‘Supergirl’ is back. But why is Superman on the show, too?


Tyler Hoechlin stars as super-cousin Clark Kent/Superman on the season two premiere of “Supergirl” on the CW. (The CW).

For the second time in a year, the Girl of Steel has had to find a new home.

After being rocketed to Earth from Krypton in last year’s first season on CBS, “Supergirl” now finds itself in a new world where superhero television shows are a lot more common: The CW.

Despite sparks toward the end of last season, don’t expect any romance right away from Supergirl (Melissa Benoist) and James “don’t call me Jimmy” Olsen (Mehcad Brooks). Mutual feelings are obvious, but Kara Danvers/Supergirl is leaning toward being a little more independent this season, wanting to concentrate on her life behind a pair of glasses and her career at a news organization. More than likely, the writers on the show are realizing that superheroes falling in love quickly doesn’t always make great television (see “Arrow” and Olicity) while taking the slow approach to super-love has done wonders for another CW superhero hit (see “The Flash“).

Cat Grant (Calista Flockhart) is still around, continuing an on-screen tradition of unrealistically mean and grouchy heads of news organizations that no one would work for in real life. She’s part “Devil Wears Prada,” part Huffington Post with a dash of TMZ. What she remains is “Supergirl’s” comic relief. Her funniest line last season on CBS, when she declared her staff to be an “attractive, nonthreatening, racially diverse cast of a CW show,” has come to life.

There is one slight major change this season on “Supergirl”: Superman is here.

Tyler Hoechlin made his debut in the “Supergirl” Season 2 premiere and gives a surprisingly enjoyable performance as both Superman and Clark Kent.

Considering how consistently moody (and dead) our big-screen movie Superman, Henry Cavill, has been as we get closer to a “Justice League” movie, Hoechlin’s Superman is something we haven’t seen in live-action since Dean Cain — a Superman smiling on the job, having fun and inspiring hope, not fear of being crushed by a building, as was the case with Cavill’s Superman in his battle against Zod in “Man of Steel.”

There’s some Christopher Reeve inspiration in Hoechlin’s performance and you quickly forget little annoying fanboy gripes like Hoechlin not being that tall (Brook’s Jimmy Olsen towers over him), that funny-looking cape (a rare misfire for CW superhero suits) and his teen-heartthrob frame that is a far cry from Cavill’s comic book triceps.

But why would “Supergirl” play the Superman card so soon? Especially if we know Hoechlin’s Superman is only here for the first few episodes and not sticking around all season. This is Supergirl’s show after all. Perhaps she could have been given another season of being a solo superhero before calling her cousin in. And Benoist has done a fairly good job of conveying a superpowered transformation when she takes off her glasses. She didn’t really need the help. So why is Superman here?

Supergirl gets an assist from her Kryptonian cousin, Kal-El/Superman. (Courtesy of the CW)

Here’s a theory, and it has to do with the shadowy presence of the bad guys thinking they’re doing good on “Supergirl” this season: Project Cadmus.

At the end of “Supergirl’s” season two premiere, Cadmus, a secret scientific organization, has gotten its hands on Jon Corben (Frederick Schmidt), a bad guy who unsuccessfully tries to take on Superman and Supergirl.

Cadmus will turn Corben into this season’s first major supervillain: Metallo. Metallo of course is a classic Superman villain know for having a robotic body that is fueled by Kryptonite.

Kryptonite gets a lot of mentions in “Supergirl’s” season two premiere when Superman confronts Hank Henshaw (who we know is secretly the Martian Manhunter) about his secret government organization (the one Supergirl and her adoptive sister, Alex, works for), which carries lots of the radioactive rock. Why all the extra chitchat about Kryptonite? We know it will be used to fuel Metallo, but what if this specific plot point has another intention — to make Superman bleed?

Those well-versed in Superman comics of the ’90s will remember that in his comic book adventures, Superman was cloned by Cadmus. The result? One of the most ’90s superheroes ever: Superboy. Not Clark Kent as a kid Superboy. A lab experiment Superboy, with Superman’s DNA, who was supposed to be grown to adulthood, but escapes before his “growing up” is complete. This Superboy was a hormone-fueled teen who woke up realizing he looked like and could do many of the things Superman did. It made for some very funny comics.

