About admin


Website:
admin has written 2761 articles so far, you can find them below.


Meanwhile, Kavanaugh pal Mark Judge hides out in Delaware beach house with his Superman comics

What does a man with nothing to hide do? He runs off to a beach house in Delaware, and finds refuge amid piles of rumpled clothes and boxes of vintage Superman comics.

Mark Judge has fled Washington DC to a windswept beach home, far away from Dr. Christine Blasey Ford’s memory or Michael Avenatti’s new gang rape claims.

Judge previously told the Senate committee he has no memory of the sexual assault incident alleged by Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, and said last week while that story broke that he does not want to speak publicly.

An amazingly written and reported story about a guy we’re gonna be hearing much more from soon. From Gabriel Pogrund, Caroll Leonnig, Aaron C. Davis, and Seung Min Kim at the Washington Post.

Excerpt:

A Washington Post reporter found Judge holed up Monday in a house in Bethany Beach, Del. “How’d you find me,” he asked. He declined to comment further.

Barbara “Biz” Van Gelder, Judge’s attorney, said her client left town at her instruction because of an onslaught of criticism and press questions.

“I told him to leave town. He is being hounded. He is a recovering alcoholic and is under unbelievable stress,” she said. “He needed for his own health to get out of this toxic environment and take care of himself.”

Van Gelder said Judge waited to leave town until after the hearing date and witnesses were announced, and was not avoiding a subpoena.

George Hartmann, a spokesman for the Judiciary Committee, said Monday it had resolved all issues for Ford’s testimony Thursday, including the Republicans’ insistence that female staff attorneys be allowed to question Kavanaugh and Ford at the hearing.

But a letter sent later Monday by Ford’s legal team indicated that not all the sticking points appear to have been settled. Her attorney complained about McConnell’s blistering afternoon speech, calling it “inconsistent” with the approach that Grassley and his staff have tried to take. The lawyer also pushed back on the apparent hire of an “experienced sex crimes prosecutor” — as a top Grassley staffer appeared to mention in an earlier email — to question Kavanaugh and Ford on behalf of Republicans.

“This is not a criminal trial for which the involvement of an experienced sex crimes prosecutor would be appropriate,” lawyer Michael Bromwich wrote. “Neither Dr. Blasey Ford nor Judge Kavanaugh is on trial.”

<!–

xeni jardin

Boing Boing editor/partner and tech culture journalist Xeni Jardin hosts and produces Boing Boing’s in-flight TV channel on Virgin America airlines (#10 on the dial), and writes about living with breast cancer. Diagnosed in 2011. @xeni on Twitter. email: xeni@boingboing.net.

–>

From: https://boingboing.net/2018/09/24/meanwhile-kavanaugh-pal-mark.html

Kevin Smith Thinks Not Making More Superman Movies Is a Mistake

Earlier in September, DC Comics fans were stunned by reports that Henry Cavill had exited his role as Superman in the DC Extended Universe. The news was coupled with reports that Warner Bros. has no plans to make Superman movies for several years at least. Kevin Smith thinks that’s a mistake.

Smith addressed Cavill’s reported exit and Warner Bros.’ plans, or lack thereof, for Superman on the first episode of his podcast Fatman Beyond (formerly known as Fatman on Batman).

“That’s a mistake,” Smith said. “I think you need to keep your big guy vital. This is the very first superhero ever created, the ‘king of the superheroes’ if you will, the one that paved the way for everybody else. While we’re in this amazing era, this renaissance of comic book movies, don’t leave your best guy on the bench.”

Smith went on to suggest that Warner Bros. may be making Superman a more complicated puzzle to solve than he ought to be, comparing his ponderous, heavily metaphorical character arc in Zack Snyder’s films to the simplicity of Richard Donner’s take.

“Just f**king hand it to somebody who’s going to make it what everybody knows that character to be,” Smith suggested. “The character’s a symbol of hope, man. Like, go back and watch 10 minutes of the Christopher Reeve Superman and use that as the DNA for what they do going forward. It’s not about some Christ parable, or he’s this f**king alien from another world, he’s just a good f**king dude. It’s that simple. You can make a movie about a good f**king dude.

“The Christopher Reeve and Dick Donner version of Superman is just so beautiful and so simple, and that character is beautiful and simple, but not simple like he’s stupid, simple in that it can appeal to anybody, you know what I’m saying?”

Cavill discussed the issue in more detail, with further comparisons between Snyder’s vision of Superman and Donner’s version. He also said that it’s fine for Warner Bros. to go forward with a Supergirl movie, or to cast Michael B. Jordan as the new Superman, but that there should always be a Superman movie in development just like there’s always a Batman movie in development.

5comments

“If it’s not Henry Cavill, there are a lot of other people that can wear that cape,” Smith said.

What do you think of Kevin Smith’s take on the Superman movie situation? Let us know in the comments!

From: https://comicbook.com/dc/2018/09/23/kevin-smith-mistake-not-making-superman-movies/

Digital Comics Sale: Sorting Through DC’s “Essential Graphic Novels” Sale – Superman, Batman and… Donald Trump …

DC is having their “Essential Graphic Novels” sale and it’s always interesting to see what’s considered essential.  There will always be a little disagreement on that (for instance, I’ll take Jeff Smith’s Shazam over Geoff Johns every day of the week and twice on Sunday), but let’s go through and look at what’s good and maybe one or two things that are unexpected.

Let us not forget DC still has the rights to The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen and the first volume is on sale.

Superman: Red Son by Mark Millar, Dave Johnson and Killian Plunkett absolutely is an entertaining read and nice to see DC and Millar on good enough terms to see it highlighted again.  It wasn’t for awhile.

I’m not sure I’d call Batman: Black Mirror *essential*, but it’s a solid book by Scott Snyder, Jock and Francesco Francavilla from that period where Dick Grayson was filling in as Batman.

Have you read Tom King’s Omega Men yet? It’s the real deal.  Very dark and something you wanted to read as a tpb, not a monthly serial.

I will admit, I was surprised to see MAD About Trump: A Brilliant Look at Our Brainless President on the Essential list.  I was also surprised Jake Tapper did the intro.  Mad Magazine still revels in agitation.

