Superman Reveals Why He Doesn’t Shut Off His Super Hearing

Superman has many abilities, but few connect him to the plights of humanity like his super hearing, and there’s one key reason he never shuts it off.

Spoilers incoming for Superman #2 so if you haven’t read the issue yet you’ve been warned.

In the new issue of Superman Clark ponders a question from Green Arrow, who asked Clark if his “life was hell.” When Clark asked why Arrow said “Actual Hell! Because you can never turn off your super-hearing. You can’t not see the madness of the world with your super-vision. You can’t stop seeing and hearing all the horrors of the world.”

It’s here that Clark dispels that theory, saying “First of all…yes, I can. I can turn it off anytime I want. I don’t. I never have and I never will. But I can. We all can.”

Superman-2-Super-Hearing-1
(Photo: DC Comics)

Clark says he could “leave the planet and never come back”, and even admits it gets to be a lot some days, as “the screams for help never stop.” He also says the hate and the ignorance never stops, and at times it “just breaks my heart”.

The thing is, there’s one very good reason he doesn’t just shut it all off, and that’s the wonderful part of humanity that also cares about others.

“But what a lot of people don’t get to see or hear is what I get to see or hear…what happens after the scream,” Clark says. “People help. People reach out. More times than not, a scream–and someone nearby helps before I can even lift a finger. People do their jobs. It’s stunning to see. Beautiful, really. The police, firemen, EMTs, politicians, even. Nothing is perfect, and it never will be, but…the world works.”

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(Photo: DC Comics)

It’s not everyone that springs to help, sure, but it is a significant amount, with Clark adding “not all the time, and not everyone, but billions and billions of times a day, the world works. Billions and billions! I explained it to Ollie: that’s what I get to see and hear every day. The sight and sounds of billions of people trying.”

Sounds like a pretty compelling reason to us. You can check out the spoiler images above and our full review of Superman #2 can be found here.

Superman #2 is written by Brian Michael Bendis and drawn by Joe Prado and Ivan Reis. Prado and Reis provide the issue’s cover with variant covers by David Mack and Adam Hughes. You can check out the official description below.

“The world quakes and shakes as it begins to succumb to the effects of the entire planet being moved into the lifeless realm known as the Phantom Zone. As Superman works with the World’s Greatest Heroes, an old enemy trapped in the same prison returns to stop the Man of Steel and escape.”

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Superman #2 is in comic stores now.

So what did you think of the issue? Let us know in the comments!

From: http://comicbook.com/dc/2018/08/09/superman-why-doesnt-shut-off-super-hearing/

Warner Bros. Is Finally Realizing Supergirl Should Be the Center of the DC Universe

Melissa Benoist doing the heavy lifting as Supergirl.
Image: The CW

Supergirl was a joke. Until about 15 years ago she was memorable mainly for her campy ‘80s movie and that time she died in that comics, possibly because her campy ‘80s movie was so bad. Yet as the Supergirl series continues to be popular on the CW, the DC movieverse’s Superman is in limbo, and a new Supergirl film is beginning to take shape, it seems like Warner Bros. is finally picking up on the fact that Supergirl, not Superman, best embodies the 80-plus years of Super mythos.

And it’s about damn time.

The Super mythos is pretty succinct at its core—a refugee comes to Earth from another planet, integrates, falls in love (with the planet and the people), and becomes Earth’s most stalwart citizen. For decades, the premiere Super has been Superman. The fable of a child cast away to avoid destruction and growing up to defend his adopted homeland was fine Americana and usually resulted in some great yarns.

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I’ve said it before, but it bears repeating—the best Superman stories are the ones that acknowledge and expand upon his experience as an immigrant. The U.S. is a country made of immigrants (political attempts at historical revisionism aside), and one of the reasons Superman has frequently felt like such an American character is because he has that experience. Like Superman, many of us wrestle with reconciling two upbringings. We struggle with long legacies of families who seem frankly alien to our own experiences. Superman realizes his heritage is both a family of farmers in Kansas and an alien language he cannot speak with a culture he cannot understand. That resonates with people!

Yet Superman’s experience as an immigrant who falls in love with an adopted homeland and chooses to protect it (often from all those Kryptonians who are supposed to have died and clearly did not) is a different one from the immigrant experience most of my friends and family know. They come here not as babies, but as children and adults who must assimilate.

Superman: The Man of Steel #19 by Jon Bogdanove and Dennis Janke
Image: DC Comics (DC Comics)

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And for them, Supergirl might be a more appealing figure—particularly after Jeph Loeb and Michael Turner radically transformed the DC Comics character in 2004. From 1959 to 1986, Kara Zor-El was Superman’s cousin who was raised on a barely surviving piece of Krypton flung away during its destruction. Owing to the nature of storytelling at DC, pre-1986 Kara was a fickle figure with no consistent characterization and a deeply convoluted history.

That didn’t improve after she was killed off in the 1986 Crisis on Infinite Earths storyline, because DC then tried to create a new character capitalizing on the surprisingly large fandom that still found her appealing. First came Matrix, who was legitimately a pile of sentient goo that would have definitely bonded with Deep Space Nine’s Odo. Then, when that didn’t work out (she was in love with a hairy Lex Luthor from an alternate universe) she merged with a human woman, became an angel, and moved to a pre-Crisis Earth to have a kid with Superman (gross) and try to save a pre-Crisis Kara. Matrix failed and essentially fled the universe because she was sad that her child with Superman (again, gross!) was probably killed in the Crisis.

