comments below!

Box office figures and tallies based on data via Box Office Mojo , Rentrak, and TheNumbers.

Follow me on Twitter, on Google+and on Quora.  Read my blog.

From: https://www.forbes.com/sites/markhughes/2018/02/01/exclusive-bendis-to-write-superman-revive-jinxworld-and-oversee-new-custom-imprint-at-dc-comics/

Gold, diamonds, even rare Superman comic — suspected Miami conman peddled them all

A former Miami postal carrier will soon stand trial on allegations he suckered coworkers and customers along his route into paying him over $4 million — by promising fantastic riches from gold and diamond mines in Africa.

And now he’s also suspected in a scam sale of the most famous comic book ever.

Prosecutors on Tuesday revealed that Lawyer Stanley is also being accused of stealing thousands of dollars from an elderly veteran who was promised a copy of Action Comics No. 1, the legendary 1938 debut of Superman. The comic is considered the most valuable in history. One copy sold for $3.2 million three years ago.

Stanley, Miami-Dade prosecutors said, promised a copy for only $24,000. The would-be collector — who suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder from his service in the Vietnam War — paid Stanley $12,000 last fall, a detective told the judge.

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“He reels them in with lies and false promises,” Miami prosecutor Mary Ernst told a judge Tuesday, asking that Stanley’s bail be revoked. She added: “He never provided the comic book. He provided a series of excuses.”

His defense lawyer, Vincent Duffy, dismissed the allegations — saying there was no agreement on when the comic book was to be delivered. “It’s a personal vendetta at this point,” Duffy said of the new allegations.

Lawyer_mug

Stanley, 59, hasn’t been charged yet in the comic-book episode, so Miami-Dade Circuit Judge Eric Hendon allowed him to remain free from jail. Stanley was slated to go to trial next week, but it was delayed until at least March.

Stanley, who worked as a South Florida letter carrier for decades, also ran companies on the side called Africa World Trade and the Lena Mae Foundation. For seven years, prosecutors say, Stanley duped more than 30 investors, portraying himself as a mover and shaker in African industries, all while spending their investment money on his own mortgage payments, car rentals, groceries, entertainment and airline tickets.

“Stanley told investors that he traveled to Africa to gold and diamond mines to get the ‘best stones,’ which he then imported to the United States and sold in New York,” Florida Bureau of Financial Investigations Detective Neptime Dieujuste wrote in his arrest warrant.

Stanley introduced people to his purported jeweler, promised to double investments and flashed documents that showed he had tens of millions in African banks, prosecutors said. To at least one investor, Stanley claimed he had contracts to build a port in Cameroon and a “power grid for 50,000 in Equatorial Guinea,” the warrant said.

His charm worked.

One man, Charles Edward Floyd, was promised a 10 to 20 percent return on his investment. Within 10 days. Floyd emptied out his retirement and savings account to the tune of $250,000, according to the state. As months dragged on, the man finally confronted Stanley, who “continued to make excuses, stating, that the people he dealt with in Nigeria and Ghana needed fees to release Floyd’s investment funds.”

“To this date, Floyd has not been paid back by Stanley,” the warrant said.

Another victim, fellow postal employee Stacey Hill, forked over $56,000 to “close on a diamond deal” – and was later asked for money to pay off an African judge who was supposedly delaying his funds.

“My brother you about to get an incredible blessing … just confirm the check account information, Stacey I love you like a brother,” Stanley allegedly wrote.

Prosecutors say he even duped Lambert Baptiste, a hotel developer in the Saint Vincent and the Grenadines islands. Baptiste needed a construction loan and was convinced to invest $69,000 with Stanley — with the promise the money would be returned and a bank would also hand over the half-a-million loan. When the money vanished for months, Stanley “threatened to shoot or call the police if Baptiste ever showed up at his residence to collect his money,” the warrant said.

Another victim was Lynn Washington, a formerly well-known Miami lawyer who himself served three years in prison for stealing funds intended to help troubled inner-city neighborhoods. Prosecutors said Washington gave Stanley $250,000 for “commodities investments in Africa.”

Lynn Washington

From: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/crime/article197439059.html

Meeting Superman in Mayberry | Local News | valdostadailytimes.com

Traveling north, on Interstate 75, through Georgia, through South Carolina, pushing through North Carolina nearing the Virginia state line, is the exit for Mount Airy.

