When You’re On the Wrong Side of Superman, You’re on the Wrong Side of History

superman all americansuperman all american

(Welcome to The Soapbox, the space where we get loud, feisty, political, and opinionated about anything and everything. In this edition: how a recent Superman comic is bringing out the worst side of America…and revealing what this country is supposed to stand for.)

In Action Comics #987, Superman faces a simultaneous barrage of small and large-scale calamities that see him harried, flying faster than a speeding bullet from crisis to crisis. One of them is an AR-15-wielding white guy sporting an American flag bandanna who opens fire on a group of Spanish-speaking factory workers. At the very last microsecond, Supes flies in front of the workers, shielding them from the bullets. He then berates the gunman for attempted murder (can you imagine!) and when the would-be killer bleats out that the workers stole his job and ruined him, Superman spits back that he should take responsibility for his own life.

With an ungodly to-do list, Superman then jets off to stop a spiteful activist from burning down a mansion to give the 1% what for, leaving the gunman and the workers in the hands of the local police. Yes, Superman is both against the mass murder of innocent people and against the destruction of private property. Yet his sense of fairness doesn’t work for Fox contributor Todd Starnes, who has twisted the issue to make it seem like Superman protecting innocent people is a new, liberal conspiracy meant to give pro-immigration forces a powerful ally. In Starnes’ take, Superman should have flown all the of the Spanish-speaking workers back across the border to Mexico. Since he didn’t, Starnes’ rhetorically asks, “Remember when Superman stood for truth, justice, and the American way?”

Superman Undocumented ImmigrantsSuperman Undocumented Immigrants

To get the obvious out of the way, you’ll notice I haven’t called the workers “illegal immigrants” as Starnes does. That’s because the comic issue never says they’re illegal immigrants. The gunman assumes they are, and Starnes happily and unsurprisingly takes his word for it. They work in a factory, which many Americans do. They also speak Spanish, which many Americans also do. And even if they were undocumented immigrants, they wouldn’t deserve to be gunned down by a Ted Nugent wannabe.

To get the other obvious thing out of the way, Superman is an undocumented immigrant. To be even more precise, his parents sent him here when he was a baby, but this is the only home he’s ever known (and the only home that hasn’t been blown up), which makes him an ideal candidate for DACA Dreamer status – the Obama era solution to ensuring 800,000 children brought to the United States by undocumented parents could come out of the shadows to build a life for themselves by going to school or working as a clumsy cub reporter for a big city newspaper. So, even assuming that the workers in the comic are undocumented, it’s a no-brainer that Superman would save their lives from a hail of bullets.

Superman UndocumentedSuperman Undocumented

Starnes knows this. He even writes, after asking about Superman’s status re: The American Way that, “Then again, Clark Kent is technically an illegal alien – a native of Krypton.” He stops short of adding, “…so maybe we should deport Superman?” but the sentiment is there. Starnes has no idea what to do with this little nugget of truth in his immigrant-bashing article. That’s because the only natural follow-up to recognizing Superman’s undocumented status would be, “And if Superman himself is an illegal alien, maybe we should rethink our hateful rhetoric toward them and find some compassion.”

Starnes wants Superman on his side, recognizes that he’s an “illegal alien,” but cannot vocalize that he wants an “illegal alien” on his side.

But I’m not here to call out how deeply stupid Starnes’s take on the character is. Starnes isn’t some pop culture fuddy duddy simply missing the point; his take is a purposeful, toxic misreading of Superman’s character to make it seem like saving innocent lives from being mowed down in a mass shooting is somehow new to his core philosophical structure. I say purposeful because this is Starnes’s schtick. If you haven’t heard of him (and there’s no reason you should have), his particular wheelhouse as a Fox contributor is misrepresenting and cherry-picking stories to make it seem like non-white, non-Christian people exhibit only the worst stereotypes the right wing has built their house of racial resentment upon.

His feigned bewilderment at Superman protecting innocent lives regardless of visa status is propagandizing the icon by claiming the other side is propagandizing him, which is some Lex Luthor level work. It’s also pretty much his only rhetorical option. When Superman does something you hate, you can either say Superman is wrong, or pretend that he’s been hijacked. Of course, Superman has always – even in the face of life’s ethical complications – protected the innocent from harm.

As Jacob Hall pointed out while comparing Zack Snyder’s version to the original, the Superman of the 1930s comics was a specific product of a pro-FDR, pro-New Deal and, therefore, pro-leftist era.