Batwoman by Greg Rucka and J.H. Williams is another title I wasn’t expecting to see on the Essential list, but it really deserves to be.

I really can’t say enough about the Russell/Pugh re-imagining of The Flintstones as a pitch black social satire.  Wonderful, wonderful work.

Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow is really “Superman by Alan Moore.”  Ignore the solicitation copy.  This has very little in common with The Killing Joke.  You’ve got the homage/wrap up to the Silver Age Superman as the things wrapped up prior to John Byrne’s reboot.  That title story is drawn by Curt Swan.  You’ve got the more famous “For the Man Who Has Everything” story drawn by Dave Gibbons.  And finally a DC Comics Presents team-up with Swamp Thing drawn by Rick Veitch.  Nice little package if you haven’t read these selections.

And there are 90+ more books that are probably a little more what you were expecting from an “Essential” sale, so go ahead and browse on your own.

Todd Allen wears a lot of hats. At various times he’s been (alphabetically), a bouncer, college professor, humor columnist, Internet producer and an NBA/WNBA Beat Writer, among other things. He’s the author of Economics of Digital Comics. You should probably read it.

From: http://www.comicsbeat.com/digital-comics-sale-sorting-through-dcs-essential-graphic-novels-sale-superman-batman-and-donald-trump/

DC Superheroes Have Their Own Streaming Service Now

As the battle for spandex supremacy rages on, the latest gambit comes from DC Entertainment: a subscription streaming service dedicated exclusively to DC content. (Marvel, for now, can rely on a little upstart called Netflix to host much of its original content.) DC Universe debuted last weekend, and thus far its selection of contemporary blockbusters is relatively humble. But the service runs deep with more obscure and retro offerings, with several original scripted series on the way.

At present, the DC Universe library ranges from popular films like “The Dark Knight” and “Superman: The Movie” to lesser-known artifacts like the “Flash” TV series from the early ’90s and the 1987 made-for-TV adaptation of “The Spirit.” The service also offers direct-to-video animated films, including this year’s “The Death of Superman,” but newer live-action hits like “Wonder Woman” — as well as shows from the CW’s “Arrowverse” — are still nowhere to be found.

The service’s first original scripted series, “Titans,” debuts Oct. 12, based on the “Teen Titans” comics. (The trailer suggests a darker, more violent take on the comics, similar to Marvel Netflix series like “Daredevil” and “The Punisher.”) Others will include “Doom Patrol,” “Harley Quinn” and “Swamp Thing,” all scheduled for 2019. Some features, however, set DC Universe apart from competing platforms — notably, a limited selection of digital comics, which subscribers can download to their streaming devices. There’s also a community message board, a character encyclopedia and, of course, a merchandise shop.

Subscriptions start at $7.99 a month, or $74.99 for a year. Not sure whether it’s worth the cost? Here’s a closer look at some of its best current offerings.

Max Fleischer’s ‘Superman’ Cartoons (1941-1943)

Superman made his comics debut in 1938, and he first appeared on the big screen three years later in these animated shorts, most of which were produced by Max Fleischer (a handful at the end of its run were produced by Famous Studios). In these films, Superman and his girlfriend, Lois Lane, encounter a variety of villains like mad scientists, flying robots and mummies, as well as more real-world threats like Nazis. The shorts are very much a product of their time (as with other animated shorts produced during World War II, there are a few cringe-inducing moments of Japanese stereotyping), but the animation still holds up very well. The shorts are notable for their use of rotoscoping, an animation technique that allows animators to trace over live-action footage in order to produce more realistic action. The design also served as a big influence on later DC animation, including “Batman: The Animated Series” and “Superman: The Animated Series.”

‘Super Friends’ (1973-1986)

For a much goofier take on the DC superheroes, check out the animated “Super Friends” (known as “The Super Powers Team: Galactic Guardians” in its final season). Produced by Hanna-Barbera and originally aired as a Saturday morning cartoon, “Super Friends” features established characters like Batman, Wonder Woman and Superman, who team with then-original characters like the purple-suited Wonder Twins and their pet monkey, Gleek. The show follows the Justice League of America as it confronts classic DC villains like Lex Luthor, Brainiac and Giganta, as well as fight the occasional skirmish against Dracula or the Incredible Crude Oil Monster. We also have the show to thank for that wonderful GIF of Aquaman riding two dolphins as if they were skis. The show has a reputation for being a joke (and it kind of is), but there’s something refreshing about seeing the DC characters let loose and be wacky, especially when considering how dark DC has gone lately.

‘Wonder Woman’ (1975-1978)

Long before Gal Gadot strapped on her bullet-deflecting bracelets, Lynda Carter was beating up German soldiers as the crime-fighting Amazon princess Diana Prince, better known as Wonder Woman. In keeping with her comic book origins, Diana is living on Paradise Island with her fellow Amazons when a pilot named Steve Trevor (Lyle Waggoner) crashes his plane and lands on the island. Steve recruits Diana, and she leaves the island to go fight Nazis. The show flashed forward in time to the 1970s for later seasons, which allowed Carter to wear some truly fantastic costumes. But although the series is campy (Diana basically fights crime in a bathing suit, and the invisible jet is never not hilarious), this earlier Wonder Woman is still a female superhero who doesn’t bow to any man. Look out for Cloris Leachman as Diana’s mother and Debra Winger in an early role as Diana’s sister, Drusilla.

‘Superman: The Movie’ (1978)

Christopher Reeve wasn’t the first live-action Superman, but for many fans, he still defines the role. He manages to capture the awkwardness of Clark Kent while still seeming confident and heroic as Superman, making you almost believe that no one would guess they’re the same person. “Superman: The Movie” retells Superman’s origin story, and while it’s familiar, the sincerity and humor of the film make it a joy. Margot Kidder is excellent as Lois Lane, making the character more than just a girlfriend, and Gene Hackman does great work as Lex Luthor. Add the score by John Williams and Marlon Brando’s appearance as Superman’s dad, and you have a classic comic book adaptation. Reeve starred in three sequels, all of which are available on DC Universe, although “Superman II” (1980) is the only one worth checking out.

