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Rare Superman comic book sold for nearly $1 million – CNN.com

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From: http://www.cnn.com/2016/08/06/entertainment/superman-comic-book-record-sale/

Rare Superman comic book sold for nearly $1 million – CNN.com

Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what’s happening in the world as it unfolds.

From: http://www.cnn.com/2016/08/06/entertainment/superman-comic-book-record-sale/

A Rare Superman Comic Has Sold for Almost $1 Million

It was a super deal for the Man of Steel and his debut comic featuring Lois Lane.

Heritage Auctions on Thursday sold an original copy of Action Comics No. 1, which introduced the comic version of Clark Kent and Lois Lane to the world for the first time in 1938, for a whopping $956,000 at a Dallas auction, according to the company’s website.

Seventy-eight years ago, the same comic sold for 10 cents a copy, according to Heritage, which describes Superman’s first as “the most important comic book ever published.”

“Having seen many Action No. 1’s over the years, I am deeply impressed with this copy’s eye appeal,” comic grader Matt Nelson says on Heritage’s web site. “This Action No. 1 is one of the best looking among the remarkably rare pool of unrestored copies in the world.”

Superman’s original comic debut, The Reign of Superman, was printed in 1933, and actually portrayed the man in red and blue tights as a villain, according to multiple sources. Five years later, Action Comics No. 1 reintroduced the hero we all know him today.

Original copies of Action Comics No. 1 are considered extremely rare. Another copy of the same issue sold two years for $3.2 million on eBay, CNBC reports.

 

Superman is considered the world’s first mainstream, super-powered comic book hero. His appearance in Action Comics No. 1 eventually spawned an independent comic series as well as live action and animated TV shows and feature films. His latest big screen adaptation, Batman Vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice, was largely panned by critics and fans alike, but it still grossed more than $872 million to date worldwide, according to BoxOfficeMojo.com.

Heritage also auctioned Spider-Man’s first comic in February for $454,000.

From: http://fortune.com/2016/08/05/superman-comic-sold/

A Rare Superman Comic Has Sold for Almost $1 Million

It was a super deal for the Man of Steel and his debut comic featuring Lois Lane.

Heritage Auctions on Thursday sold an original copy of Action Comics No. 1, which introduced the comic version of Clark Kent and Lois Lane to the world for the first time in 1938, for a whopping $956,000 at a Dallas auction, according to the company’s website.

Seventy-eight years ago, the same comic sold for 10 cents a copy, according to Heritage, which describes Superman’s first as “the most important comic book ever published.”

“Having seen many Action No. 1’s over the years, I am deeply impressed with this copy’s eye appeal,” comic grader Matt Nelson says on Heritage’s web site. “This Action No. 1 is one of the best looking among the remarkably rare pool of unrestored copies in the world.”

Superman’s original comic debut, The Reign of Superman, was printed in 1933, and actually portrayed the man in red and blue tights as a villain, according to multiple sources. Five years later, Action Comics No. 1 reintroduced the hero we all know him today.

Original copies of Action Comics No. 1 are considered extremely rare. Another copy of the same issue sold two years for $3.2 million on eBay, CNBC reports.

 

Superman is considered the world’s first mainstream, super-powered comic book hero. His appearance in Action Comics No. 1 eventually spawned an independent comic series as well as live action and animated TV shows and feature films. His latest big screen adaptation, Batman Vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice, was largely panned by critics and fans alike, but it still grossed more than $872 million to date worldwide, according to BoxOfficeMojo.com.

Heritage also auctioned Spider-Man’s first comic in February for $454,000.

From: http://fortune.com/2016/08/05/superman-comic-sold/

Comic book containing Superman’s debut sold for nearly one million dollars

A rare copy of the first comic book featuring Superman has sold for nearly one million dollars.

A 1938 edition of Action Comics No. 1, widely considered the Holy Grail of comic books, sold Thursday for $956,000 (£730,000).