Created by the children of Jewish immigrants (Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster), it’s bonkers to think that Superman would ever – from 1938 to today – use his powers for “rounding up the illegals and flying them back to where they came from” as Starnes demands. As Rich Goldstein points out in his expansive look at Supes as a Jewish superhero, “Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster were ten years old when Senator Ellison DuRant Smith gave his famous ‘Shut The Door’ speech on immigration in the lead up to the passage of the 1924 Immigration Act. . . That is why, for 74 years Superman’s primary nemesis has not been another alien or superhero, but megalomaniacal xenophobic billionaire Lex Luthor.”

You can see how that’s another fact Starnes has to ignore (and is happy to ignore!) in crafting his angry little epithet-laced missive to rouse the nation’s uncles to shake their fist at the artistic establishment so deeply, deeply misusing good ol’ Superman for their own nefarious means of indoctrinating children with empathy.

If you think about it for more than a second, his argument is xenophobic garbage. Which is why Starnes doesn’t want you to think about it that long. Who Superman is. Who he’s always been. How Dan Jurgens, the writer of this arc, has been a particularly conscientious steward of that persona. Starnes wants to steal Superman for a cruel political ideology and claim it as the sole version of “American.” We cannot let him.

I mean, sure, Starnes’ reading of the character is also non-sensical. Superman ends the encounter by leaving the would-be shooter and the workers in the charge of the local police. Is Starnes saying Superman should be anti-police?

Supes challenges the shooter to be responsible for his own lot in life. Is Starnes against personal responsibility?

Superman flies off to save a millionaire’s home from being burned instead of, as Starnes demands, dragging workers who very well could be American citizens off to a foreign country. Is Starnes anti-capitalism?

You see how easy twisting this stuff into braindead propaganda is?

It also makes sense why Starnes is so terrified of being on the wrong side of Superman. In another era when the KKK was resurgent (deep sigh), back when Superman was the hottest ticket in town, activist and cool name-owner Stetson Kennedy infiltrated the murdering hate group specifically to learn their secrets and deliver them to the producers of the Superman radio show for a special 16-part episode called “The Clan of the Fiery Cross.” Children listened to that 1940s series, and KKK recruitment fell off a cliff.

It’s not safe to be on the wrong side of Superman.

Thus, the thrust of Starnes’s propaganda move here is that the angry white American is righteous regardless of his actions. If that were true, Starnes’ thinking goes, Superman should be on that angry white guy’s side. Since it’s not true, Starnes is trying to hijack Superman in order to make that angry white American righteousness justified. He can’t square the circle (tough to do when your premise is month-old banana slime scotch-taped to NRA pamphlets), and his willingness to bend the truth of the character to a breaking point only reveals himself and an entire line of thinking as thoroughly anti-Superman.

The actions undertaken in Action Comics #987 that have Starnes and others on the right so riled have always been in Superman’s character, but they must pretend this is a sudden new change from progressive conspirators because the alternative is something they can’t accept. They’re on the wrong side of Superman, which means they’re on the wrong side of truth, the wrong side of justice, and the wrong side of America.

What’s profoundly appropriate about all of this is why Superman is hustling from one calamity to the next in the issue to begin with: a powerful villain is stoking anger and resentment to bring out the worst in people.

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From: http://www.slashfilm.com/superman-comic-controversy/

Superman saved undocumented workers from a racist — and conservative media is mad about it

The latest issue of Action Comics No. 987 contains a scalding scene: A white supremacist, fed up with a company that just laid him off, decides to load up his machine gun and kill the undocumented workers he believes took his job. Luckily, in the nick of time, Superman arrives to shield the would-be victims from a storm of bullets:


Action Comics No. 987.
DC Comics

Superman then subdues the shooter, telling him that he needs to take more personal responsibility and to rethink his homicidal tendencies. He also tells the police officers who respond to the incident to see to it that the shooter’s intended victims are safe:


DC Comics

Given the violent events that took place in Charlottesville, Virginia, last month, including a domestic terror attack that killed Heather Heyer, as well as the recent national conversation over the Trump administration’s stance on DACA, it’s easy to see how the plot of Action Comics No. 987 could feel like a knee-jerk reaction and parallel to reality. But in reality, comic book issues and arcs — including this one, which was written by Dan Jurgens and illustrated by artists Viktor Bogdanovic, inkers Jonathan Glapion and Jay Leisten, and colorist Mike Spicer — are planned well in advance.