In 2004, partially due to the popularity of the Supergirl character introduced in Superman: The Animated Series—whose origin borrowed heavily from the pre-Crisis erashe was rebooted again, this time in Jeph Loeb and Michael Turner’s Superman/Batman series. Once again she was Superman’s cousin, but this time she was immediately allowed a degree of pathos denied her predecessors. Because this Supergirl wasn’t raised on a post-Krypton piece of Krypton, she was a survivor of the destruction, sent by her parents to raise her cousin Kal-El.

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In the new Supergirl comics, Kara has FEELINGS.
Image: Supergirl #21 — Kevin Maguire, FCO Plascencia, and Tom Napolitano (DC Comics)

Supergirl was suddenly allowed to remember what had been lost and was also immediately stuck with the failure to protect Kal-El after arriving on Earth long after he did. The Supergirl book that followed was brief and had some…not good art, but Supergirl felt like an actual character to root for and not just the girl clone of DC’s cash cow. She struggled with making friends and dealing with people who hated her for not being from the same place they were. She also had a big history that she found frustrating to try to impart to her well-meaning cousin.

Many of the beats of that story, as well as that character’s pathos and more consistent characterization, have carried over into the Supergirl stories since—from the TV series to the fantastic Injustice 2 to the comics both monthly and one-off (including her latest story that kicked off this month). Where once Supergirl was a hodgepodge, now she is a constant with an origin that can endure multiple retellings and somehow always stay the same in the best of ways.

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This new story feels more in line with the world we’re living in right now, where immigrants are demonized and where women find themselves stuck trying to claw out of the shadows of men who maybe, sometimes, don’t know as much. DC and Warner Brothers repeatedly struggle to reboot Superman. They’re on film franchise attempt number four, with at least five other failed attempts in the last 30 years, and Brian Michael Bendis has been so flummoxed by the character in comics he decided to send his family—including Supergirl—off to parts unknown to try and understand him.

Supergirl, meanwhile, has actually been pretty successful! Apart from that one film in the ‘80s, she’s been central to the CW’s Arrowverse and the Injustice-universe and is primed to take the DCEU by storm. It only feels right that she gradually take her cousin’s place in DC’s Trinity. Maybe not officially in comics—but at least in the public’s eye, and in movies and TV too. Superman’s cousin from Argos is finally supplanting him as the Super that matters, and that’s wonderful.

From: https://io9.gizmodo.com/warner-bros-is-finally-realizing-supergirl-should-be-t-1828180796

‘The Death of Superman’ Blu-ray Review: DC’s Shining Symbol of Hope Never Looked So Good

death-of-superman-review

The Death of Superman is a story that’s almost as well-known as the title superhero’s origin story itself. DC Comics fans saw it play out in the pages of an epic crossover event in the early 90s, followed by a multitude of adaptations that included novelizations, video games, and multiple movie treatments. While the clash of titans that was the battle between Superman and Doomsday played out in live action in Batman v Superman, a better treatment of this classic tale can be found in the 2007 animated movie Superman: Doomsday, a title that kicked off the DC Universe Animated Original Movies line that continues to this day. The latest in that line, The Death of Superman, is a better adaptation of that story, still.

In the new, action-packed, animated movie, available now on home video, The Man of Steel meets his ultimate match when Doomsday comes to Earth, hell bent on destroying everything and everyone in his path, including the Justice League. The Death of Superman ultimately finds Superman in a fight to the finish when the Man of Steel becomes the only hero who can stand in the way of the monstrous creature and his unstoppable rampage of destruction. While this version of the story takes some liberties with the original tale and puts a lot of emphasis on humanizing not just Superman but the other members of the Justice League, it’s hands down the best knockdown, drag-out fight between the titans since the comic book arc. And perhaps best of all, this solid adaptation is but Part One of a highly anticipated two-part series that will close out with the rarely adapted Reign of the Supermen storyline.

The all-star cast is led by Jerry O’Connell, Rebecca Romijn and Rainn Wilson as the voices of Superman, Lois Lane and Lex Luthor, respectively. The potent trio is joined by the DC Universe Movies’ veteran returning voices of the Justice League: Jason O’Mara as Batman, Rosario Dawson as Wonder Woman, Shemar Moore as Cyborg, Nathan Fillion as Green Lantern/Hal Jordan, Matt Lanter as Aquaman, and Christopher Gorham as The Flash.

Before we get further into the review, here’s a new bonus clip:

Feature:

The Death of Superman had a tough task ahead of it: How do you faithfully adapt a well-known story using iconic characters that everyone knows, while also setting up the sequel, but make it fresh and new enough to feel interesting without diverging too far from DC Comics’ history and core concepts? The production team found a clever way to do just that. While the narrative may take some liberties with the original story, the stunning visuals are pulled from the many pages of the “Doomsday” arc and, at times, go above and beyond them. Kudos to the Warner Bros. Animation and Studio Mir teams for delivering a thrilling chapter in a long-running story.