Mount Airy, N.C., was the inspiration for Mayberry in “The Andy Griffith Show.” The small town is where Griffith grew up and was the basis for Mayberry, the fictional home of Sheriff Andy Taylor, Aunt Bee, Opie, Barney Fife, Otis, Floyd, Gomer, Goober, Helen, Thelma Lou, Howard Sprague, and so many other beloved characters.

Mount Airy, in turn, has been inspired by Mayberry.

There’s an Andy Griffith Museum and a Mayberry Museum. Several businesses are named after various Mayberry characters. Reminders of the show are everywhere. 

And Raleigh, N.C., often mentioned on the show, is only about a two-hour drive from Mount Airy. Just like on TV.

Downtown buildings remain true to the turn of the previous century. There’s a main street and plenty of side roads.

On a recent fall morning, we exited the interstate and traveled along the streets of Mount Airy where we encountered a character we did not expect on the familiar lanes of “Mayberry.”

A fall Sunday morning is not prime time for an unscheduled visit to Mount Airy. The business of being Mayberry seems to have taken a break for being a small Southern town going about the business of church and breakfast.

And maybe, a few people slipping into the office for a couple hours of catching up.

Mount Airy on a Sunday morning reminds me of an episode of “The Andy Griffith Show” spin-off “Gomer Pyle U.S.M.C.” The one where Gomer returns to Mayberry and Andy, Aunt Bee, Opie, etc., are all out of town during his visit.

So, with exception of other cars cruising Mount Airy’s main drag, there’s little happening. Seeking a turnaround to take us back to the route leading to I-75, we turn down a side street.

Several yards ahead, a grey-haired man crosses the street. He’s dressed casually, giving the appearance of a professional stopping by the office for a little bit of work, or picking up a file to take home to review on a Sunday.

Except, this man also looks a great deal like the late Christopher Reeve, the actor who played Superman in the 1970s and ’80s movies. But he looks like an older, graying Reeve.

Wearing glasses, he looks like an older, graying Clark Kent, the alter ego of Superman.

He makes it across the street. He opens his office as we approach in our truck. He enters the building. The glass door closes. The truck windows are up. Several yards between the truck and building.

I say, “Look, it’s Clark Kent, hiding out in Mayberry.”

He looks up through the glass door as soon as I say this as if he has super hearing. He looks at all of us in our slow-moving truck, seems to make eye contact with each and everyone of us, and smiles a knowing smile. A smile that’s almost a wink.

Just like the winks Clark Kent used to give readers at the end of old Superman comics when Lois would say something about how Clark is never around when the action starts. And Clark would look at readers straight from the comic book page and smile a knowing smile and wink.

The Mayberry Clark Kent looks at us through the glass door and gives us the same smile. 

Shoot, he may have even given us a super-fast wink and we were just too stunned to notice as we continue driving past the building toward the route to I-75.

We didn’t see Barney Fife, but well, we discovered Superman working undercover in Mayberry.

 

Dean Poling is an editor with The Valdosta Daily Times.

From: http://www.valdostadailytimes.com/news/local_news/meeting-superman-in-mayberry/article_f18f24c5-a3ee-5cf7-ad68-2041c9a2d8e4.html

Meeting Superman in Mayberry

Traveling north, on Interstate 75, through Georgia, through South Carolina, pushing through North Carolina nearing the Virginia state line, is the exit for Mount Airy.

Mount Airy, N.C., was the inspiration for Mayberry in “The Andy Griffith Show.” The small town is where Griffith grew up and was the basis for Mayberry, the fictional home of Sheriff Andy Taylor, Aunt Bee, Opie, Barney Fife, Otis, Floyd, Gomer, Goober, Helen, Thelma Lou, Howard Sprague, and so many other beloved characters.

Mount Airy, in turn, has been inspired by Mayberry.

There’s an Andy Griffith Museum and a Mayberry Museum. Several businesses are named after various Mayberry characters. Reminders of the show are everywhere. 

And Raleigh, N.C., often mentioned on the show, is only about a two-hour drive from Mount Airy. Just like on TV.

Downtown buildings remain true to the turn of the previous century. There’s a main street and plenty of side roads.

On a recent fall morning, we exited the interstate and traveled along the streets of Mount Airy where we encountered a character we did not expect on the familiar lanes of “Mayberry.”

A fall Sunday morning is not prime time for an unscheduled visit to Mount Airy. The business of being Mayberry seems to have taken a break for being a small Southern town going about the business of church and breakfast.