Still, the action of preventing a mass murder, which seems in line with Superman’s moral compass, hasn’t come without controversy. Fox News has a column calling the Man of Steel a “propaganda tool for the defenders of illegal aliens,” and the right-wing website Breitbart derided him as “Social Justice Supes.”

Their argument is that comic book writers and artists have inserted a pro–illegal immigrant agenda into their comics, and that it’s part of a larger trend of politicizing comic books.

But there are a couple of things to note about the issue.

The first is that the “undocumented workers” designation in Action Comics No. 987 comes from the homicidal white supremacist — an unreliable narrator. It could be interpreted that he’s shooting at the workers at his company who aren’t white because he’s stereotyping and projecting his bigotry onto them.

Another facet of this issue is that in the universe of the comic, similar violent outbursts and anger are happening worldwide. Vaccines are being stolen, animals are being poached, workplaces are being shot up, prison riots are taking place — and Superman is struggling to figure out why it’s all erupting at once. The thwarted workplace shooting is part of a bigger arc that involves the idea that the “common good” has been dissolved, and there’s a villain responsible for it (the issue has a giant reveal at the end).

Perhaps the most entertaining aspect of any conversation bemoaning Superman’s lifesaving actions is the failure to realize that Superman himself is a literal alien immigrant who grew up in America. Superman’s creators, Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, are the children of Jewish immigrants.

And Superman has always stood up for the justice of all Americans, as he did in this 1950s poster:


“If you hear anybody talk against a schoolmate or anyone else because of his religion, race or national origin — don’t wait: tell him that kind of talk is un-American,” Superman says in the scene on the poster.

This week’s issue of Action Comics, despite the outcry against it, seems to be following that credo.

From: https://www.vox.com/culture/2017/9/15/16307794/superman-undocumented-workers-white-supremacist-action-comics

‘Justice League’ Flash Photo Contains ‘Superman: The Movie’ Homage

The Justice League Movie Gallery Gallery

From: http://comicbook.com/dc/2017/09/17/justice-league-flash-superman-the-movie/

Heroes and Villains Fan Fest is one big costume party

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The Heroes and Villains Fan Fest of New York/New Jersey 2017 took place on Sept. 16, 2017.
Ricardo Kaulessar/NorthJersey.com

Superman (with a beard, no less) was waiting outside the Meadowlands Exposition Center in Secaucus on Saturday morning posing for photos with admirers, while holding a copy of a 1963 Superman comic book that shows the DC Comics icon also with a beard.

No, it was not the man from Krypton taking a detour on his way to Metropolis, but rather he was waiting with Wonder Woman for the Heroes and Villains Fan Fest New York/New Jersey 2017 to begin. 

This is the third time since January 2016 that the two-day event has been held in New Jersey, which brings thousands of fans of comics-related shows such as “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” and “Arrow” to meet their favorite actors from those shows, as well as attracts fans of comic books and iconic movies that have plenty of costumes. And many of the attendees also came dressed as their favorite characters, known as cosplay.

Superman a.k.a. Joseph Garcia of Bayonne came with his wife, Sonja, who was dressed as the Amazon warrior. Garcia said he went to similar events while living in Germany, and when he returned to the U.S., he wanted to attend events like the Fan Fest where he gets to be his favorite superhero.

“You go to New York Comic-Con or San Diego Comic-Con, yeah, you got a whole bunch of people, but here it’s got a small atmosphere,” Garcia said. “You can see the people, meet new friends, see your old friends, and just enjoy the atmosphere.”

Garcia was looking forward to seeing Brandon Routh, who famously played Superman in the 2006 film, “Superman Returns,” but now can be seen on the small screen as Ray Palmer/Atom on the TV series, “Legends of Tomorrow.”

Inside the center, people waited on line to get autographs from actors including Routh, to see a QA panel with various stars such as Ming-Na Wen from “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.,” purchase a collectible from vendors, and/or cross paths with Spider Man, Harley Quinn, Chewbacca, and even Steve from “Blue’s Clues.”

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Diego Escobar, his girlfriend Raquel Murillo and her younger sister Esperanza Murillo, all from North Bergen, were Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles for the day. They came to see their favorite actors from “Arrow” including its star Stephen Amell and Caity Lotz, who plays Esperanza’s favorite character on the show, White Canary. 

“This is the first time we dressed up. Last time, we came in regular clothes,” said Raquel Murillo about attending the Fan Fest last year. “It’s a lot of fun being in costume.”