Batman Returns (1992)

“Batman Returns” offers a dark, melancholy take on Batman that has grown only more relevant with time. Michael Keaton returns in this sequel to the 1989 “Batman,” and this time he is joined by Christopher Walken, who plays a corrupt businessman named Max Shreck — who, in turn, is trying to get a grotesque monster, Oswald Cobblepot, better known as the Penguin (Danny DeVito), elected as the mayor of Gotham City. Michelle Pfeiffer appears as Selina Kyle, who fashions herself into the crafty and seductive Catwoman in order to seek revenge on Shreck after he tries to murder her. “Batman Returns” portrays Batman and Catwoman as two damaged, lonely people who are drawn together by trauma, and even the Penguin gets a tragic back story that makes him more pitiable than loathsome. It’s Pfeiffer who makes the biggest impression, though; her character gets the best lines, and her transformation from a meek secretary into a wild cat is thrilling.

Batman: The Animated Series (1992-1995)

Available in high definition for the first time, “Batman: The Animated Series” is not only the best Batman TV series, it is also one of the best animated series of all time. The show takes a sharply different approach than that of Batman’s previous TV incarnations, offering a noir-inspired aesthetic that takes the character seriously while still being suitable for kids. Classic Batman villains like Mr. Freeze, Poison Ivy, Catwoman and the Joker (voiced by Mark Hamill) are given depth and substance. Elements of the series were so popular that they were later added into the comic books, including the character of Harley Quinn, who has since become one of DC’s most popular characters (and the future recipient of her own animated series). This show is the reason an entire generation fell in love with Batman.

The Dark Knight (2008)

It’s hard to understate what a huge cultural event “The Dark Knight” was upon its release. The death of Heath Ledger at age 28 certainly played a role, but the film itself broke new ground for complex superhero storytelling onscreen. A sequel to “Batman Begins” (2005), this film from Christopher Nolan finds Batman (Christian Bale) struggling against the Joker (Ledger), a psychotic criminal who just wants to see the world burn. District Attorney Harvey Dent (Aaron Eckhart) tries to handle the Joker in his own way, and both he and Batman suffer losses as they are tested by the Joker’s twisted plans. The film asks how good can succeed in the face of such evil, and what lengths we will pursue in order to achieve justice. Much of the film’s effectiveness is owed to Ledger, who posthumously received an Oscar for his performance. But credit also belongs to the thrilling action sequences, twisty plot and propulsive score by Hans Zimmer.

From: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/21/watching/dc-universe-comics-stream-batman-superman.html

DC Superheroes Have Their Own Streaming Service Now

As the battle for spandex supremacy rages on, the latest gambit comes from DC Entertainment: a subscription streaming service dedicated exclusively to DC content. (Marvel, for now, can rely on a little upstart called Netflix to host much of its original content.) DC Universe debuted last weekend, and thus far its selection of contemporary blockbusters is relatively humble. But the service runs deep with more obscure and retro offerings, with several original scripted series on the way.

At present, the DC Universe library ranges from popular films like “The Dark Knight” and “Superman: The Movie” to lesser-known artifacts like the “Flash” TV series from the early ’90s and the 1987 made-for-TV adaptation of “The Spirit.” The service also offers direct-to-video animated films, including this year’s “The Death of Superman,” but newer live-action hits like “Wonder Woman” — as well as shows from the CW’s “Arrowverse” — are still nowhere to be found.

The service’s first original scripted series, “Titans,” debuts Oct. 12, based on the “Teen Titans” comics. (The trailer suggests a darker, more violent take on the comics, similar to Marvel Netflix series like “Daredevil” and “The Punisher.”) Others will include “Doom Patrol,” “Harley Quinn” and “Swamp Thing,” all scheduled for 2019. Some features, however, set DC Universe apart from competing platforms — notably, a limited selection of digital comics, which subscribers can download to their streaming devices. There’s also a community message board, a character encyclopedia and, of course, a merchandise shop.

Subscriptions start at $7.99 a month, or $74.99 for a year. Not sure whether it’s worth the cost? Here’s a closer look at some of its best current offerings.

Max Fleischer’s ‘Superman’ Cartoons (1941-1943)

Superman made his comics debut in 1938, and he first appeared on the big screen three years later in these animated shorts, most of which were produced by Max Fleischer (a handful at the end of its run were produced by Famous Studios). In these films, Superman and his girlfriend, Lois Lane, encounter a variety of villains like mad scientists, flying robots and mummies, as well as more real-world threats like Nazis. The shorts are very much a product of their time (as with other animated shorts produced during World War II, there are a few cringe-inducing moments of Japanese stereotyping), but the animation still holds up very well. The shorts are notable for their use of rotoscoping, an animation technique that allows animators to trace over live-action footage in order to produce more realistic action. The design also served as a big influence on later DC animation, including “Batman: The Animated Series” and “Superman: The Animated Series.”

‘Super Friends’ (1973-1986)

For a much goofier take on the DC superheroes, check out the animated “Super Friends” (known as “The Super Powers Team: Galactic Guardians” in its final season). Produced by Hanna-Barbera and originally aired as a Saturday morning cartoon, “Super Friends” features established characters like Batman, Wonder Woman and Superman, who team with then-original characters like the purple-suited Wonder Twins and their pet monkey, Gleek. The show follows the Justice League of America as it confronts classic DC villains like Lex Luthor, Brainiac and Giganta, as well as fight the occasional skirmish against Dracula or the Incredible Crude Oil Monster. We also have the show to thank for that wonderful GIF of Aquaman riding two dolphins as if they were skis. The show has a reputation for being a joke (and it kind of is), but there’s something refreshing about seeing the DC characters let loose and be wacky, especially when considering how dark DC has gone lately.