Written by Jerry Siegel and illustrated by Joe Shuster, the 13-page story opens with Superman’s crash-landing on Earth, and goes on to show him saving an innocent woman from the electric chair, stopping a man from beating his wife and going on a date with (and later rescuing) Lois Lane.

In a statement, Dallas-based Heritage Auctions said the copy, featuring Superman lifting a car on its cover and bearing a cover price of 10 cents, is one of about 100 copies of the edition known to exist.

Certified Guaranty Co, an independent company which grades the quality of comic books, graded the copy 5.5 out of a possible 10, or “fine minus.” It had been expected to sell for about $750,000.

From: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/08/05/comic-book-containing-supermans-debut-sold-for-nearly-one-millio/

From Suicide Squad to Batman v Superman, why are DC’s films so bad?

Why do DC keep on getting it so wrong with their movies? Having burned their two main tentpoles earlier this year with the unloved Batman V Superman, the comic-book behemoth was banking on the current Suicide Squad to restore its grand franchise fortunes. But now Suicide Squad has been roundly panned by the critics, leaving the grand plan for a decade-long cycle of crossover superhero movies (known as the DC Extended Universe, or DCEU) in tatters. DC’s arch-rivals Marvel continue to pull off the trick of making each new superhero movie feel like a breath of fresh air. Each new DC movie, by contrast, feels like a suffocating cloud of gloom. And each failure heaps even more expectation upon the next DC movie.

If you had to diagnose DC’s problems in two words, they would be “Zack Snyder”. Snyder is the film-maker Warner Bros entrusted with shaping the DCEU, and you have to wonder why. He rose to prominence a decade ago with Ancient Greek battle epic 300, best remembered for Gerard Butler yelling: “THIS! IS! SPARTA!” It was taken as a guiltily enjoyable exercise in camp excess, but in retrospect, Snyder wasn’t being ironic. Snyder doesn’t do irony, or humour, or subtlety. Another warning sign should have been 2011’s Sucker Punch, Snyder’s first original screenplay: a tale of female empowerment that felt closer to a glossy rape fantasy. Think nubile women in schoolgirl-stripper outfits with samurai swords leaping out of CGI fireballs in super-slow-mo. THIS! IS! SNYDER!


Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. Photograph: Clay Enos/AP

So putting him in charge of the DC “sandbox”, as Warners call it, was only ever going to end in tears and a lot of trashed sandcastles. His Superman reboot Man Of Steel buried the human element in a wearying, badly lit orgy of urban destruction (with no discernible human casualties). Batman V Superman continued to plough that gloomy, irony-free Snyderian furrow, even as it clumsily cued up the forthcoming Justice League team (remember that bit where Batman sits down and literally watches trailers for the next three DC movies?).


Not so super … Zack Snyder. Photograph: Nick Harvey/REX/Shutterstock

Snyder only executive produced Suicide Squad but it retains his trademarks of casual sexism, operatic violence, music-video montages and general teenage-boy fantasy. Reshoots were required to give the movie a life-saving humour transplant, but the negative reviews do not augur well for what’s to come. Nor does the fact that Snyder has producer roles on Wonder Woman, The Flash and Aquaman, and is directing Justice League, the two-part Avengers-style superhero movie that will supposedly pull it all together. After Snyder’s rampage in the sandbox, it will be less a matter of pulling it together than reconstructing it grain by grain.

People are starting to realise that Snyder is DC’s kryptonite. An online petition to boot him off Justice League gathered 17,000 signatures. And in May this year Warners put DC exec Geoff Johns in charge of the overall DCEU, in effect easing Snyder out of the sandbox. Going quietly does not seem to be in his nature. In fact, Snyder himself could be the perfect template for a DC supervillain: an all-powerful dictator defiling and devouring our cherished superheroes, leaving flattened cities, empty calories and crestfallen fans in his wake. Who will unite against this threat?