Admittedly, the first half of The Death of Superman drags a bit narratively because the focus here is to show just what Superman means to the people of Metropolis. He’s a personal hero to many citizens there, folks like Bibbo Bibbowski, John Henry Irons, and Hank Henshaw. (And the comics aficionados out there should recognize those names.) He’s a looming threat to villains like Bruno Mannheim and his Intergang goons, and a thorn in the side of the ever-villainous Lex Luthor. Much of the dialogue, exposition, and even early plot points are dedicated to humanizing Superman, the better to feel the pain of his passing once the inevitable battle occurs.

death-of-superman-review

Image via Warner Bros. Home Entertainment

But there’s a lot of action to enjoy even before the big bad arrives. Superman deals with low-level villains with ease, which offers up an example of his power level and contrasts nicely with just how much he–and the rest of the League–struggle against Doomsday. There’s also the disastrous mission of the Space Shuttle Excalibur, an event that pays homage to the original “Fantastic Four” origin story in the pages of Marvel Comics, but also twists that narrative quite a bit in DC’s version; The Death of Superman uses it more as a way to establish Superman’s sometimes obsessive fandom and to tease the Reign of the Supermen. We even get to see a Superman/Wonder Woman team-up to take on Cheetah and Metallo, though the reason they’re fighting is cleverly explained plot-wise. So while the humanizing of Superman slows things down a bit, these early bouts before the prize fight keep the energy up.

And then Doomsday arrives. The monster bent only on fighting and winning systematically tears through other members of the League, starting with Atlantis’ undersea kingdom. Other than a brief aside that sees Doomsday doing his best 80s slasher movie villain impression, it’s not long before the members of the League are all dispatched, even the powerful Wonder Woman. This is where the promise of the movie’s title kicks in and things get ramped up right up until the end. It’s a thrilling battle that demands to be seen because it’s unlike any other adaptation of this story we’ve seen before.

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Image via Warner Bros. Home Entertainment

The Death of Superman does fall back onto old familiar tropes in the DC Comics universe from time to time, and it’s a shame that the narrative side of things doesn’t feel the need to freshen itself up for the modern era, but since fans will seek this title out for the final battle itself, I can confidently say that it delivers. It feels like the culmination of decades’ worth of writers’ and artists’ wishes about what they would like to see in a fight between Superman and Doomsday, and now they get to bring it to life (and death) on the screen with cutting-edge animation. It’s brutal, it’s visceral, it’s kinetic and, oddly enough, believable, because as far beyond mortal men as Superman is, Doomsday is his equal, and this is a no-holds-barred street fight with no time to rest and recover. The movie’s PG-13 rating both pushes the limits and, conversely, sometimes masks the fight’s most gruesome moments, but it works well enough for the tale. And despite the familiarity of it, the story’s emotional ending never loses its gut-punch potential, especially because The Death of Superman lays down so much groundwork to show just what Superman means to people and how willing he is to defend their lives, even if it ultimately means his death.

But the story isn’t quite over. I can’t wait to see how Reign of the Supermen picks up from here, and luckily the movie’s four (!) end credits scenes offer up a solid tease. This one’s definitely worth the buy!

Special Features:

A Sneak Peek at DC Universe’s Next Animated Movie, Reign of the Supermen (~10 minutes):

  • DC Entertainment Creative Animation Director Mike Carlin, screenwriter Jim Krieg, screenwriter Tim Sheridan, Warner Home Video manager Jeff Brown, director Sam Liu, actors Cameron Monaghan, Cress Williams, Jerry O’Connell, Rebecca Romijn, Rainn Wilson, and voice director Wes Gleason talk about and tease sneak-peeks at the upcoming movie.
  • The beginning of the next movie immediately introduces the four replacement Supermen, along with questions as to which of them may be the real one, if any. The creative team breaks down their versions of the four “fake” Superman stand-ins as they’ll appear in this follow-up film–Super Boy, Cyborg Superman, Eradicator, and Steel–a first for the iconic title. There are a lot of behind-the-scenes looks here, not only of the cast but of the artwork from the original comics, concept art, character drawings for this new version, and plenty of clips from the upcoming film.

death-of-superman-doomsday

Image via Warner Bros. Home Entertainment

The Brawl That Topped Them All (~15 minutes):

  • The four-issue battle between Superman and Doomsday is discussed by Carlin, artist Jon Bogdanove, co director Jake Castorena, martial arts expert/consultant Christian Medina.
  • Carlin reveals the Doomsday character’s name origin, coupled with Dan Jurgens’ original drawings and designs. Their thought was that the character needed to be big, terrifying–a personification of death, like the hand of fate–and not part of the usual rogues gallery.
  • They compare the fight to a championship bout between heavyweights. Medina brings his improvisational fighting techniques, use of items in the environment, and his expertise in Krav Maga to bear as influences on the look of the fight. The result is a tremendous action sequence.
  • There’s a cool revisit to the history and rollout of the comics themselves. The battle literally got bigger, more intense, and more quickly paced as it went on, going from four-panel pages, to three, two, and ultimately one; the iconic climax was basically an issue of splash pages full of unforgettable scenes, moments, and visuals. Carlin makes the point that it was a real collaboration among 10 comic book artists who shored up each others’ strengths and weaknesses throughout the run, a real rarity in the industry.

From the DC Comics Vault: Legion of Superheroes Season 2, “Dark Victory: Part 1? and “Dark Victory: Part 2? – Catch this two-part animated series tie-in from the mid-2000s series’ finale.