‘Wonder Woman’ (1975-1978)

Long before Gal Gadot strapped on her bullet-deflecting bracelets, Lynda Carter was beating up German soldiers as the crime-fighting Amazon princess Diana Prince, better known as Wonder Woman. In keeping with her comic book origins, Diana is living on Paradise Island with her fellow Amazons when a pilot named Steve Trevor (Lyle Waggoner) crashes his plane and lands on the island. Steve recruits Diana, and she leaves the island to go fight Nazis. The show flashed forward in time to the 1970s for later seasons, which allowed Carter to wear some truly fantastic costumes. But although the series is campy (Diana basically fights crime in a bathing suit, and the invisible jet is never not hilarious), this earlier Wonder Woman is still a female superhero who doesn’t bow to any man. Look out for Cloris Leachman as Diana’s mother and Debra Winger in an early role as Diana’s sister, Drusilla.

‘Superman: The Movie’ (1978)

Christopher Reeve wasn’t the first live-action Superman, but for many fans, he still defines the role. He manages to capture the awkwardness of Clark Kent while still seeming confident and heroic as Superman, making you almost believe that no one would guess they’re the same person. “Superman: The Movie” retells Superman’s origin story, and while it’s familiar, the sincerity and humor of the film make it a joy. Margot Kidder is excellent as Lois Lane, making the character more than just a girlfriend, and Gene Hackman does great work as Lex Luthor. Add the score by John Williams and Marlon Brando’s appearance as Superman’s dad, and you have a classic comic book adaptation. Reeve starred in three sequels, all of which are available on DC Universe, although “Superman II” (1980) is the only one worth checking out.

Batman Returns (1992)

“Batman Returns” offers a dark, melancholy take on Batman that has grown only more relevant with time. Michael Keaton returns in this sequel to the 1989 “Batman,” and this time he is joined by Christopher Walken, who plays a corrupt businessman named Max Shreck — who, in turn, is trying to get a grotesque monster, Oswald Cobblepot, better known as the Penguin (Danny DeVito), elected as the mayor of Gotham City. Michelle Pfeiffer appears as Selina Kyle, who fashions herself into the crafty and seductive Catwoman in order to seek revenge on Shreck after he tries to murder her. “Batman Returns” portrays Batman and Catwoman as two damaged, lonely people who are drawn together by trauma, and even the Penguin gets a tragic back story that makes him more pitiable than loathsome. It’s Pfeiffer who makes the biggest impression, though; her character gets the best lines, and her transformation from a meek secretary into a wild cat is thrilling.

Batman: The Animated Series (1992-1995)

Available in high definition for the first time, “Batman: The Animated Series” is not only the best Batman TV series, it is also one of the best animated series of all time. The show takes a sharply different approach than that of Batman’s previous TV incarnations, offering a noir-inspired aesthetic that takes the character seriously while still being suitable for kids. Classic Batman villains like Mr. Freeze, Poison Ivy, Catwoman and the Joker (voiced by Mark Hamill) are given depth and substance. Elements of the series were so popular that they were later added into the comic books, including the character of Harley Quinn, who has since become one of DC’s most popular characters (and the future recipient of her own animated series). This show is the reason an entire generation fell in love with Batman.

The Dark Knight (2008)

It’s hard to understate what a huge cultural event “The Dark Knight” was upon its release. The death of Heath Ledger at age 28 certainly played a role, but the film itself broke new ground for complex superhero storytelling onscreen. A sequel to “Batman Begins” (2005), this film from Christopher Nolan finds Batman (Christian Bale) struggling against the Joker (Ledger), a psychotic criminal who just wants to see the world burn. District Attorney Harvey Dent (Aaron Eckhart) tries to handle the Joker in his own way, and both he and Batman suffer losses as they are tested by the Joker’s twisted plans. The film asks how good can succeed in the face of such evil, and what lengths we will pursue in order to achieve justice. Much of the film’s effectiveness is owed to Ledger, who posthumously received an Oscar for his performance. But credit also belongs to the thrilling action sequences, twisty plot and propulsive score by Hans Zimmer.

From: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/21/watching/dc-universe-comics-stream-batman-superman.html

DC Superheroes Have Their Own Streaming Service Now

As the battle for spandex supremacy rages on, the latest gambit comes from DC Entertainment: a subscription streaming service dedicated exclusively to DC content. (Marvel, for now, can rely on a little upstart called Netflix to host much of its original content.) DC Universe debuted last weekend, and thus far its selection of contemporary blockbusters is relatively humble. But the service runs deep with more obscure and retro offerings, with several original scripted series on the way.

At present, the DC Universe library ranges from popular films like “The Dark Knight” and “Superman: The Movie” to lesser-known artifacts like the “Flash” TV series from the early ’90s and the 1987 made-for-TV adaptation of “The Spirit.” The service also offers direct-to-video animated films, including this year’s “The Death of Superman,” but newer live-action hits like “Wonder Woman” — as well as shows from the CW’s “Arrowverse” — are still nowhere to be found.

The service’s first original scripted series, “Titans,” debuts Oct. 12, based on the “Teen Titans” comics. (The trailer suggests a darker, more violent take on the comics, similar to Marvel Netflix series like “Daredevil” and “The Punisher.”) Others will include “Doom Patrol,” “Harley Quinn” and “Swamp Thing,” all scheduled for 2019. Some features, however, set DC Universe apart from competing platforms — notably, a limited selection of digital comics, which subscribers can download to their streaming devices. There’s also a community message board, a character encyclopedia and, of course, a merchandise shop.

Subscriptions start at $7.99 a month, or $74.99 for a year. Not sure whether it’s worth the cost? Here’s a closer look at some of its best current offerings.

Max Fleischer’s ‘Superman’ Cartoons (1941-1943)

Superman made his comics debut in 1938, and he first appeared on the big screen three years later in these animated shorts, most of which were produced by Max Fleischer (a handful at the end of its run were produced by Famous Studios). In these films, Superman and his girlfriend, Lois Lane, encounter a variety of villains like mad scientists, flying robots and mummies, as well as more real-world threats like Nazis. The shorts are very much a product of their time (as with other animated shorts produced during World War II, there are a few cringe-inducing moments of Japanese stereotyping), but the animation still holds up very well. The shorts are notable for their use of rotoscoping, an animation technique that allows animators to trace over live-action footage in order to produce more realistic action. The design also served as a big influence on later DC animation, including “Batman: The Animated Series” and “Superman: The Animated Series.”