Suicide Squad trailer: DC’s superhero ensemble comedy starring Will Smith – video

From: https://www.theguardian.com/film/shortcuts/2016/aug/03/from-suicide-squad-to-batman-v-superman-why-dc-films-so-bad-zack-snyder

Gene Yang Said ‘No’ When DC Comics First Asked Him to Write a …



The award-winning cartoonist and writer had one answer when DC Comics brought up the idea of a Far Eastern version of Superman: “There’s no way I want to do that.”

In creations like American Born Chinese, Boxers Saints, and Level Up, Gene Luen Yang’s written and drawn very insightful comics work about Chinese culture and Asian-American identity. (He’s also taught computer coding and has a new young-adult graphic novel called Secret Coders, which serves as an intro to coding for young readers.) Despite the tendency to explore identity in his craft, Yang wasn’t sure about doing the same in a character connected to the Man of Steel’s mythos. In the interview below, conducted at Comic-Con, Yang talks about how he came around to approaching the idea of a Chinese version of Superman and how writing helps figure out his own sense of self.


io9: I read New Super-Man #1 and loved it. It seemed like you were riffing on the knock-off idea, like those bootleg action figures that are supposed to be Superman. Was that intentional?

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Gene Luen Yang: [laughs] Yeah, yeah. They’re, like, purple and they sell them in packs so it’ll be Ninja Turtles and Thor and Superman! But, yes, it is intentional. We’re going to be hitting that even harder. In two issues, we’re going to be doubling down on that.

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You’ve been writing Superman for a while now, going back to the main book. Was the creation of Kenan Kong always a goal you were working on?

Yang: No. It wasn’t my idea to create a Chinese Superman. It was actually Jim Lee’s idea. When they first pitched it to me, I was like “No, I do not want to touch that. There’s no way I want to do that.” Because Superman is like Truth, Justice, and the American Way, right? And with modern China, with the nuances of modern Chinese politics and modern Chinese culture, it felt like there was a bunch of landmines.

So what made you decide to go ahead and tap-dance through the landmines?

Yang: I flew down to Burbank and had a meeting with Jim Lee and another meeting with Geoff Johns and the character started forming in my head. He started talking to me and I felt like, “I’ve got to do this.”

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Was Kenan a jerk from the beginning?

Yang: He was a jerk from the beginning. One of the inspirations was the jerk Clark Kent. If you read early Clark Kent, that dude was a jerk. He was full of himself; he liked telling people what they were doing wrong. Eventually he progresses to what we know today. We want this New Super-Man to go through that same character arc.

Looking back on the stuff you wrote with the actual Clark Kent, what were the high points for you? Anything that you were proud that you were able to do?

Yang: I was really happy that they let me bring him to Oakland!



The wrestling stuff was great!

Yang: Oh, thank you! There’s actually a real underground wrestling ring in Oakland. And it’s so Oakland, y’know? It’s violent and brash and artistic. And putting him in a wrestling ring was my bid to try and bring back in the red underwear. I wanted to put him in a situation where I could bring back the red underwear and it would make sense but that didn’t happen.

I’m sure old-school fans will at least appreciate the intent there. Pulling back to your work as a whole, it seems like the core continuing theme is this clash between Chinese culture and the West. You explore what happens when they impact each other on a personal level and a societal level. Why do you keep on revisiting that in your work?

Yang: I think it’s such a core part of who I am. I think anybody who grows up in a minority community, you learn to code-switch. You learn to act one way with your family and you act another way [in other situations]. You learn to manage expectations from multiple angles. When you’re a kid, it’s just subconscious. You just kind of do it because that’s how you survive.

But there’s all these weird consequences of that. It impacts the way you see yourself; it impacts your self-confidence. It impacts what you think is possible in your life, y’know? I think becoming conscious of that was a huge part of me being able to find my place in the world. And I think I’m still trying to figure that out. A lot of waiting is self-therapy. I write about stuff to figure it out.



I have a kid and being a parent makes me think about that kind of thing in a different way. She’s bi-racial, and we want her to know that she comes from different histories that are rich and have their own treasures, which you won’t necessarily learn living here in this modern society. I’m glad that your work is out here in that way.