Miscellaneous: 

death-of-superman-lex-luthor

Image via Warner Bros. Home Entertainment

Bibbo Bibbowski gets a good amount of screen time in this one, though he doesn’t get to shoot Doomsday with a laser cannon, unfortunately.

Steve Lombard gets a namedrop and cameo. Other namedrops include Pete Ross and Lori Lamaris. If you knew that the latter was a mermaid, then Ma Kent’s comment about “serving halibut” makes a little more sense.

Alfred Pennyworth, Damian Wayne, and even Bruce’s Great Dane Titus get a cameo near the movie’s end.

The town Doomsday is stomping through, Carlin Heights, is named after Mike Carlin, editor of the original comic book crossover arc and current Director of Animation for DC Entertainment.

the-death-of-superman-bluray

the-death-of-superman-4k

Image via Warner Bros. Home Entertainment

death-of-superman-bluray-gift-set

Image via Warner Bros. Home Entertainment

From: http://collider.com/death-of-superman-bluray-review/

Action Comics Reveals How Organized Crime Works In Superman’s City

SPOILER WARNING: The following article contains major spoilers for Action Comics #1001 by Brian Michael Bendis, Patrick Gleason, Alejandro Sanchez and Josh Reed, on sale now.


How does a city like Metropolis even have crime? Sure there’s your Luthors, your Parasites, your Toymen and Pranksters, but regular man-on-the-street crime? You’d think they’d all move to Gotham or Bludhaven or something. That’s not the case, however, as Metropolis has, and will always have, a thriving criminal underworld, usually in the form of Intergang; Darkseid’s own personal mafia who flood Metropolis with Apokoliptian technology capable of stopping even Superman in his tracks.

However, this week’s issue of Action Comics — Brian Michael Bendis’ first full issue on the iconic title — gives us our first look at the so-called invisible mafia operating in Superman’s home, right under his nose. The issue introduces us to the people responsible for committing crimes under the Man of Steel’s nose, how they get away with it, the man responsible for running the Metropolis crime families, what they have planned next and their secret weapon; a new villain capable of going toe-to-toe with Superman himself.

Invisible Mafia

Before the issue gets around to showing how the criminals of Metropolis operate, it sets a standard by following some of the criminals who aren’t doing things the smart way via a group of armed robbers attempting to steal a safe from Lex Luthor’s tower. The scene allows Bendis to have a little fun with Superman and the robbers, but also highlights the ridiculousness of trying to stop Superman. One of the crooks chides his cohort for resorting to gunfire and seems more embarrassed than anything else that his cousin would even attempt to stop the Man of Steel with such conventional means.

RELATED: Superman Taps Into His Inner-Batman in Action Comics #1001

On the other hand, later in the issue, we see that there’s a dedicated network of criminals with sophisticated means to keep track of Superman and operate a complex organized crime cabal right under his nose. A man named Whisper surveils Superman at all times, allowing the criminals to keep track of where Superman is in relation to Metropolis with a giant bank of monitors that would make Batman or Ozymandias jealous. This menagerie of monitors allowing him to inform his bosses where in the world Superman is and when it’s safe for them to meet, plan and commit crimes.

Overseen by a crime boss by the name of Mister Strong, the criminal leaders of Metropolis meet at his mansion inside a giant lead tube completely imperceptible to Superman’s super-senses. There seems to be five underbosses, although we only get the names of two — Lettuce and Yogurt. Yogurt has been busy setting fires to keep Superman distracted. He’s also the one who floated Superman’s name as a potential suspect, compromising the hero’s relationship and involvement with the investigation.

However, the rest of the group isn’t happy with Yogurt’s plan, which is far less sophisticated and high-tech than the rest of the operation’s usual methods to evade Superman. The crook meets his fate as a cloud of red gas appears from nowhere and suffocates Yogurt from the inside out, shocking his fellow underbosses and sending a message to them that doing anything which might put them on Superman’s radar is an instant death sentence. That’s because the red gas isn’t just deadly — it’s sentient and the newest member of their crew.

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From: https://www.cbr.com/action-comics-organized-crime-superman/

Action Comics Focuses on the Crime Even Superman Can’t See – CBR

SPOILER WARNING: The following article contains major spoilers for Action Comics #1001 by Brian Michael Bendis, Patrick Gleason, Alejandro Sanchez and Josh Reed, on sale now.


How does a city like Metropolis even have crime? Sure there’s your Luthors, your Parasites, your Toymen and Pranksters, but regular man-on-the-street crime? You’d think they’d all move to Gotham or Bludhaven or something. That’s not the case, however, as Metropolis has, and will always have, a thriving criminal underworld, usually in the form of Intergang; Darkseid’s own personal mafia who flood Metropolis with Apokoliptian technology capable of stopping even Superman in his tracks.

However, this week’s issue of Action Comics — Brian Michael Bendis’ first full issue on the iconic title — gives us our first look at the so-called invisible mafia operating in Superman’s home, right under his nose. The issue introduces us to the people responsible for committing crimes under the Man of Steel’s nose, how they get away with it, the man responsible for running the Metropolis crime families, what they have planned next and their secret weapon; a new villain capable of going toe-to-toe with Superman himself.