‘Super Friends’ (1973-1986)

For a much goofier take on the DC superheroes, check out the animated “Super Friends” (known as “The Super Powers Team: Galactic Guardians” in its final season). Produced by Hanna-Barbera and originally aired as a Saturday morning cartoon, “Super Friends” features established characters like Batman, Wonder Woman and Superman, who team with then-original characters like the purple-suited Wonder Twins and their pet monkey, Gleek. The show follows the Justice League of America as it confronts classic DC villains like Lex Luthor, Brainiac and Giganta, as well as fight the occasional skirmish against Dracula or the Incredible Crude Oil Monster. We also have the show to thank for that wonderful GIF of Aquaman riding two dolphins as if they were skis. The show has a reputation for being a joke (and it kind of is), but there’s something refreshing about seeing the DC characters let loose and be wacky, especially when considering how dark DC has gone lately.

‘Wonder Woman’ (1975-1978)

Long before Gal Gadot strapped on her bullet-deflecting bracelets, Lynda Carter was beating up German soldiers as the crime-fighting Amazon princess Diana Prince, better known as Wonder Woman. In keeping with her comic book origins, Diana is living on Paradise Island with her fellow Amazons when a pilot named Steve Trevor (Lyle Waggoner) crashes his plane and lands on the island. Steve recruits Diana, and she leaves the island to go fight Nazis. The show flashed forward in time to the 1970s for later seasons, which allowed Carter to wear some truly fantastic costumes. But although the series is campy (Diana basically fights crime in a bathing suit, and the invisible jet is never not hilarious), this earlier Wonder Woman is still a female superhero who doesn’t bow to any man. Look out for Cloris Leachman as Diana’s mother and Debra Winger in an early role as Diana’s sister, Drusilla.

‘Superman: The Movie’ (1978)

Christopher Reeve wasn’t the first live-action Superman, but for many fans, he still defines the role. He manages to capture the awkwardness of Clark Kent while still seeming confident and heroic as Superman, making you almost believe that no one would guess they’re the same person. “Superman: The Movie” retells Superman’s origin story, and while it’s familiar, the sincerity and humor of the film make it a joy. Margot Kidder is excellent as Lois Lane, making the character more than just a girlfriend, and Gene Hackman does great work as Lex Luthor. Add the score by John Williams and Marlon Brando’s appearance as Superman’s dad, and you have a classic comic book adaptation. Reeve starred in three sequels, all of which are available on DC Universe, although “Superman II” (1980) is the only one worth checking out.

Batman Returns (1992)

“Batman Returns” offers a dark, melancholy take on Batman that has grown only more relevant with time. Michael Keaton returns in this sequel to the 1989 “Batman,” and this time he is joined by Christopher Walken, who plays a corrupt businessman named Max Shreck — who, in turn, is trying to get a grotesque monster, Oswald Cobblepot, better known as the Penguin (Danny DeVito), elected as the mayor of Gotham City. Michelle Pfeiffer appears as Selina Kyle, who fashions herself into the crafty and seductive Catwoman in order to seek revenge on Shreck after he tries to murder her. “Batman Returns” portrays Batman and Catwoman as two damaged, lonely people who are drawn together by trauma, and even the Penguin gets a tragic back story that makes him more pitiable than loathsome. It’s Pfeiffer who makes the biggest impression, though; her character gets the best lines, and her transformation from a meek secretary into a wild cat is thrilling.

Batman: The Animated Series (1992-1995)

Available in high definition for the first time, “Batman: The Animated Series” is not only the best Batman TV series, it is also one of the best animated series of all time. The show takes a sharply different approach than that of Batman’s previous TV incarnations, offering a noir-inspired aesthetic that takes the character seriously while still being suitable for kids. Classic Batman villains like Mr. Freeze, Poison Ivy, Catwoman and the Joker (voiced by Mark Hamill) are given depth and substance. Elements of the series were so popular that they were later added into the comic books, including the character of Harley Quinn, who has since become one of DC’s most popular characters (and the future recipient of her own animated series). This show is the reason an entire generation fell in love with Batman.

The Dark Knight (2008)

It’s hard to understate what a huge cultural event “The Dark Knight” was upon its release. The death of Heath Ledger at age 28 certainly played a role, but the film itself broke new ground for complex superhero storytelling onscreen. A sequel to “Batman Begins” (2005), this film from Christopher Nolan finds Batman (Christian Bale) struggling against the Joker (Ledger), a psychotic criminal who just wants to see the world burn. District Attorney Harvey Dent (Aaron Eckhart) tries to handle the Joker in his own way, and both he and Batman suffer losses as they are tested by the Joker’s twisted plans. The film asks how good can succeed in the face of such evil, and what lengths we will pursue in order to achieve justice. Much of the film’s effectiveness is owed to Ledger, who posthumously received an Oscar for his performance. But credit also belongs to the thrilling action sequences, twisty plot and propulsive score by Hans Zimmer.

From: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/21/watching/dc-universe-comics-stream-batman-superman.html

Batman’s penis is in a comic book for the first time ever — but not for long

Like the hero it’s attached to, Batman’s penis has traditionally worked undercover. But that changed this week as DC Comics exposed Batman’s Batmember to the world for the first time ever — and then hastily decided to take it away.

In a panel from the new Batman: Damned No. 1, written by Brian Azzarello with art by Lee Bermejo, the superhero’s penis, seemingly tired from a night of trying to solve the Joker’s murder, is seen leaning to Batman’s hard right, resting behind a pair of turgid thighs and just below a chiseled waist. The shot is presented in shadow, but it’s nonetheless clear what we’re seeing: the first-ever exposure of Batman’s manhood.

(Move the slider on the image below to see the uncensored, NSFW version.)

Batman’s censored and uncensored penis

The issue doubles as the first exposure of DC’s Black Label, a brand new imprint aimed at mature readers; Batman: Damned is the first published title of a planned slate that also includes new Superman and Wonder Woman stories and that DC promises will comprise “classy, collectible superhero stories aimed at mature readers looking to be challenged and surprised as they’re entertained.” (It should be noted that the characters appearing in Black Label books do not share continuity with DC’s main comic book universe.)