Yang: Jeff Yang talks about how culture is like water in a bucket and when you try to pass it on to your kids, you always lose a little bit of that water. And there’s a mourning that happens when those spills happen.

You have to reconfigure things to preserve what you can.

Yang: Yeah, you just gotta try to do the best you can.



Back to comics: you’re setting up a Justice League of China in New Super-Man. People are already asking if DC’s other Chinese super-team The Great Ten is going to show up. And has anybody in China reacted to New Super-Man yet?

Yang: To answer that last question first, I have had some reaction from people in mainland China. I mean, it’s Twitter so who knows? [laughs] But it seems like they’re in mainland China and it does seem like there’s a cautious optimism about this character. Which is how I feel, too. I feel cautiously optimistic. In terms of The Great Ten, they’re definitely going to have a presence in the book. They have to, right?

From: http://io9.gizmodo.com/gene-yang-said-no-when-dc-comics-first-asked-him-to-w-1784715800

Should Superman Comic-Con statue be permanent … – The San Diego Union

Love it or hate it, there is probably one image from this year’s “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice” that was impossible to forget.

A Superman statue in the fictional Metropolis used in advertisements — with the words “false god” scrawled across it in blood red spray paint — which represented a dark turn for Warner Bros. in its first crack at universe building.

The vandalism in the movie represented mankind’s fear of the Last Son of Krypton and a rejection of a statue that aimed to idolize a larger-than-life hero.

Unlike characters in the film, fans walking into Comic-Con could not get enough of a statue Warner Bros. recreated for Comic-Con and some of them suggested it stay in America’s Finest City.

“This should definitely stick around,” said Sebastian Foxworth, of Washington Township, N.J. “I can tell you, being from the East Coast, (if) they don’t want to keep it here we’ll definitely take it over in New York or (New) Jersey.”

Warner Bros. said it took roughly four weeks to recreate the statue from the film. It is made of foam and uses a gobo light to project “false god” on Superman’s chest at night. The two-story high gray statue, which weighs 700 pounds, sits on a black platform with speakers that plays music from the film.

Wearing a Wonder Woman costume and taking pictures in front of the statue, Lexi Gorospe, 16, of Sacramento, said the statue should stay to represent Comic-Con, should the event ever leave.

“Plus, San Diego kind of looks like Metropolis,” she said.

Omni Hotel general manager Colleen Anderson said the area where the statue and nearby Batmobile is parked is owned by the city, not the hotel or nearby McCormick Schmick’s Seafood Steaks.

“It’s adding a little excitement because that area is usually under-utilized,” she said.

When told of some fans’ idea to keep the Superman statue in San Diego, Anderson joked that the owners of the 38 condos in the hotel would have some questions first.

Other impressive comic book displays inside the Convention Center gave Image Comics and Marvel Comics a chance to shine.

A bronze Captain America 13-foot tall statue at the Marvel Comics booth celebrates the fictional character’s Brooklyn ties. “I’m just a kid from Brooklyn,” reads the sign. Marvel plans to move it to Children’s Corner in Prospect Park in Brooklyn in August. After that, it will move to outside the Barclays Center in September and then Industry City.

Image Comics’ very popular property and TV show, “The Walking Dead,” was the subject of a massive display inside the Convention Center with zombie actors wandering around, wax figures of TV characters and a fake prison wall (with zombies on time) that went to the ceiling.

Outside the comic book scene, “South Park” dominated much of the outside excitement at the Martin Luther King Jr. Promenade. Cutouts of the characters from popular scenes allowed fans to take photos appearing like they were in the episode.

phillip.molnar@sduniontribune.com

Mugshot of Phillip Molnar

From: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/2016/jul/21/comic-con-superman-statue/

SDCC: Superman’s Rebirth Takes Flight

SM Cv2 R1 d0f4b

What’s old is new again, as fans were re-introduced to the pre-New 52 Superman as the one true Man of Steel in the post-Rebirth DC Universe. But adding a new dimension to his never-ending battle is his Clark’s young son Jon Kent, who is now growing into his powers. Oh, and Lex Luthor is now a super man in his own right. DC Comics has brought together Gene Yang, Pat Gleason, Dan Jurgens, Tyler Kirkham, Peter Tomasi, and moderator Hank Kanalz at Comic-Con International in San Diego to discuss the goings-on around Metropolis and what’s coming next.