Invisible Mafia

Before the issue gets around to showing how the criminals of Metropolis operate, it sets a standard by following some of the criminals who aren’t doing things the smart way via a group of armed robbers attempting to steal a safe from Lex Luthor’s tower. The scene allows Bendis to have a little fun with Superman and the robbers, but also highlights the ridiculousness of trying to stop Superman. One of the crooks chides his cohort for resorting to gunfire and seems more embarrassed than anything else that his cousin would even attempt to stop the Man of Steel with such conventional means.

RELATED: Superman Taps Into His Inner-Batman in Action Comics #1001

On the other hand, later in the issue, we see that there’s a dedicated network of criminals with sophisticated means to keep track of Superman and operate a complex organized crime cabal right under his nose. A man named Whisper surveils Superman at all times, allowing the criminals to keep track of where Superman is in relation to Metropolis with a giant bank of monitors that would make Batman or Ozymandias jealous. This menagerie of monitors allowing him to inform his bosses where in the world Superman is and when it’s safe for them to meet, plan and commit crimes.

Overseen by a crime boss by the name of Mister Strong, the criminal leaders of Metropolis meet at his mansion inside a giant lead tube completely imperceptible to Superman’s super-senses. There seems to be five underbosses, although we only get the names of two — Lettuce and Yogurt. Yogurt has been busy setting fires to keep Superman distracted. He’s also the one who floated Superman’s name as a potential suspect, compromising the hero’s relationship and involvement with the investigation.

However, the rest of the group isn’t happy with Yogurt’s plan, which is far less sophisticated and high-tech than the rest of the operation’s usual methods to evade Superman. The crook meets his fate as a cloud of red gas appears from nowhere and suffocates Yogurt from the inside out, shocking his fellow underbosses and sending a message to them that doing anything which might put them on Superman’s radar is an instant death sentence. That’s because the red gas isn’t just deadly — it’s sentient and the newest member of their crew.

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From: https://www.cbr.com/action-comics-organized-crime-superman/

Digital Comics Sale: What’s Worth Getting in the “Death of Superman” Sale (Which Might Not Involve Superman Dying)

There’s a “Death of Superman” digital sale going on.  It’s an odd thing that doesn’t seem to be totally Death of Superman related, but I suppose they’re trying to tie it into the current Death of Superman comic.  You can’t kill a character off too many times, apparently.  Here are a few things worth having a look at, not all of which are as morbid as the sale’s name:

All-Star Superman by Grant Morrison and Frank Quitely is probably the best Superman comic of the last 20 years.  A series that’s a love letter to the early Silver Age Superman comics.

If you’d like to read a longer, coherent, run of Superman comics, I’d say the Superman: Man of Steel reprint series of the 80s run is probably your best best.  New 52 Superman was a mess and while elements of Rebirth Superman titles offered here are decent, there’s the whole “where did which Superman come from” problem and the less said about the Oz storyline, the better.

 

The ’90s Superman Adventures is an oddity.  It’s based out of the TV cartoon of the day, but it’s written by the likes of Paul Dini, Scott McCloud and Mark Millar.

Emperor Joker is departure from the majority of Superman stories.  To avoid spoilers, we’ll call it “what if the Joker had a Cosmic Cube and reshaped the universe?”  It’s dark and odd, but interesting.

If you’re looking for the high page count volumes in this sale, those would be the Superman: The Golden Age and World’s Finest: The Silver Age  volumes.

Todd Allen wears a lot of hats. At various times he’s been (alphabetically), a bouncer, college professor, humor columnist, Internet producer and an NBA/WNBA Beat Writer, among other things. He’s the author of Economics of Digital Comics. You should probably read it.

From: http://www.comicsbeat.com/digital-comics-sale-whats-worth-getting-in-the-death-of-superman-sale-which-might-not-involve-superman-dying/

The new Aquaman will be more Wonder Woman than Superman

One of the most surprising reveals of San Diego Comic-Con 2018 was that Kelly Sue DeConnick will be tackling a new Aquaman story for DC Comics. Granted, that was at least partially because DC Comics co-publisher Dan DiDio wasn’t supposed to have mentioned it at the company’s traditional Thursday morning press event.

But the fish is out of the net: DeConnick, who famously relaunched Carol Danvers as Captain Marvel and co-created the women-in-prison-exploitation-film-subverting comic Bitch Planet, will be taking over the Aquaman series soon — so when I sat down with DeConnick this week, I had to ask: Why Aquaman?

Not to diminish the hero, of course — I’m a firm believer that there’s no such thing as a dumb character — but when one has been the butt of as many Justice League jokes as Aquaman, you have to ask.

DeConnick told me that that was part of the attraction to tackling a book described by DC’s chief creative officer, Jim Lee, as a Batman: Year One for the Atlantean.

“Aquaman is this character where … he is part of the Justice League, so he’s one of the big seven, right? But he’s also kinda considered second-tier. So he’s a little bit under the radar and I think that that makes him an underdog to start with, which is a place I really like to work from.”

It also doesn’t hurt that the current, most visible depiction of Aquaman comes in the form of Jason Momoa and every single one of his well-tanned mussels muscles. But DeConnick wants to stress she’s not writing Momoa’s Aquaman.

“I’m writing my Aquaman. I’ve done my research, and I don’t want to scare anyone: This is not a reboot! We’re not even renumbering! But there was something about the kind of Momoa twinkle in the eye, the little bit of a swagger. I find that really appealing. And then there’s something really visceral about water and primal about the ocean, and I got really interested in that.”