In that context, exposing Batman’s Dick Grayson to the world is a brilliant marketing move from DC. Superhero nudity — particularly of the male variety — almost never happens in mainstream comics. (One notable exception: the free-swinging Doctor Manhattan in Watchman.) So introducing Black Label with some never-before-seen Bruce Wayne was guaranteed to get people talking (and joking) about the book.

But shortly after sending comics fans into a tizzy of sophomoric jokes and puns (not unlike the ones in this article), DC Black Label made an even savvier move: According to Comic Book Resources, the panel in question has now been digitally censored because it was not “additive to the story”; additionally, “future printings of the issue will use the altered panels.”

DC’s dismissal of the image as “not additive” to the story feels a little disingenuous in the context of Black Label’s stated mission. It’s hard to imagine a scenario outside of a sex scene where nudity would be additive to a story — however, it would be additive to the “mature” reputation of an aimed specifically at adult readers. (After all, there’s plenty of bloody darkness and violence in DC’s existing comics.) It also brings to mind some of the egregiously risqué female costumes in mainstream comics that don’t seem “additive” to the story beyond providing titillating thrills.

Nonetheless, by censoring its own book, DC Black Label has essentially made the first printing of Batman: Damned No. 1 a limited edition, and perhaps a collector’s item — and ensured that people are going to pay attention to whatever the imprint does next to “challenge and surprise” readers.

From: https://www.vox.com/2018/9/20/17882502/batmans-penis-nude-comic-book

Captain Marvel and the Long, Strange History of Female Superhero Names

Before Captain Marvel was Captain Marvel, someone else was Captain Marvel. And that someone else was a dude. Someone else was Captain Marvel before him, too.

The nominatively deterministic history of Captain Marvel—Carol Danvers, Earth pilot with alien superpowers, hero of a Marvel movie coming out in March—in fact is also the history of women superheroes and how comic books have changed over their 80 years.

So armor up; let’s get to it.

A Mar-vellous Origin

When Marvel Comics introduced Carol Danvers in 1968, she was a supporting character in the publisher’s book Captain Marvel, which was about an alien soldier named Mar-Vell (yeah, I know) who protects the Earth with what’s essentially an augmented Superman powerset—flight, durability, strength, and so on.

Related Stories

  • The First Captain Marvel Trailer Will Pummel You with ’90s Nostalgia

  • Star Wars and the Battle of the Ever-More-Toxic Fan Culture

  • Thor: Ragnarok Is Quietly the Queerest Superhero Movie Yet

Another wrinkle: this Captain Marvel isn’t DC Comics’ Captain Marvel, who also had an augmented Superman powerset but was actually a plucky orphan named Billy Batson gifted with magic powers by a wizard. When Billy said the word “Shazam!”—an acronym for the abilities of Samson, Hercules, Atlas, Zeus, Achilles, Mercury, and yes, I know—he was transformed into a strapping, red-besuited monster fighter. Created just a year after Superman by CC Beck and Bill Parker for Fawcett Comics, that Captain Marvel couldn’t defeat the lawsuit that DC launched in the 1950s, claiming infringement on Superman. DC eventually absorbed Fawcett and the Marvel family into mainline Superman/Batman/Wonder Woman continuity, but eventual legal trouble with Marvel Comics resulted, decades later, in the character being known only as Shazam, which had been the name of the Wizard. (See: Frankenstein.) DC Entertainment’s Shazam movie comes out in April, and as far as I know he’ll be the only superhero who can’t say his own name without losing his powers.

(Also, what happens to Billy’s body when Shazam lightning-bolts into the picture is the subject of some dispute. Is it Billy’s 13-year-old brain in the new body, as the upcoming movie seems to suggest? Does the replaced body go dormant in some alternate universe? That’s what the writer Alan Moore eventually suggested in his grim 1980s take on the character, Miracleman, itself based on a more direct British ripoff of Captain Marvel called Marvelman, which was changed in the US for, again, legal reasons. And, and, at one point Marvel’s Captain Marvel had the same problem, sharing space with a teenager; the two switched places between our universe and the alternate Negative Zone. Tired yet? Good.)

Back to Carol Danvers! She got killed in a Captain Marvel fight, but only comic-book killed, because she came back in the 1970s. It turned out her exposure to the energies of an alien machine called the Pysche-Magnetron gave her the same powers as Captain Marvel … so she put on a gratuitously revealing version of his costume (super-men get body suits and armor; super-women all too often get bikinis) and took the name Ms. Marvel. Which opens up a whole other conversation.

They’ll Be Miss-ing You

The naming of women superheroes is, as TS Eliot kind of said, a serious matter. For years, decades even, women superheroes were often gender-swapped versions of existing male characters. And patriarchy didn’t stop there. Did Superman have a Superwoman? No! (Well, yes, but it’s complicated.) He had Supergirl. And so too we had Batgirl, Hawkgirl, Miss Arrowette, Miss Martian, Mary Marvel, Spider-Girl, She-Hulk, She-Thing … the naming was uncreative at best, infantilizing at worst. (A major exception: Catwoman, Batman’s forever foe and romantic partner. She started out as the Cat and then got needlessly specific.)

Now, before Batgirl there was a Batwoman, created as a foil and love interest for Batman (and to show that there was nothing untoward going on between Batman and Robin). But she was too equal, and eventually the publisher wrote her out, recapitulating the biblical myth of Lilith, Adam’s all-too-equal wife in the Garden of Eden before he complained to God and had her kicked out in favor of Eve, who was nominally more compliant until the whole apple thing. Like Lilith—who was cursed with infertility and forced to haunt the night collecting semen spilled during masturbation, becoming mother to the seductive sex demons the incubi and succubi (and grandmother, then, to all the vampires)—Batwoman, too, has a more interesting side story. Not that interesting, but interesting. Nowadays she’s a former soldier, a lesbian, kicking a lot of ass, and wearing arguably the best costume in comics today. She’s scheduled to show up in the Arrowverse of DC-based television shows on the CW this season, potentially in advance of her own show.