The panel kicked off by Gene Yang talking about “New Super-Man.” Jim Lee and Dan DiDio came up with the concept, “and when they brought it to me I said, hell no, I don’t want to do that,” Yang said, noting he did not have first-hand experience of living in China. But the character “started speaking to me” and he accepted the gig.

The book was originally called “The Super-Man,” but Yang noted that the Chinese language does not have “the.”

Kenan Kong’s name comes from Chinese words for “overcome” and “south,” Yang said. “Even though Shanghai is not in southern China, people in Beijing refer to folks who live in Shanghai as ‘southerners.'”

Dr. Omen is “a Chinese version of Amanda Waller,” who works for the Ministry of Self Reliance that gives Kenan his powers, Yang said.

“Superman is supposed to be about Truth, Justice, and the American Way — what does that mean in China?” Yang said. “That’s a cultural landmine.” But Yang will be searching for ways to have Kenan experience an arc, like Clark Kent or the monkey king epic (which inspired “Dragon Ball Z”), to embody Chinese-ness in the way Superman does for America.

Yang compared the Chinese versions of American superheroes to the country’s “state approved religions” in real life — “they found they couldn’t suppress religion, so they made state-sponsored versions.” For superheroes, “they were really into American superheroes, and since they couldn’t suppress them, they created state-approved versions.”

“New Super-Man” #4 will see Kenan fighting an analog to the Freedom Fighters, “a pro-democracy group of supervillains — yeah, we just went for it.”

Since Yang will have to leave the panel early, Kanalz took fan questions for him briefly. A woman said she enjoyed the first issue of “New Super-Man,” but “my only criticism is the size of the dumplings, they were a little too big.”

Asked about the Great Ten characters, Yang said, “August gGeneral in Iron shows up in #3.”

As Yang departed the stage, attention turned to Kirkham and Jurgens’ “Action Comics.” Kirkham noted that, though his design for Doomsday is based on Jurgens’ original, the character evolves, leading to a changing visual presence.

Jurgens compared the dual artists/double shipping situation to movies not being shot in order. “That means that, yes, sometimes you have to go back and make corrections” if certain elements don’t line up, as Kirkham confessed he had to do for the plaid on Clark Kent’s shirt.

Doomsday’s ability to hone in on Kryptonians will cause trouble for Super-family. “He’s located another Kryptonian on Earth,” Jurgens said, “and that is actually Jon.” The fight comes to the farm, placing Superman’s wife and son in danger.

Tomasi said he looked to “what everybody loves about Superman” to write the eponymous ongoing.

“Having Jon in the story is a great way to view Superman,” Gleason said. “It’s a way to have Superman come back and appear trustworthy.”

“We both really love writing the character based stuff,” Tomasi said of himself and Jurgens, who set up the family dynamic in the “Lois and Clark” miniseries that preceded “Rebirth.”

“One of the great things about having a book coming out twice a month, you can explore corners you might not be able to in a monthly book,” Jurgens said, as having “forty pages a month to play with” allows for more detours.

A fan asked what the Time Masters have been up to since “Convergence.” “It’s on my list of things to get to,” he said. “The good thing about two books a month is you can get through a lot of material really quick.”

Using Doomsday in Superman’s new circumstances “allows us to say new things” about who Superman is today, Jurgens said, since everyone knows the original story.

“There’s a lot of cool stuff coming up for Lois,” Tomasi said, particularly something in “Superman” #5.

“Without ‘Action Comics’ #1. we wouldn’t have the industry we have industry today,” Jurgens said, “and we know that because that’s where Superman debuted. But that’s also where Lois debuted, and I take that very seriously.” Both “Action” and “Superman” will examine what it means for a character in her unique situation to be a mother.