Could cloning Superman/creating Superboy be why Cadmus is here? Could this be why we have Superman in the first few episodes?

We already have the presence of Mon-El, who in this episode was revealed as the being inside the spacecraft that crashed to Earth in “Supergirl’s” Season 1 finale. With Mon-El, who has similar powers to Kryptonians because he’s from a planet not too far from where Krypton used to be, Supergirl will already have someone to babysit. But what if Mon-El turns bad late in the season? What if Superman is too busy to come back to help because his CW contract limits the amount of times he can save the day?

You’ve got a show with Project Cadmus, Supergirl, Superman, Kryptonite and a villain that provides the potential for spilled Kryptonian blood. Why not start some cloning experiments and give us the kid? Take a look at some of those Tom Grummett-illustrated Superboy comics from the ’90s and tell me Superboy isn’t the perfect teen hero for the CW.

It’s a long shot, but so was Superman actually appearing on this show. We’ve seen the Man of Steel. Is the Boy of Steel on the way?

Read more:

Inside the making of ‘Luke Cage,’ Marvel’s first black superhero show

From: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/comic-riffs/wp/2016/10/10/supergirl-is-back-but-why-is-superman-on-the-show-too/

Comics hero wants a Superman who faces his Jewish roots

JTA — The Jewish history of Superman is well known. Jewish writer Jerry Siegel — who co-created the iconic comic book character with Jewish illustrator Joe Shuster — once said he conceived of Superman after reading about the “slaughter of helpless, oppressed Jews” in Nazi Europe.

The character’s original name from his home planet of Krypton is Kal-El, which sounds very Hebrew (the Hebrew suffix “El,” which comes at the end of many biblical names, like Rachel or Daniel, is an ancient word for God). And in one of the earliest Superman comics, the Man of Steel fulfills a very Jewish fantasy: He captures both Hitler and Stalin and brings them to the League of Nations, where they are tried for war crimes.

More recent iterations of the Superman franchise haven’t alluded to these and other Jewish roots — but famed comic book writer Frank Miller wants to change that.

Miller, whose is known for his work on influential series such as “Sin City,” “300” and “The Dark Knight Returns,” told Inverse at New York’s Comic-Con on Friday that Superman needs to “confront his Jewish roots again.”

“He has a history in World War II, and I’d like to put him there again,” Miller said, alluding to Siegel’s origin story. “Superman needs to confront his Jewish roots, and I’d like to write that. I’d like to have him face a death camp.”

Miller is often credited with introducing the darker style and tone typical of most modern superhero narratives. His popular work on “The Dark Knight” — his characterization of Batman as a conflicted, haunted crime fighter — is typical of his bringing adult themes to the world of comic books. Miller has created stories around Superman, but without the depth he says he brought to Batman. If Miller decides to focus on a Superman narrative, it seems like it could be full of Jewish history.

“I wrote Superman as a foil for Batman, but I want to write his story too,” Miller said.

From: http://www.timesofisrael.com/comics-hero-wants-a-superman-who-confronts-jewish-roots/

Comics hero Frank Miller wants a Superman who ‘confronts his …

Christopher Reeve in costume for his role as Superman. (Keystone/Getty Images)

The Jewish history of Superman is well known. Jewish writer Jerry Siegel — who co-created the iconic comic book character with Jewish illustrator Joe Shuster — once said he conceived of Superman after reading about the “slaughter of helpless, oppressed Jews” in Nazi Europe.

The character’s original name from his home planet of Krypton is Kal-El, which sounds very Hebrew (the Hebrew suffix “El,” which comes at the end of many biblical names, like Rachel or Daniel, is an ancient word for God). And in one of the earliest Superman comics, the Man of Steel fulfills a very Jewish fantasy: He captures both Hitler and Stalin and brings them to the League of Nations, where they are tried for war crimes.