My point here is, you might be underwhelmed by a character being named Ms. Marvel—but maybe don’t be. It wasn’t weird to see an honorific in a superhero or villain name: there were Misters (Terrific, Fantastic, Mind, E) and Doctors (Strange, Fate, Octopus, Midnight, Manhattan). And in the 1970s, “Ms.” was still in contention. It symbolized that decade’s spreading wave of feminism, so much so that it was the name of a whole magazine about feminism (the very first issue of which featured Wonder Woman on the cover). Like new cultural awareness over the possibilities of pronouns today, the idea of a honorific for women that didn’t point to their marital status or age was both revolutionary and necessary. It was perhaps no accident that Ms. Marvel had a precognitive “sixth sense;” acquiring superpowers had literally raised her consciousness. (Also, Marvel Comics already had a Marvel Girl—Jean Grey, the mutant telepath and telekinetic member of the X-Men who would eventually become the genocidal, cosmically powerful Phoenix.)

Coming Into Her Own

The thing is, empowering name be damned, Ms. Marvel didn’t have the best run in the Marvel Universe in the 1970s and 1980s. She didn’t have much of a clear mission. She was sexually assaulted; she got handed an unfortunate brainwashing-and-pregnancy storyline. She didn’t save many universes. This can happen with female derivations of male characters; without a good writer or an editorial push, they’re just characters with the same powers as another character. It’s hard to build differentiable stories around that. Instead, Ms. Marvel got a kicky new black costume and lost her powers and memories while another character, Monica Rambeau—able to turn into any form of electromagnetic radiation—took on the Captain Marvel name for a while. (She eventually switched to Photon, and then Pulsar, and then Spectrum.)

Meanwhile, Carol went to space to fight aliens with the X-Men, where she somehow acquired the powers of a “white hole,” the opposite of a black hole. So she could shoot energy and gravity and fly in space. Carol took the name Binary—it didn’t have the same gender connotations then. Eventually, she lost those powers, reacquired the Ms. Marvel powerset, and reacquired Binary’s energy projection powers as well. She became part of various Avengers teams, and starred in a few of her own titles, none very long-lived.

Then in the mid-2000s, Marvel (the publisher) returned to Marvel (the lady). She got a well-designed new costume, roughly the one you’ll see in the movie, and on the urging of the Avenger with the vibranium shield swapped the “Ms.” for “Captain.” Again, lots of heroes and villains use the trick of leveling up via military rank, but despite women’s longtime service in America’s armed forces, few female-identifying heroes have done so.

Marvel’s editors had noticed, I think, that while they had many women heroes and villains, they didn’t have one as powerful as Superman or Wonder Woman—and, in fact, didn’t have anyone in that power class who wasn’t also a tortured monster. Thor, maybe. The persistent appeal of Wonder Woman as a character over at DC (and the success of her movie) helped. So too did the drive in comics and comic-based movies to be more reflective of the diversity in the real world. All those forces spiraled toward building the Carol Danvers version of Captain Marvel into a Superman-level hero, both power-wise and symbolically. In the comics, she’d become a significant philosophical foil for the company’s other high-powered character, Iron Man, elevated to star status by movies. And the post-credits sequence of Avengers: Infinity War strongly implies that Captain Marvel will be the deus that the machina throws at Thanos.

She’s also an inspiration—not just to all kinds of fans, but inside the canon. There’s another Ms. Marvel now, a young shapeshifter named Kamala Khan who wears a variant of that kicky black costume I mentioned. Though some reprehensible elements of comics fandom continue to kvetch about it, comics creators and movie makers have increasingly come to understand that having many different kinds of people tell stories about many different kinds of people expands the audience pool and makes the stories, broadly, better. The arc of the Marvel Universe is long—but it bends toward justice.


More Great WIRED Stories

From: https://www.wired.com/story/captain-marvel-female-superhero-names/

DC Comics Movies: 5 Reasons Recasting Superman Is A Problem

The news has been going crazy lately with reports that Henry Cavill could potentially be done with his role as Superman. It’s probably too soon to tell as to whether or not Cavill is truly leaving DC comics movies, but it does have us thinking. Here are 5 reasons why we think Superman shouldn’t be re-casted.

1. It Would Be A Continuity Nightmare for DC Comics Movies

Seriously. Warner Bros. has enough problems with their DC universe as it is. To recast Superman would be jarring to the narrative. Even providing some logical reason for it within the universe would be hard to pull off. At least not without having audiences feel like it’s forced.

DC Comics Movies
Image from DC Entertainment

We also haven’t really seen this version of Superman all that much. Yes, we have MAN OF STEEL… but that’s on the origin story. Plus, BATMAN v. SUPERMAN and JUSTICE LEAGUE are so chock full of other characters and issues that we haven’t really seen Superman just be Superman.

So far, he’s either been learning to use his powers and place in the world, in conflict with his actions and the people he’s trying to save, dead, or back to life for a quick fight with Steppenwolf. We’ve yet to see Henry Cavill’s Superman in a prolonged amount of time where he’s confident in who he is and his position in the universe. In other words: He’s just getting started, coming into his own as Superman.

Recasting, especially with some kind of narrative reason, would more than likely throw all of that character development and subsequent audience investment away; which would suck. Fact.

2. We Finally Have The DC Trinity

We finally have a universe of DC comics movies where the DC Trinity are all present and exist. They’ve interacted with each other, they’ve fought against and with each other. It’s awesome and comes from the stuff of comics fans’ dreams. A recasting of Superman could mean that those interactions never happened with this new Superman.

Furthermore, even if Superman just gets a recasting with no narrative explanation, it wouldn’t be the same as Henry Cavill’s Clark working with Ben Affleck’s Bruce. Even if Warner Bros. tries their hardest to make a potential recasting seamless, there would still be a new dynamic at play with a different actor.

DC Comics Movies
Image from DC Entertainment

Maybe that dynamic would be better, but it would still be different. Viewers would still probably think of Cavill, which would more than likely pull audiences away from the story. That would not be ideal.