Observing all the goings-on was Jeff Beck, the owner of Montclair-based comic book store East Side Mags, along with his co-worker Pele Marques, were first-timers at the Fan Fest. He hoped to see celebrities such as Katrina Law, who grew up in South Jersey and who plays Nyssa al Ghul on “Arrow.” 

“It’s great, we got cosplayers, people dressed up as all different kinds of characters, tons of celebrities, everybody is a fan,” Beck said. “A lot of people are here looking to buy stuff from us that can get signed by the celebrities. It’s a little different than the normal comic convention where people are just looking for certain issues.”

Not in costume but just as happy to be present was actor Rick Gonzalez, one of other stars of “Arrow,” who plays Rene Ramirez/Wild Dog. The Brooklyn-born Gonzalez has done the Fan Fest in Portland and Nashville, but he said this one in New Jersey was meaningful to him as he wanted to be part of the “hometown energy.” 

Gonzalez was especially appreciative of meeting fans like one he saw during the early part of the event. Gonzalez noted that the man came dressed as Wild Dog in such a detailed manner that it had Gonzalez amazed as he showed a reporter a picture that he took with this special fan.

“That’s the ultimate compliment you can give; someone really took the time to find the costume and really put it together,” Gonzalez said. “This guy today, man, he brought it.

“Literally, the same pants I wore, the same boots I wear, the jersey looked identical. Looked like one of the costume designers gave it to him. I was like, ‘Dude, did you go to the show?’ It was perfect. Best compliment.”

Email: kaulessar@northjersey.com

 

From: http://www.northjersey.com/story/entertainment/2017/09/16/heroes-and-villains-fan-fest-one-big-costume-party/662908001/

Superman saved undocumented workers from a racist — and … – Vox

The latest issue of Action Comics No. 987 contains a scalding scene: A white supremacist, fed up with a company that just laid him off, decides to load up his machine gun and kill the undocumented workers he believes took his job. Luckily, in the nick of time, Superman arrives to shield the would-be victims from a storm of bullets:


Action Comics No. 987.
DC Comics

Superman then subdues the shooter, telling him that he needs to take more personal responsibility and to rethink his homicidal tendencies. He also tells the police officers who respond to the incident to see to it that the shooter’s intended victims are safe:


DC Comics

Given the violent events that took place in Charlottesville, Virginia, last month, including a domestic terror attack that killed Heather Heyer, as well as the recent national conversation over the Trump administration’s stance on DACA, it’s easy to see how the plot of Action Comics No. 987 could feel like a knee-jerk reaction and parallel to reality. But in reality, comic book issues and arcs — including this one, which was written by Dan Jurgens and illustrated by artists Viktor Bogdanovic, inkers Jonathan Glapion and Jay Leisten, and colorist Mike Spicer — are planned well in advance.

Still, the action of preventing a mass murder, which seems in line with Superman’s moral compass, hasn’t come without controversy. Fox News has a column calling the Man of Steel a “propaganda tool for the defenders of illegal aliens,” and the right-wing website Breitbart derided him as “Social Justice Supes.”

Their argument is that comic book writers and artists have inserted a pro–illegal immigrant agenda into their comics, and that it’s part of a larger trend of politicizing comic books.

But there are a couple of things to note about the issue.

The first is that the “undocumented workers” designation in Action Comics No. 987 comes from the homicidal white supremacist — an unreliable narrator. It could be interpreted that he’s shooting at the workers at his company who aren’t white because he’s stereotyping and projecting his bigotry onto them.

Another facet of this issue is that in the universe of the comic, similar violent outbursts and anger are happening worldwide. Vaccines are being stolen, animals are being poached, workplaces are being shot up, prison riots are taking place — and Superman is struggling to figure out why it’s all erupting at once. The thwarted workplace shooting is part of a bigger arc that involves the idea that the “common good” has been dissolved, and there’s a villain responsible for it (the issue has a giant reveal at the end).

Perhaps the most entertaining aspect of any conversation bemoaning Superman’s lifesaving actions is the failure to realize that Superman himself is a literal alien immigrant who grew up in America. Superman’s creators, Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, are the children of Jewish immigrants.

And Superman has always stood up for the justice of all Americans, as he did in this 1950s poster:


“If you hear anybody talk against a schoolmate or anyone else because of his religion, race or national origin — don’t wait: tell him that kind of talk is un-American,” Superman says in the scene on the poster.