And maybe, a few people slipping into the office for a couple hours of catching up.

Mount Airy on a Sunday morning reminds me of an episode of “The Andy Griffith Show” spin-off “Gomer Pyle U.S.M.C.” The one where Gomer returns to Mayberry and Andy, Aunt Bee, Opie, etc., are all out of town during his visit.

So, with exception of other cars cruising Mount Airy’s main drag, there’s little happening. Seeking a turnaround to take us back to the route leading to I-75, we turn down a side street.

Several yards ahead, a grey-haired man crosses the street. He’s dressed casually, giving the appearance of a professional stopping by the office for a little bit of work, or picking up a file to take home to review on a Sunday.

Except, this man also looks a great deal like the late Christopher Reeve, the actor who played Superman in the 1970s and ’80s movies. But he looks like an older, graying Reeve.

Wearing glasses, he looks like an older, graying Clark Kent, the alter ego of Superman.

He makes it across the street. He opens his office as we approach in our truck. He enters the building. The glass door closes. The truck windows are up. Several yards between the truck and building.

I say, “Look, it’s Clark Kent, hiding out in Mayberry.”

He looks up through the glass door as soon as I say this as if he has super hearing. He looks at all of us in our slow-moving truck, seems to make eye contact with each and everyone of us, and smiles a knowing smile. A smile that’s almost a wink.

Just like the winks Clark Kent used to give readers at the end of old Superman comics when Lois would say something about how Clark is never around when the action starts. And Clark would look at readers straight from the comic book page and smile a knowing smile and wink.

The Mayberry Clark Kent looks at us through the glass door and gives us the same smile. 

Shoot, he may have even given us a super-fast wink and we were just too stunned to notice as we continue driving past the building toward the route to I-75.

We didn’t see Barney Fife, but well, we discovered Superman working undercover in Mayberry.

 

Dean Poling is an editor with The Valdosta Daily Times.

From: http://www.valdostadailytimes.com/news/local_news/meeting-superman-in-mayberry/article_f18f24c5-a3ee-5cf7-ad68-2041c9a2d8e4.html

Superman and Booster Gold Take on the Son of General Zod

Dan Jurgens writes good Superman comics.

This isn’t really a revelation. It’s not like there was any particular issue over the last 25-odd years that made comics fandom all jump up at the same time and shout “HOLY HELL THAT WAS INCREDIBLE” (though if this were a “Dan Jurgens draws good Superman comics” conversation, I might make the case that Superman #75 qualifies there). Viewing the body of the man’s work on this character, though, it’s hard to look at all the iconic moments Jurgens has had a hand in and point to something that wasn’t at least eminently readable, and often it’s been his work that helped glue together our collective understanding of the character. 

His most recent run has been on Action Comics, where he started out examining a Lex Luthor honoring the memory of a fallen Superman, but quickly shifted to telling classic Superman fare: Clark in Metropolis, saving everyone he can; Lois being a tremendous journalist; and a collection of classic villains and concepts woven together with some great pace and a hint of melodrama.

In this exlusive preview of Action Comics #996, Superman and Booster Gold (a Jurgens creation who has been an incredible addition to the DC Universe) are stuck in a future where Zod and family have their own planet, while Lois skydives into a conflict-torn country to use her journalistic connections to save her dad. Here’s what DC has to say about the issue:

ACTION COMICS #996 Written by DAN JURGENS Art by WILL CONRAD Cover by DAN JURGENS and TREVOR SCOTT Variant cover by NEIL EDWARDS and JAY LEISTEN Retailers: This issue will ship with two covers. Please see the order form for details. “Booster Shot” part four! Superman and Booster Gold are out of time, and they’ve found themselves marooned on a strange planet sometime in the future. So why does this planet’s infrastructure look…Kryptonian? The answer shakes the Man of Steel to the core as the ruler of this planet reveals himself…the son of Zod reigns supreme!

Conrad’s art is clean and classic in the preview. Check it out!


From: http://www.denofgeek.com/us/books-comics/superman/270380/superman-and-booster-gold-take-on-the-son-of-general-zod

Did Superman Lose His Red Trunks Because of a Lawsuit? | CBR

Welcome to Comic Book Legends Revealed! This is the six hundred and sixty-third week where we examine comic book legends and whether they are true or false.

NOTE: Here is a bonus Comic Book Legends Revealed that I did for Martin Luther King Day about how a MLK comic book inspired an iconic civil rights protest!