Taking an interest in a character is one thing, but crafting your own unique approach is another. DeConnick didn’t want to give too many details, naturally, but she could talk about her process, and finding her own take on Arthur Curry, superhero and half-human heir to the throne of the lost city of Atlantis.

“The question I always ask when I’m approaching any character is Where does their pain come from? What is their core wound, and how is that played out in their power set? Can you connect their wound to their gift? and How is it played out in their personality? And then What kinds of conflicts does that suggest?”


The cover of Aquaman #1, DC Comics (2011).

The cover of Geoff Johns and Ivan Reis’ Aquaman #1.
Ivan Reis, Rod Reis/DC Comics

She looked at a lot of the traditional themes of the best Aquaman arcs, particularly Geoff Johns’ New 52-era Aquaman ongoing series, which built the canonical foundation for DC’s current version of Aquaman.

“Based on the work that Geoff did,” DeConnick said, “I have a different idea for what the core wound is for Arthur, that I want to play from.”

“The approach for Aquaman has always been that he is essentially mixed race, right? He’s half-Atlantean and half-human, so he doesn’t belong in either place, and the idea is [that] each place rejects him for that. But my feeling is that in contemporary society we cannot play the beautiful, literally bulletproof white boy off as facing bias because of his mixed parentage. I think that is disingenuous at best and, I don’t know, cruel at worst. So, I was like Alright, well, what else have we got to work with?”

Her Aquaman will move the conflicted king closer to Wonder Woman than Superman.

“There’s these different iconic models that we work with in superheroes and he’s always been the alien model, right? Like Superman, [Aquaman] is not of this world. […] I wanted to shift him from that to more of a mythological grounding. More like … Wonder Woman or Thor would be myth-based characters, as opposed to the alien model. So that’s the other shift that I’m making. But it isn’t like I’m rewriting his history. It’s rather sort of a tonal shift or an approach shift. I don’t want to scare anyone. Really, I’m not scary and very nice!”

Many details on DeConnick’s Aquaman run remain to be announced, including the artist and release date, but based on upcoming runs, it’s unlikely to hit shelves until early 2019.

From: https://www.polygon.com/comics/2018/8/3/17645482/aquaman-dc-comics-kelly-sue-deconnick

The new Aquaman will be more Wonder Woman than Superman

One of the most surprising reveals of San Diego Comic-Con 2018 was that Kelly Sue DeConnick will be tackling a new Aquaman story for DC Comics. Granted, that was at least partially because DC Comics co-publisher Dan DiDio wasn’t supposed to have mentioned it at the company’s traditional Thursday morning press event.

But the fish is out of the net: DeConnick, who famously relaunched Carol Danvers as Captain Marvel and co-created the women-in-prison-exploitation-film-subverting comic Bitch Planet, will be taking over the Aquaman series soon — so when I sat down with DeConnick this week, I had to ask: Why Aquaman?

Not to diminish the hero, of course — I’m a firm believer that there’s no such thing as a dumb character — but when one has been the butt of as many Justice League jokes as Aquaman, you have to ask.

DeConnick told me that that was part of the attraction to tackling a book described by DC’s chief creative officer, Jim Lee, as a Batman: Year One for the Atlantean.

“Aquaman is this character where … he is part of the Justice League, so he’s one of the big seven, right? But he’s also kinda considered second-tier. So he’s a little bit under the radar and I think that that makes him an underdog to start with, which is a place I really like to work from.”

It also doesn’t hurt that the current, most visible depiction of Aquaman comes in the form of Jason Momoa and every single one of his well-tanned mussels muscles. But DeConnick wants to stress she’s not writing Momoa’s Aquaman.

“I’m writing my Aquaman. I’ve done my research, and I don’t want to scare anyone: This is not a reboot! We’re not even renumbering! But there was something about the kind of Momoa twinkle in the eye, the little bit of a swagger. I find that really appealing. And then there’s something really visceral about water and primal about the ocean, and I got really interested in that.”

Taking an interest in a character is one thing, but crafting your own unique approach is another. DeConnick didn’t want to give too many details, naturally, but she could talk about her process, and finding her own take on Arthur Curry, superhero and half-human heir to the throne of the lost city of Atlantis.

“The question I always ask when I’m approaching any character is Where does their pain come from? What is their core wound, and how is that played out in their power set? Can you connect their wound to their gift? and How is it played out in their personality? And then What kinds of conflicts does that suggest?”


The cover of Aquaman #1, DC Comics (2011).

The cover of Geoff Johns and Ivan Reis’ Aquaman #1.
Ivan Reis, Rod Reis/DC Comics

She looked at a lot of the traditional themes of the best Aquaman arcs, particularly Geoff Johns’ New 52-era Aquaman ongoing series, which built the canonical foundation for DC’s current version of Aquaman.

“Based on the work that Geoff did,” DeConnick said, “I have a different idea for what the core wound is for Arthur, that I want to play from.”

“The approach for Aquaman has always been that he is essentially mixed race, right? He’s half-Atlantean and half-human, so he doesn’t belong in either place, and the idea is [that] each place rejects him for that. But my feeling is that in contemporary society we cannot play the beautiful, literally bulletproof white boy off as facing bias because of his mixed parentage. I think that is disingenuous at best and, I don’t know, cruel at worst. So, I was like Alright, well, what else have we got to work with?”

Her Aquaman will move the conflicted king closer to Wonder Woman than Superman.