More recent iterations of the Superman franchise haven’t alluded to these and other Jewish roots — but famed comic book writer Frank Miller wants to change that.

Miller, whose is known for his work on influential series such as “Sin City,” “300” and “The Dark Knight Returns,” told Inverse at New York’s Comic-Con on Friday that Superman needs to “confront his Jewish roots again.”

“He has a history in World War II, and I’d like to put him there again,” Miller said, alluding to Siegel’s origin story. “Superman needs to confront his Jewish roots, and I’d like to write that. I’d like to have him face a death camp.”

Miller is often credited with introducing the darker style and tone typical of most modern superhero narratives. His popular work on “The Dark Knight” — his characterization of Batman as a conflicted, haunted crime fighter —  is typical of his bringing adult themes to the world of comic books. Miller has created stories around Superman, but without the depth he says he brought to Batman. If Miller decides to focus on a Superman narrative, it seems like it could be full of Jewish history.

“I wrote Superman as a foil for Batman, but I want to write his story too,” Miller said.

From: http://www.jta.org/2016/10/10/life-religion/frank-miller-wants-to-have-superman-confront-his-jewish-roots-in-wwii-comic-story

BATMAN, SUPERMAN, GI JOE, More Comic Books Coming to OCULUS VR

Still from Madefire Oculus video

Credit: Madefire

Comic books are coming to virtual reality, as motion comics publisher Madefire has launched an app for the newly-released Samsung Gear VR from Oculus. Expanding on the company’s proprietary Motion Books platform, these comic books have motion, sound, and now 3-D, 360-degree environments. The Motion Books available at launch are IDW’s Revolution, Framestore’s Somnia: Origins, DC’s Injustice: Year One, and Madefire’s own Mono: The Old Curiosity Shop.

Check out this preview video:

“Comics are such a powerful storytelling format,” said Madefire CEO/Co-Founder Ben Wolstenholme. “People learn to read through comics; people are transported to other worlds through comics. Comics are words-and-pictures, perfect for storytelling in virtual reality.”

This coincides with Madefire’s announcement that it had received $6.5m in Series B investment funding from actor Kevin Spacey, musician Drake, and strategic investors True Ventures, Big Loud Capital, Anthem Ventures, and Framestore Ventures.

From: http://www.newsarama.com/31431-madefire-gets-6-5m-investment-plans-vr-comics-for-oculus.html

A new Superman comic honors Darwyn Cooke, a legendary artist …

Superman and son begin an adventure on Dinosaur Island in the eight issue of Superman from DC Comics. Art by Doug Mahnke and Jaime Mendoza. (Courtesy of DC Entertainment)Superman and his son begin an adventure on Dinosaur Island in the eighth issue of Superman from DC Comics. Art by Doug Mahnke and Jaime Mendoza. (Courtesy of DC Entertainment)

DC Comics is paying tribute to late artist and writer Darwyn Cooke in the pages of Superman No. 8 in a two-part story titled “Escape From Dinosaur Island,” which arrives Wednesday on newsstands both real and digital.

Cooke, who was one of the most influential creators in the comic book industry, died in May at the age of 53, stunning fans and colleagues.

Superman No. 8 takes place on Dinosaur Island, a classic DC Comics locale that was featured in one of Cooke’s most well-known works, “DC: The New Frontier,” a critically acclaimed miniseries Cooke both wrote and illustrated for DC Comics in 2004.

The issue, written by series regular writers Peter Tomasi and Patrick Gleason with art from Doug Mahnke and Jaime Mendoza, will feature Superman and his young son, Jonathan Kent, as they are mysteriously transported to Dinosaur Island while working on a science project together in the Fortress of Solitude, and must try to find their way home.

Cooke’s “The New Frontier,” which gave a new audience to his popular vintage art style, told the story of DC’s most popular superheroes by setting them during the Silver Age of comics, from 1940s through the 1960s. Cooke opened the six issue miniseries with an adventurous tale on Dinosaur Island. It was a part of “The New Frontier” that stood out to many fans and was the most obvious choice for a setting that Tomasi and Gleason could use to pay tribute.