3. Warner Bros. Needs To Earn Another SUPERMAN Film

While I don’t think Cavill should be re-casted as Superman, I do think that the next step should be waiting a while until a SUPERMAN sequel happens. MAN OF STEEL is okay but has its controversy. BATMAN v SUPERMAN is just not good. JUSTICE LEAGUE had potential but misses the mark. None of these DC comics movies listed are major successes or wins for Warner Bros.

In my opinion, Warner Bros. should spend some time away from Superman for a while and let audiences want him a little more, building a stronger appetite. In all honesty, they should probably do the same with Batman, but Matt Reeves’ BATMAN is already in the works, so there you go. For the record, most of what I’m saying for Henry Cavill’s Superman can and should be said for Ben Affleck’s Batman. The same issues with recasting apply if not more so.

DC Comics Movies
Image from DC Entertainment

Included in The Hollywood Reporter’s article on Cavill’s rumored departure was a line suggesting that it was Warner Bros. who made the decision to part ways. Furthermore, the report goes on to say that it’s coupled with Warner Bros. deciding to recast Batman as well, with a new actor playing Bruce Wayne in Matt Reeve’s upcoming film, instead of current Batman actor Ben Affleck.

Warner Bros. has essentially created for themselves a train wreck where there are good parts and characters among the dumpster fires they call films. They need to earn the right in fans minds to make another Superman film or Batman film. So, if Warner Bros. should stay away from their biggest characters for a while, what do they do in the meantime? I’m glad you asked…

4. Warner Bros. Should Focus On Their Various Other DC Comics Movies, Not Recast!

If you’re not having a Superman film for a while, as The Hollywood Reporter is suggesting, why recast? Focus on the huge library and trove of characters at your disposal, Warner Bros.! Make that AQUAMAN movie! Let SHAZAM! be a comedy! Double down on the WONDER WOMAN promotion because she’s the best thing you’ve got right now.

DC Comics Movies
Image from DC Entertainment

Warner Bros. needs to flesh out their universe, which has so far been largely disappointing. JUSTICE LEAGUE was a rush job. There shouldn’t have only been four films before it. There should have been much more. The AQUAMAN, FLASH, and CYBORG films should all have come before, not after.

Batman should have had his own solo movie. Heck, even BATMAN v SUPERMAN should have been its own movie, without all of the DAWN OF JUSTICE parts. If Warner Bros. truly wants to have success, especially with one of their biggest characters like Superman, they need to create a decent universe for him to effectively operate in first. Don’t recast, just wait and make some other DC comics movies first.

5. If You Gotta Recast, Recast Right

Perhaps Warner Bros. decides to just go ahead and recast, which again, seems really ill-advised. At the very least they should cast the right person. Two specific actors seem to be at the forefront of most fan’s minds currently.

Micheal B. Jordan’s name was one of the first to pop up in the reports following the one about Cavill’s supposed exit after talks for him to cameo in SHAZAM! allegedly fell through. Micheal B. Jordan has been on a bit of a winning streak with some of his latest roles, such as in CREED and Marvel’s BLACK PANTHER. Both of those roles won Jordan praise from both critics and audiences alike.

DC Comics Movies
Image from artist Bosslogic

Seeing a person of color playing such a huge American icon would be incredible. It would really say something about Warner Bros. attempts for diversity in their DC comics movies as well as a step in the right direction for our culture in general. If someone absolutely has to replace Henry Cavill as Superman, I wouldn’t have any qualms with Micheal B. Jordan taking the reigns as a new Superman.

Honorable Mention: Maybe Super Hamm?

Then there’s the other actor pick: Jon Hamm. Jon Hamm is constantly being recruited by fans to be the new Batman. And rightly so. If Hamm ever does get the role of Bruce Wayne, he’ll for sure knock it out of the park. He has the right charm to play the billionaire playboy by day, and it’s not hard to imagine seeing him easily transition into the brooding vigilante by night. He’s got the chops.

DC Comics Movies
Image from AMC

However…what about Superman? Could he pull it off? I’ll say it’s just as easy for me to see Hamm play Superman as I can for Batman. I can totally picture him fumbling around as Clark Kent, and then heroically rushing to save the day as Superman does. Perhaps one day we’ll see it, but hopefully, it won’t come to that. With any luck, we can get Cavill for a few more films and this report was just jumping the gun due to a simple missed cameo opportunity.

From: https://comicsverse.com/dc-comics-movies-recasting-superman/

Superman #6 Will Change Clark & Lois’ Lives ‘Forever’

Ever since taking over as the writer on both Superman and Action Comics, Brian Michael Bendis has been rocking the Man of Steel’s world to its core. However, this December, the Kent family’s status quo is poised to shaken up even further.

According to DC Comics’ solicitation for Superman #6, Kal-El will be forced to team up with longtime foe General Zod in order to take down Rogol Zaar. Apparently, though, it’s the issue’s last page that somehow “changes the lives of Superman and his family forever.”

RELATED: PREVIEW: King Kubert’s 12-Part Superman Story Has Batman Ask for Help

Check out the full solicitation below:

SUPERMAN #6

  • written by BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS
  • art and cover by IVAN REIS and JOE PRADO
  • variant cover by ADAM HUGHES
  • It’s the moment you never thought you’d see—Superman must team with General Zod to defeat Rogol Zaar or risk banishment for all three in the cold prison of the Phantom Zone forever. Whatever you do, do not skip to the last page—the end of this issue changes the lives of Superman and his family forever as the Unity Saga continues!
  • ON SALE 12.12.18
  • $3.99 US | 32 PAGES
  • FC | RATED T
  • This issue will ship with two covers.
  • Please see the order form for details.

Superman #6, by Brian Michael Bendis, Ivan Reis and Joe Prado, goes on sale December 12 from DC Comics.

KEEP READING: Bendis Goes Off the Rails in Superman #2 (and It’s Awesome!)

From: https://www.cbr.com/superman-6-lois-clark-live-change/

Page 6 of 277« First...«456789»102030...Last »

Archives