“There’s these different iconic models that we work with in superheroes and he’s always been the alien model, right? Like Superman, [Aquaman] is not of this world. […] I wanted to shift him from that to more of a mythological grounding. More like … Wonder Woman or Thor would be myth-based characters, as opposed to the alien model. So that’s the other shift that I’m making. But it isn’t like I’m rewriting his history. It’s rather sort of a tonal shift or an approach shift. I don’t want to scare anyone. Really, I’m not scary and very nice!”

Many details on DeConnick’s Aquaman run remain to be announced, including the artist and release date, but based on upcoming runs, it’s unlikely to hit shelves until early 2019.

From: https://www.polygon.com/comics/2018/8/3/17645482/aquaman-dc-comics-kelly-sue-deconnick

Green Lanterns, Superman, Booster Gold, and What’s Next for Dan Jurgens

Dan Jurgens is often remembered as one of the men who killed Superman, but he’s also someone who gave the Man of Steel as much life as any number of legendary creators. Jurgens’ time with Superman spans nearly 30 years, and his work at DC Comics has allowed him to play with nearly every major character and concept over the decades.

Incredibly accomplished as both a writer and artist, Jurgens just finished his latest run with Superman, wrapping up his time as writer on Action Comics, and writing and drawing the lead story for Action Comics #1000. He’s currently writing Green Lanterns, his first time on a proper Green Lantern book, despite having made his mark on that world (albeit indirectly) back in 1993. 

And while stuff like Superman and Green Lantern are the marquee names, comic book fans also know Jurgens as the creator of Booster Gold, the beloved time-traveling screw-up whose antics often feel like the inspiration for the Legends of Tomorrow TV series. We sat down with Mr. Jurgens at SDCC to talk about what he’s been up to recently…

Den of Geek: So, you just kicked off an arc on Green Lanterns, let’s talk about that.

Dan Jurgens: I’m doing Green Lanterns now, along with Mike Perkins, who has just come over to DC from Marvel. Mike and I have wanted to work together for a long time, and he’s doing absolutely fabulous stuff on it, and it is so much fun to see his interpretations of the entire Green Lantern Corps. I keep throwing more stuff at him, saying, “Draw this character, draw that character,” and he’s doing a great job with it.

What we have done, is introduce a mystery into the Green Lantern Corps, where by the end of our first issue, which is number 50, one of the Guardians is dead, and it starts to look like a murder mystery, with different Lantern characters being pegged as the murderers. So, it’s very much a story about the Corps, it’s about mistrust, it’s about whether or not you can trust each other, and whether or not you can even touch these cool rings that they wear, which is what makes them the Green Lantern. So, we’re having a lot of different things we’re playing things we’re playing with in this that make it, I think, somewhat different then the typical Green Lantern type of story.

And how long is this arc running for?

We’re running from issue 50 to 57, eight issues, and when you have that many characters as we do there, and I want to touch on the entire Corps, certainly with focus on Simon Baz, and Jessica Cruz, ’cause they were sort of the cornerstone characters. But we’re using Kilowog, and we’re using Guy Gardner, and we’re using Hal, so we have a lot we want to touch on.

Is this the first time you’ve written any of the Green Lanterns outside of guest appearances in other the books?

Well, and that’s what’s really weird, because it is the first time I’ve done it directly, and the funny thing is that if we go back to Death of Superman days, when we destroyed Coast City, that’s kind what drove Hal off the edge, and turned into the Parallax stuff, which I also did in Zero Hour. I’ve had this relationship with Green Lantern for a long time, but never have done it directly. So, yeah, this is the first time.

I can’t stay away from your Superman work, because it’s just such tremendous body of work that I’ve come back to again and again as a fan. What is your proudest moment as a Superman writer, artist, and creator?

I think it’s really hard to beat Superman #75, and the whole Death of Superman thing, because that was so unique for its time, and these days it’s really almost impossible for those who weren’t there, to try and tell them what it was like in terms of the public reaction to it overall. So, that’s a part of it, but I think also, and not to cheat, because this will sound like a bit of a cheat, is just to have had that long of an affiliation with a character, and continue to be able to add things that contribute overall to the old tapestry that is Superman.

And, through that time, you’ve been a writer, you’ve been an artist, you’ve been a writer and artist. Were there any particular collaborations that you felt where you were really firing on all cylinders with people?

Yeah, well, and I think if we go back to what we were during The Death of Superman, there were four Superman books, and we were essentially a weekly comic book. And, it was a group of writers, it was me, along with Jerry Ordway, and Louise Simonson, and Roger Stern, as well as artists like Jerry was drawing his book, and we had Tom Grummett, and John Bogdanove, and all together it was a very special time for what Superman was, so there was that.

I mean, even more recently, I was so fortunate to have really good artists on the book. Patrick Zircher kinda helped us kick it off with Action Comics #957, because we were doing the Rebirth stuff and everything, and from that all the way on up through, I think I was really fortunate to have really nice, solid artists, each of whom brought something special to Superman.

Do you ever see yourself drawing a monthly again?

Yeah, I do. I think, more and more, I keep telling myself that I’m gonna have to do it again, because one of the realities is, even as I draw more sporadically now. For example I just did the story in Action Comics #1000, that I wrote and drew. And when I got done with that I said, “This was fun to get back and do this, I have to draw more,” so at some point I’m gonna have to do it here.