Kirkham noted that, as Jon watches Superman fight Doomsday on TV, “Lois knows how this could end.”

Tomasi said there are no plans at present to have Jon join the Teen Titans.

A fan’s perceptive questioning led the panelists to reveal that “Superwoman” #1 addresses the fates of the multiple Lois Lanes as well as Lana Lang.

Asked about Lex’s future as a hero or villain, Jurgens noted there’s a wealth of material to work with. “What’s fun about Lex is he is so complex, and I think there are many more angles to be explored,” Jurgens said. “He wants to do the right thing, but when the chips are down, will he follow through. We also know he’s a murderer, and I really feel you can’t atone for that until you stand up and say, I am a murderer.”

Asked about the complications inherent in the old-new Superman from a new reader standpoint. “You just have to let go sometimes and go along with it as a reader, get immersed in the story and trust the creators,” Tomasi said. “You can’t let it feed your reading all the time. … I’ve never been one to get too bogged down in continuity, I just let the current creative teams tell their story.”

On the topic of the restored Lois and Clark marriage, Jurgens noted that Lois and Superman had been connected since “Action” #1, but with the New 52, “not only were they not married, but they didn’t even have that connection.” When he wrote several issues early in the New 52 run, Jurgens said “I felt that absence, I think we all felt it.”

Will the Legion be showing up? Tomasi: “No comment.” Kanalz added that there have been hints in recent issues.

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TAGS:  sdcc2016, superman, action comics, superman: rebirth, dan jurgens, patrick gleason, peter tomasi, tyler kirkham

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From: http://www.comicbookresources.com/article/sdcc-supermans-rebirth-takes-flight

Major Superman Supporting Character Dies In New Superman Comic

(Photo: DC Entertainment)

Spoilers ahead for Superman #3 from DC Comics, on sale now.

Today’s issue of Superman saw the apparent death of a beloved member of Superman’s supporting cast at the hands of The Eradicator.

Teased for the last two issues, The Eradicator appears in full in this week’s Superman, wearing a close approximation of the costume and visor he wore when he was “The Last Son of Krypton” during 1993’s Reign of the Supermen! storyline.

While the original Eradicator was a small weapon which took on a humanoid form after Superman threw it into the sun, the post-Flashpoint version of The Eradicator is a member of a hive-mind of robot soldiers created on Krypton by General Zod, and given a single, humanoid form moments before Krypton’s destruction.

As in the past, The Eradicator hopes to preserve Kryptonian life — but misses the forest for the trees a bit and ends up at odds with Superman.

This time, when it takes aim at Superman’s son Jonathan, the Ai is confronted with Krypto, the post-Flashpoint Superman’s Kryptonian dog, who had been waiting at the Fortress of Solitude when Superman and Lois brought an injured Jon at the beginning of the issue. It was in the Fortress that they ran into The Eradicator.

The Eradicator responds by dislocating its jaw and sucking Krypto entirely into the resultant black hole of a mouth, leaving nothing but a cape.

Ew.

This scene is likely to be somewhat controversial, especially when you consider that just two issues ago, writer Pete Tomasi and artist Patrick Gleason killed off Jon’s cat, a creature they introduced during “The Final Days of Superman” just weeks before.

There’s some hope for Krypto, though: In the course of revealing his backstory to Superman, The Eradicator describes the process by which they would enforce Zod’s law: they would suck out criminals’ “life force,” sending it to the Phantom Zone, and put the bodies themselves in cryo-stasis.

How, exactly, that would work with Krypto, who was swallowed whole, isn’t entirely clear, but it definitely seems like if The Eradicator has got a ticket to the Phantom Zone inside its mouth, Krypto might not be as “dead” as advertised.

Of course, The Eradicator might not get a chance to explain himself, since both Superman and Jon flew into a blind rage, and the Man of Steel started pummelling The Eradicator…!

From: http://comicbook.com/dc/2016/07/20/major-superman-supporting-character-dies-in-new-superman-comic/

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