This week’s issue of Action Comics, despite the outcry against it, seems to be following that credo.

From: https://www.vox.com/culture/2017/9/15/16307794/superman-undocumented-workers-white-supremacist-action-comics

Superman Protects Undocumented Workers From Armed White Supremacist in Latest Comic

Perhaps it is just a coincidence, but perhaps not. 

In the recent issue of Action Comics #987, “The Oz Effect,” released Wednesday, Superman arrives in the nick of time to protect a group of undocumented immigrants from a white man sporting an American flag bandanna, wielding a machine gun, who is going to shoot them for taking his job. 

Superman blocks the bullets before they hit the terrified people. 

“Stop this!” Superman orders the gunman.

“Why?!” he responds. “They ruined me! Stole from me!” 

Grabbing the gunman by the collar and pulling him in close, Superman says, “The only person responsible for the blackness smothering your soul — is you!” 

Police arrive, and Superman hands over the gunman and tells officers to make sure the victims are “safe and cared for.” An officer responds, “Anything you say, Superman!” 

The moment comes just one week after President Donald Trump made the controversial announcement that he was ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy put in place by former President Barack Obama. He then gave Congress a window to save the program.

Still, the decision was decried by politicians, civil groups and celebrities alike. Nearly 800,000 individuals, known as Dreamers, have received protection to stay in the country through the program. 

In addition to the DACA announcement, Trump was also slammed for comments he made just a few weeks prior when he appeared to be defending a group of white nationalists holding a rally in Charlottesville, Va., at which one protester to the rally was killed and numerous others injured. 

Action Comics #987 is by Dan Jurgens, Viktor Bogdanovic, Jonathan Glapion, Jay Leisten and Mike Spicer. 

From: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat-vision/superman-protects-undocumented-workers-armed-white-supremacist-latest-comic-1038448

Superman Protects Undocumented Workers From Armed White …

Perhaps it is just a coincidence, but perhaps not. 

In the recent issue of Action Comics #987, “The Oz Effect,” released Wednesday, Superman arrives in the nick of time to protect a group of undocumented immigrants from a white man sporting an American flag bandanna, wielding a machine gun, who is going to shoot them for taking his job. 

Superman blocks the bullets before they hit the terrified people. 

“Stop this!” Superman orders the gunman.

“Why?!” he responds. “They ruined me! Stole from me!” 

Grabbing the gunman by the collar and pulling him in close, Superman says, “The only person responsible for the blackness smothering your soul — is you!” 

Police arrive, and Superman hands over the gunman and tells officers to make sure the victims are “safe and cared for.” An officer responds, “Anything you say, Superman!” 

The moment comes just one week after President Donald Trump made the controversial announcement that he was ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy put in place by former President Barack Obama. He then gave Congress a window to save the program.

Still, the decision was decried by politicians, civil groups and celebrities alike. Nearly 800,000 individuals, known as Dreamers, have received protection to stay in the country through the program. 

In addition to the DACA announcement, Trump was also slammed for comments he made just a few weeks prior when he appeared to be defending a group of white nationalists holding a rally in Charlottesville, Va., at which one protester to the rally was killed and numerous others injured. 

Action Comics #987 is by Dan Jurgens, Viktor Bogdanovic, Jonathan Glapion, Jay Leisten and Mike Spicer. 

From: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat-vision/superman-protects-undocumented-workers-armed-white-supremacist-latest-comic-1038448

Biggest comic revelation of the year comes out this week for Superman

DC Comics has been teasing us all year with the identity of “Mr. Oz,” the dark figure lurking in the background of Superman titles all year.

Earlier this year, it was revealed that Doctor Manhattan of “The Watchmen” universe has also been playing around with the DC Multiverse, so many assumed that Mr. Oz was the hero/villain Ozymandias from the same universe.

Me included. It was so obvious, how could it not be him?

I’m not saying it is or it isn’t, but any fan of DC Comics needs to grab “Action Comics” No. 987, (DC / $3.99) which comes out Wednesday and learn the truth. It’s Part 1 of “The Oz Effect” storyline and the identity of Mr. Oz is revealed. We also begin to see his motivation and get an idea of where he is going.

It’s the best $3.99 you’ll spend all summer. Written by Superman veteran Dan Jurgens with amazing art by Viktor Bogdanovic, this is a winner. Splurge and buy the lenticular moving cover.