Do you feel now that your Superman story is complete? You wrapped things up at the end of your Rebirth run, but do you feel like you’ve told that story now? Or do you still feel that you have more stories to tell with Superman?

I think the answer to both of those is yes. I think I told that story and brought it to the conclusion I wanted it to have, but I think that there are more stories out there, and whether or not we’ll ever get around to doing it, who knows, we’ll see. But I think there are always more stories out there.

Superman is such a tremendous character, and what I like about him is that he is so elastic a character, and by that I mean you really can tell a story as small as, it’s his son Jon’s birthday, and Lois is out working on a story and he’s fighting Brainiac or somebody, and poor Jon is sitting there home alone. You can tell a story that is as small as a family moment, and at the same time, tell a story as big as Superman fighting the biggest cosmic threat there is, and that’s what I like about the character.

You are also known as the creator of the creator of Booster Gold, and Booster has been absent from the DC Universe the last couple of years until that story that came towards the end of your run on Action Comics. What was it like revisiting Booster yet again, and are we ever going to see him again, or see you working on him again?

Well, it’s always fun to work on Booster Gold, and it’s sort of like he comes up for a while, then he fades and comes back. Working on him in Action was a lot of fun. Watching Tom King use him in Batman was a lot of fun, and obviously Tom is using him in a new series that’s coming up, called Heroes in Crisis. And, after that we’ll see. Booster is, I think, this fun jovial character who is very complicated on one level, and at the same time very direct. In comics we have characters with secret identities, and all sorts of secrets they try and protect. Booster just wears it on his sleeve, and it’s all out there for everybody to see, both the good and the bad, and he has plenty of faults. I think that’s what makes it fun to work on Booster Gold, so yeah, hopefully out there we’ll see something.

And you’ve been involved with DC’s initiative to get comics out into the hands of casual fans again, with their work with Walmart.

We have four titles that are going into Walmart on a monthly basis, Batman, Superman, Justice League, and Teen Titans. I am writing the Teen Titans lead story. Each of those books are a hundred pages, and they have one new story in the front. I’m writing a Teen Titans story with great art by Scot Eaton, and right now the Titans are in this bit of a renaissance, and even that’s hard to say, because it’s not like the Titans ever really went away. But we have the Teen Titans Go! movie, and there’s a Titans live action TV series that is coming here this fall, and so to kind of be out there in that different sort of venue trying to find a new reader, and kind of find those casual readers so that we can later entice them into a comic book store, it’s a lot of fun.

What do you think it would take to really get Superman to work on the big screen again?

I think they’re very close to it. I think they have the right cast, and I think at the end of the Justice League movie, we really started to see the keys of what could make it work. We saw the Superman/Flash race, which is such a quintessential Superman moment, the color was brighter, the sun was out, it was outdoors, it was positive. We saw Superman smile, we saw Superman have sort of that command presence that I think he has to have, which I think Henry Cavill really embodies. So I think it’s very close.

Green Lanterns arrives every other Wednesday from DC Comics.

From: http://www.denofgeek.com/us/books/dc-entertainment/275250/green-lanterns-superman-booster-gold-and-whats-next-for-dan-jurgens

DC Returns to The Death of Superman in New Comic

One of DC’s biggest stories is coming back to the comic book page, with a fresh creative a team and a much different angle than what we previously knew.

Today, DC Comics has announced that a new digital-first comic series titled The Death of Superman will be released as a tie-in to the animated movie of the same title. In fact, the announcement was made at the same time as the first chapter of the comic was made available for download online. Written by fan-favorite scribe Louise Simonson and illustrated by Cat Staggs, Joel Ojeda, Laura Braga and more, the digital comic is a 12-part series that will unfold weekly.

RELATED: REVIEW: Animated Death of Superman Film is A Worthy Adaptation of a ’90s Classic

The Death of Superman: Part 1 is meant to be a prequel of sorts to the animated film The Death of Superman, which was already released digitally last week. The events that unfold in the comic take place hours before Superman’s fateful battle with the raging monster known as Doomsday. Some of the chapters are said to follow the heroic feats of Superman prior to the confrontation, while subsequent stories will examine what Jimmy Olsen was up to during that time, or deal with the fallout of the death of a major hero.

“These are never-before-told stories of what happened before, during, and after the conflict with Doomsday that cost Superman his life,” the writer of the series, Louise Simonson, said. “Each story will explore what power means—for someone like Superman who wields it for the good of humanity, or the villains who use it to further their own selfish agendas.”

The original Death of Superman comic book was one of the most important in the history of DC Comics’ publishing. The loss of the character made national news, and it established a path for an equally epic story that unfolded in the Superman comics the following year with “The Reign of the Supermen” — a storyline that is set to be turned into an animated movie in 2019.

RELATED: Reign of the Supermen Trailer Breaks Down the Man of Steel’s Successors

The first chapter of The Death of Superman digital comic series, written by Louise Simonson and illustrated by Cat Staggs, with colors by Wendy Broome, lettering by Carlos M. Mangual and cover by Jerry Ordway and Wendy Broome, is availble for download now. The Death of Superman animated movie was released digitally on July 24. The film will be available on Ultra HD 4K Blu-ray Combo Pack, Blu-ray Combo Pack and DVD August 7.

From: https://www.cbr.com/death-of-superman-digital-comic-prequel/

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