Superman and his son, Jonathan, work on a science project that accidentally sends them to Dinosaur Island, in Superman No. 8. (Courtesy of DC Entertainment)

“We started to think about some way to just kind of tip our hat to Darwyn and the respect we have for him,” Tomasi told The Washington Post’s Comic Riffs. “And what better way than to delve into New Frontier. We basically came up with this cool idea that we could have a lot of fun with and have a lot of emotional drama mixed in with it.”

Gleason never met Cooke personally, but he remembers experiencing his works for the first time, saying he always put aside anything done by Cooke to read and enjoy.

“[Darwyn Cooke’s] work really stood apart,” Gleason remembers. “He really was able to connect with people through his art and his work on so many levels.”

Tomasi recalls the first time he saw the pages to “Batman: Ego,” Cooke’s first project at DC Comics, being passed around the offices of the comic publisher, saying Cooke’s rendition of Batman was nothing short of “amazing.”


Superman’s dog, Krypto, is along for the adventure in Superman No. 8. (Courtesy of DC Entertainment)

Tomasi and Gleason are no stranger to younger readers, having collaborated on “Batman and Robin,” featuring Damian Wayne, son of Bruce Wayne/Batman and the current Robin the Boy Wonder in the DC Comics universe. Tomasi said he hopes that younger readers who have followed him and Gleason to Superman because of the presence of Superman’s son, read issue eight and discover “The New Frontier” from their tribute.

“Maybe they’re opening up a Darwyn Cooke book and falling in love with it for the first time,” Tomasi said.

Tomasi says working on this issue, which also features super-dog Krypto alongside Superman and Jonathan, was a melancholy experience and that he couldn’t help but think about what the future could have held for Cooke’s comic book talents.

“I wanted to see so much more for Darwyn,” Tomasi said. “It was definitely [emotional], but at the same time we both had smiles on our faces knowing that we were doing this cool story that I know Darwyn would have really dug and probably really would have appreciated.”


(Courtesy of DC Entertainment)
(Courtesy of DC Entertainment)
(Courtesy of DC Entertainment)

Read more:

Watching Darwyn Cooke: Writer-artist respects the dissenters — but ‘Before Watchmen’ was too challenging to pass up

From: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/comic-riffs/wp/2016/10/05/a-new-superman-comic-honors-darwyn-cooke-a-legendary-artist-who-died-too-young/

BATMAN, SUPERMAN, G.I. JOE, More Comic Books Coming to …

Still from Madefire Oculus video

Credit: Madefire

Comic books are coming to virtual reality, as motion comics publisher Madefire has launched an app for the newly-released Samsung Gear VR from Oculus. Expanding on the company’s proprietary Motion Books platform, these comic books have motion, sound, and now 3-D, 360-degree environments. The Motion Books available at launch are IDW’s Revolution, Framestore’s Somnia: Origins, DC’s Injustice: Year One, and Madefire’s own Mono: The Old Curiosity Shop.

Check out this preview video:

“Comics are such a powerful storytelling format,” said Madefire CEO/Co-Founder Ben Wolstenholme. “People learn to read through comics; people are transported to other worlds through comics. Comics are words-and-pictures, perfect for storytelling in virtual reality.”

This coincides with Madefire’s announcement that it had received $6.5m in Series B investment funding from actor Kevin Spacey, musician Drake, and strategic investors True Ventures, Big Loud Capital, Anthem Ventures, and Framestore Ventures.

From: http://www.newsarama.com/31431-madefire-gets-6-5m-investment-plans-vr-comics-for-oculus.html

NYCC ’16: DC’s SUPERMAN Family Panel

DC Comics December 2016 solicitations

Credit: DC Comics

Superman is the center of attention in DC’s next New York Comic Con 2016 panel. The “DC Superman Family” panel is scheduled to have Action Comics‘ Pat Gleason, Peter Tomasi and Doug Mahnke; Superwoman‘s Phil Jimenez; and Supergirl‘s Steve Orlando to talk all things Super-.