More interesting is the timing. This is the 987th issue of “Action Comics,” where Superman made his debut in 1938. Need I remind anyone that he was created right here in Cleveland by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster? Didn’t think so.

This means that there are only 13 issues left before “Action Comics” becomes the first comic title to reach the magical 1,000th issue. One thousand issues published over 80 years is incredible. Action was monthly most of that time, though there was a period from 1988 to 1989 when it came out weekly and featured a rotating cast of heroes in their adventures — rarely featuring Superman himself.

It returned to monthly status with Superman in the lead “where he belongs,” the cover stated.

The year of weekly issues pushed “Action Comics” past “Detective Comics,” featuring Batman, as the longest running comics title in the world.

The point is, DC must have something incredible lined up for the 1,000th issue. With the current Mr. Oz and Dr. Manhattan storylines going, it all just might come to a conclusion with that milestone issue.

No doubt that Superman is back!

From: http://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/index.ssf/2017/09/biggest_comic_revelation_of_th.html

Len Wein, Influential Comic Book Writer, Dies at 69

The character proved both durable and adaptable, turning up over the years on television and in film. And Mr. Wein became an early example of a change that would wake up the somewhat predictable world of comics, one that made the stories deeper and more ambitious.

“For more than a decade, from the early ’70s to the mid-’80s, as both a writer and an editor, he really sat on the leading edge of what the comics medium could be as it was growing up,” Paul Levitz, author of “75 Years of DC Comics: The Art of Modern Mythmaking,” said in an interview on Monday.

In 1975, Mr. Wein joined with the artist David Cockrum to relaunch Marvel Comics’ X-Men, the team of mutant superheroes created in 1963 by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. Mr. Wein and Mr. Cockrum created new characters, including Storm, Nightcrawler and Colossus.

Photo

Len Wein in an undated photograph.

Credit
DC Comics

Wolverine, who first appeared in an “Incredible Hulk” story Mr. Wein wrote, also joined the X-Men universe, which yielded not only many comics but also a profitable series of movies.

Mr. Wein was an editor for Marvel, DC and Disney Comics. He brought the British writer Alan Moore into the Swamp Thing series in the early 1980s, and in 1986 he was editor on the Watchmen series by Mr. Moore, the artist Dave Gibbons and the colorist John Higgins. That work, Mr. Levitz, said, was “arguably the most important comic published by a traditional comics publisher in the ’80s” and helped usher in the era of the graphic novel.

Mr. Wein and Ms. Valada were married in 1991. Mr. Wein’s previous marriage, to Glynis Oliver, a colorist who worked with him, ended in divorce. In addition to his wife, he is survived by a stepson, Michael Bieniewicz-Valada.

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Ms. Valada said Mr. Wein had recently returned to writing Swamp Thing. But his favorite characters to write, she said, were two he did not create: Batman and the Incredible Hulk.

That suggests a fondness for tradition, but Mr. Wein in fact helped bring a younger, innovative sensibility to the art form. Years ago, barely in his 20s, he got a sense of the generational divide in the comic-book-making world of the time when he worked on the television-tie-in comics for “Star Trek” being published by Gold Key. The staff there, he once said at a panel discussion, was on the older side.

“I was the first guy to write the book who actually ever watched the show,” he said. “I sent all kinds of notes: ‘You know the backpacks? They don’t really need the backpacks. They want anything, they pick up the silly little phone things and call, and it gets teleported down.’ ”


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From: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/11/arts/design/len-wein-influential-comic-book-writer-dies-at-69.html

Fan Expo 2017 & DC Comics Rebirth Spoilers: Superman In Action Comics #989 Final Cover Reveals Mr. Oz Identity?!

Fan Expo 2017 and DC Comics Rebirth Spoilers for Superman In Action Comics #989 follows.

During Fan Expo 2017 week, DC Comics revealed the final cover to Action Comics #989 which is part 3 of the 4 part The Oz Effect that will see Mr. Oz’s identity exposed.

It all begins in Action Comics #987…

…then Action Comics #988…

…followed by Action Comics #989 which was originally solicited like this…

…yet now looks like this.

Mr. Oz sure looks like a Kryptonian, perhaps Superman’s dad Jor-el if the cover to Action Comics #987 is to be believed. Yet, how does this all tie into Dr. Manhattan and the Doomsday Clock #1?

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From: http://insidepulse.com/2017/09/04/fan-expo-2017-dc-comics-rebirth-spoilers-superman-in-action-comics-989-final-cover-reveals-mr-oz-identity/

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