Click here for Part 1 of this week’s legends. Click here for Part 2 of this week’s legends.

COMIC LEGEND:

DC changed Superman’s costume because of their lawsuit with the estate of Jerry Siegel.

STATUS:

I’m Going With False

DC made news recently when they revealed the cover to Action Comics #1000, which seemingly debuted a brand-new costume for Superman designed by Jim Lee that included the return of Superman’s famous red trunks, which he had worn since his first appearance all the way to 2011 and the launch of the New 52…

Here was his costume on the cover of Action Comics #1…

Here it was right before the New 52…

And here it was in the New 52, designed by Jim Lee…

With the return of the red trunks, there has been some discussion about why the change was made in the first place.

One theory was that the change had to do with DC’s lawsuit over the rights to Superman with the estate of Jerry Siegel. The courts ended up determining that an earlier settlement with the Siegels was binding and so the lawsuits ended (the same thing happened with the Joe Shuster estate. DC has entered into a settlement in 1992 that was ruled to be binding). However, in 2011, the lawsuit was still very much alive.

One of DC’s arguments in the lawsuit was that even if the court were to rule that DC did not fully own Superman as he was sold to DC back in 1938 (essentially, the material that made up Action Comics #1, including the cover), that they no longer told the adventures of THAT character. They argued that Superman is an ever-changing character and that they told the adventures of “an ever-evolving portrayal of Superman.” In other words, their version of Superman was so distinct from the character in Action Comics #1 that he was, in effect, a separate character.

Because of this position, dramatically changing his costume would go hand in hand with that idea.

However, that’s simply a case of allowing correlation to imply causation.

Noted comic book legal scholar, Jeff Trexler, wrote about this over at The Beat back in 2011, saying:

Judging by what DC has released, the changes made in the Superman relaunch would seem to reflect DC’s strategic emphasis on creative change. Costume alterations may not establish that the character is wholly new, but they do arguably provide evidence of how the company is creating stylistic elements distinct from the character’s original form. Changes in continuity are also consistent with DC’s argument, inasmuch as they underscore the company’s ongoing creative input and quite possibly take the disputed material further away from the key elements present in the co-owned Siegel content.

What Trexler was simply saying, though, was not that that is WHY DC made the costume changes, but just that the costume changes fit well with DC’s already established strategy of saying that Superman was a constantly-evolving character.

DC re-designed EVERY superhero’s costume for the New 52, in pretty much the same exact way that they re-designed Superman’s costume, so there is no evidence that they re-designed Superman’s costume specifically to make his costume different for the sake of their lawsuit. Instead, it seems like merely a statement that followed their previously established idea that, yes, Superman is always-evolving and, shockingly enough, he was evolving again. DC’s position was already based on the change from the original costume to the one that Superman was wearing in 2011 already (the one he was wearing Pre-Flashpoint) and all the changes to the character since Action Comics #1 (him being able to fly, Kryptonite, stuff like that), so since they already MADE their “Superman evolved a lot from his debut in Action Comics #1” argument well before the New 52 idea came about, it seems unlikely that they would have specifically made Superman drop his red trunks to add to their argument, at the same time that they happened to change every other hero in the same way. In other words, they didn’t really NEED it/the timing certainly suggested coincidence.

So I’m confident enough to give this one a false.


Check out my latest TV Legends Revealed – Was Carol Hathaway originally dead in the ER pilot?


OK, that’s it for this week!

Thanks to the Grand Comics Database for this week’s covers! And thanks to Brandon Hanvey for the Comic Book Legends Revealed logo!

Feel free (heck, I implore you!) to write in with your suggestions for future installments! My e-mail address is cronb01@aol.com. And my Twitter feed is http://twitter.com/brian_cronin, so you can ask me legends there, as well!

Here’s my most recent book, Why Does Batman Carry Shark Repellent? The cover is by Kevin Hopgood (the fellow who designed War Machine’s armor).

batshark

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Here’s my book of Comic Book Legends (130 legends. — half of them are re-worked classic legends I’ve featured on the blog and half of them are legends never published on the blog!).

The cover is by artist Mickey Duzyj. He did a great job on it…

If you’d like to order it, you can use the following code if you’d like to send me a bit of a referral fee…

Was Superman a Spy?: And Other Comic Book Legends Revealed

See you all next week!

From: https://www.cbr.com/superman-red-trunks-siegel-new-52-lawsuit/

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