And as part of Newsarama’s live coverage of NYCC ’16, you can follow along live with our play-by-play below. Just give it time to load up, and follow along:

From: http://www.newsarama.com/31387-nycc-16-dc-s-superman-family-panel.html

A new Superman comic honors Darwyn Cooke, a legendary artist who died too young

Superman and son begin an adventure on Dinosaur Island in the eight issue of Superman from DC Comics. Art by Doug Mahnke and Jaime Mendoza. (Courtesy of DC Entertainment)Superman and his son begin an adventure on Dinosaur Island in the eighth issue of Superman from DC Comics. Art by Doug Mahnke and Jaime Mendoza. (Courtesy of DC Entertainment)

DC Comics is paying tribute to late artist and writer Darwyn Cooke in the pages of Superman No. 8 in a two-part story titled “Escape From Dinosaur Island,” which arrives Wednesday on newsstands both real and digital.

Cooke, who was one of the most influential creators in the comic book industry, died in May at the age of 53, stunning fans and colleagues.

Superman No. 8 takes place on Dinosaur Island, a classic DC Comics locale that was featured in one of Cooke’s most well-known works, “DC: The New Frontier,” a critically acclaimed miniseries Cooke both wrote and illustrated for DC Comics in 2004.

The issue, written by series regular writers Peter Tomasi and Patrick Gleason with art from Doug Mahnke and Jaime Mendoza, will feature Superman and his young son, Jonathan Kent, as they are mysteriously transported to Dinosaur Island while working on a science project together in the Fortress of Solitude, and must try to find their way home.

Cooke’s “The New Frontier,” which gave a new audience to his popular vintage art style, told the story of DC’s most popular superheroes by setting them during the Silver Age of comics, from 1940s through the 1960s. Cooke opened the six issue miniseries with an adventurous tale on Dinosaur Island. It was a part of “The New Frontier” that stood out to many fans and was the most obvious choice for a setting that Tomasi and Gleason could use to pay tribute.


Superman and his son, Jonathan, work on a science project that accidentally sends them to Dinosaur Island, in Superman No. 8. (Courtesy of DC Entertainment)

“We started to think about some way to just kind of tip our hat to Darwyn and the respect we have for him,” Tomasi told The Washington Post’s Comic Riffs. “And what better way than to delve into New Frontier. We basically came up with this cool idea that we could have a lot of fun with and have a lot of emotional drama mixed in with it.”

Gleason never met Cooke personally, but he remembers experiencing his works for the first time, saying he always put aside anything done by Cooke to read and enjoy.

“[Darwyn Cooke’s] work really stood apart,” Gleason remembers. “He really was able to connect with people through his art and his work on so many levels.”

Tomasi recalls the first time he saw the pages to “Batman: Ego,” Cooke’s first project at DC Comics, being passed around the offices of the comic publisher, saying Cooke’s rendition of Batman was nothing short of “amazing.”


Superman’s dog, Krypto, is along for the adventure in Superman No. 8. (Courtesy of DC Entertainment)

Tomasi and Gleason are no stranger to younger readers, having collaborated on “Batman and Robin,” featuring Damian Wayne, son of Bruce Wayne/Batman and the current Robin the Boy Wonder in the DC Comics universe. Tomasi said he hopes that younger readers who have followed him and Gleason to Superman because of the presence of Superman’s son, read issue eight and discover “The New Frontier” from their tribute.

“Maybe they’re opening up a Darwyn Cooke book and falling in love with it for the first time,” Tomasi said.

Tomasi says working on this issue, which also features super-dog Krypto alongside Superman and Jonathan, was a melancholy experience and that he couldn’t help but think about what the future could have held for Cooke’s comic book talents.

“I wanted to see so much more for Darwyn,” Tomasi said. “It was definitely [emotional], but at the same time we both had smiles on our faces knowing that we were doing this cool story that I know Darwyn would have really dug and probably really would have appreciated.”


(Courtesy of DC Entertainment)
(Courtesy of DC Entertainment)
(Courtesy of DC Entertainment)

Read more:

Watching Darwyn Cooke: Writer-artist respects the dissenters — but ‘Before Watchmen’ was too challenging to pass up

From: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/comic-riffs/wp/2016/10/05/a-new-superman-comic-honors-darwyn-cooke-a-legendary-artist-who-died-too-young/

The Batman V Superman Limited Edition Box Set Will Have …

However, that’s not all you get with this package. In addition to the first two DCEU films, the bundle also comes with a copy of Action Comics #1 (Superman’s debut), as well as a copy of Detective Comics #27 (Batman’s debut issue), along with collectible Batman and Superman figurines, and even a set of six trading cards. Without question, there is more than enough awesome content here to keep even the most ardent collector occupied and satisfied for a very, very long time.

From: http://www.cinemablend.com/news/1561760/the-batman-v-superman-limited-edition-box-set-will-have-awesome-dc-collectibles

Superman Action Comics: Path of Doom (Comic) Review

If DC Comics wanted to bring back the past with their Rebirth initiative, they certainly did it with Superman Action Comics: Path of Doom. The comic series spans six issues from Superman Action Comics #957-962. An old threat has returned for Superman – an adversary that cost him is life in 1992.

That menace is none other than Doomsday.

Superman Action Comics: Path of Doom (Comic) Review 3Superman Action Comics: Path of Doom (Comic) Review 3As Path of Doom begins,  a hostage situation is underway. However, it isn’t Superman who flies in to the rescue – it’s his long time arch-nemesis, Lex Luthor. The antagonist has created a pretty cool suit for himself, one that flies, shoots lasers, can regenerate itself, and has Superman’s insignia on its chest. Lex is now the self-proclaimed savior of Metropolis. At the end of DC’s New 52 run, the Superman in that world died.

But with Rebirth, there is another Superman. He’s been a do-gooder in hiding. Yet seeing Lex having his day in the sun as the new Superman of Metropolis is too much for him. He is the older version of Superman, the pre-New 52 Superman – the one who died at the hands of Doomsday and then returned from the dead.

How he’s back, we don’t know. How it all makes sense, this reviewer doesn’t really care. Superman’s back, and that’s all that really matters. Heck, there’s even a Clark Kent, albeit one that doesn’t have any superpowers. Hopefully, though, all will be revealed and we’ll understand how all this confusion came to be.

But again, it’s Superman. It doesn’t really matter if things are in shambles right now.

In Path of Doom, Superman returns with his classic blue and red uniform to confront Lex. But while working out their differences, someone has taken something rather large from aforementioned hostage situation. That is Doomsday and he wants nothing more than to destroy our favourite Kryptonian. Unfortunately for Superman, that means going after his family – his wife Lois Lane and his son.

Superman Action Comics: Path of Doom (Comic) Review 2Superman Action Comics: Path of Doom (Comic) Review 2Writer Dan Jurgens does a wonderful job weaving in this confusing cast of characters (soap operas have nothing on DC Comics right now) and nonstop action. From the first panels until the final splash page of Path of Doom, readers are barraged with a titanic battle – one that brings in not only Luthor into the fray but also Wonder Woman. All are needed for Superman to wage war against Doomsday. The only drawback is the storyline is that it lasts about one issue too long. It is such an action-heavy series that this reader felt some fatigue, needing the pace to slow down in order to not feel sheer exhaustion in the last few issues.

The artwork is shared by three illustrators – Patrick Zircher, Tyler Kirkham and Stephen Segovia. All do a bang-up job, but Zircher’s style resonated most with this reviewer. Their shared vision brings the six issue battle to life, giving those of us reading The Death of Superman comic in 1992 a gift. In that year, Superman and Doomsday only went toe-to-toe in one issue. Here we get to see them pound one another over six issues – a true treat.

In the end, Path of Doom is a guilty pleasure. Being the first story arc for Superman Action Comics Rebirth, it punches its way into fans hearts. There is no subtlety with Path of Doom. It’s all action, all the time. Looks like DC took the title Action Comics quite literally this time.

Luckily, we’re all the better for it.

From: http://www.cgmagonline.com/reviews/superman-action-comics-path-doom-comic-review/

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