Henry Cavill Reveals He’d Like to Make a Film Based on DC’s … – CBR

Henry Cavill doesn’t seem anywhere near ready to put away the cape and tights, and the Man of Steel actor even has an idea which famous comic book storyline he would like to see adapted as a Superman film.

Speaking with with Square Mile, Cavill discussed the possibility of doing a Man of Steel sequel, rather than another ensemble film in the vein of Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice or Justice League. He also called the DC storyline “For Tomorrow,” by Brian Azzarello, Jim Lee and Scott Williams “one of my favorite comic books. I would definitely like to tell a story like that.”

RELATED: Is Henry Cavill Preparing to Play Superman Again (Pretty Soon)?

“For Tomorrow” was Lee’s follow-up to the epic success of Batman: Hush, on which he collaborated with writer Jeph Loeb and, of course, his longtime inker Williams. Just like “Hush,” the storyline was a year-long effort, taking place in Superman #204-215. Unlike “Hush,” however, which was framed in such a way that Batman would either team-up with or fight a classic supervillain or superhero in each issue, “For Tomorrow” had more of an contained narrative, with Superman dealing with an ethical conflict throughout the story.

The storyline took place one year after “The Vanishing,” where a million people disappeared from Earth, including Superman’s wife, Lois Lane. Superman had been talking over his issues with a fatally ill priest, Father Leone, since the Vanishing. Eventually, he traced the effects of the Vanishing to a Middle Eastern country whose tyrannical leader has a superpowered being working for him known as Equus. After a brutal clash between Superman and Equus, there was a second Vanishing. Superman decided to trigger another Vanishing himself, but Wonder Woman arrived to try to stop him from what seemed to her to be certain death. Superman fought her off and successfully vanished. He then learned that he had himself built an alternate dimension as a place to send the people of Earth if the events of Krypton’s destruction occurred again. He had wiped the events from his mind, but that is where the vanished people had been for the past year. In the end, he brought the people back home, but in the process, Father Leone was manipulated into becoming a new version of Equus.

RELATED: Henry Cavill Flies to Iconic Superman Score in Justice League BTS Video

Cavill specifically talked about what he hopes to accomplish with new Superman stories, noting, “There’s an opportunity to keep on telling Superman stories, and getting them exactly right. Showing the things like hope and joy and that wonderful power of his to make people believe in themselves.” Those were elements that were certainly present in “For Tomorrow,” so it will be interesting to see if it ever does get adapted.

From: https://www.cbr.com/henry-cavill-superman-comic-adaptation/

Watch DC Comics’ Official TV Spot for New Bendis Superman Comics

Watch DC Comics' Official TV Spot for New Bendis Superman Comics

Watch DC Comics’ official TV spot for new Bendis Superman comics

After wrapping up his Man of Steel mini-series, Brian Michael Bendis is moving on to bigger things. The famed comic writer will be taking over both the Action Comics and Superman series moving forward and to commemorate the occasion DC has officially released a commercial for the new comics. Check it out in the player below and look for it to air on television!

The first of these new issues to debut will be Superman #1 which arrives in stores on July 11. Featuring art by Joe Prado and Ivan Reis, the series is described as follows: A bold new chapter for the greatest superhero of all time begins here as the superstar team of writer Brian Michael Bendis and artist Ivan Reis begin their run on the all-new SUPERMAN! The fallout from the Man of Steel miniseries has Clark Kent looking at the world through new eyes…with new ideas about what Superman could and should do for the city of Metropolis and the planet Earth. His first job? Getting the planet back out of the Phantom Zone!

In a continuation of the ongoing series, Action Comics #1001 will arrive on July 25. Featuring art by Patrick Gleason, the series is officially described as follows: “Acclaimed writer Brian Michael Bendis’ new chapter for the Man of Steel and the world of tomorrow begins here! The devastating repercussions from the Man of Steel miniseries still reverberate as Metropolis enters a new age! The Daily Planet teeters on the brink of disaster! A new criminal element has made its way onto the streets of Superman’s hometown! The longest- running superhero comic of all time explodes off the page with art by fan favorite Patrick Gleason.”

Are you looking forward to the new Bendis Superman comic books? Sound off in the comments below!

From: http://www.superherohype.com/news/418533-tv-spot-bendis-superman-comics

Bendis Promises Lois & Jon Will Return to Superman Comics in ‘Big …

While writer Brian Michael Bendis‘ run on Superman has seen the Man of Steel isolated from his wife and son, the writer assures fans the separation is only temporary.

When a reader expressed dismay that the new DC writer had written Lois Lane and Jonathan Kent from his upcoming ongoing run as seen in the recently concluded Man of Steel miniseries, Bendis tweeted that Clark Kent’s burgeoning family will return in the pages of both Superman and Action Comics.

RELATED: Brian Michael Bendis’ Superman Comics to Be Promoted With TV Campaign

One of the central mysteries driving the six-issue miniseries officially launching Bendis’ run on the character was what became of Lois and Jon. Gradually revealed over the course of the story, the final issue showed the Man of Tomorrow’s biological father Jor-El inviting his grandson to accompany him on an educational tour of the universe rather than confining his formative years on Earth. Despite his own grave concerns, Kal-El was unable to convince Jon otherwise with Lois volunteering to accompany her son and father-in-law rather than leave Jon alone with his less-than-trustworthy grandfather.

Before taking to the stars, Lois secures an advance book deal for her upcoming interstellar voyages and promises her husband that she and her son will return to him.

RELATED: Bendis On Reviving Jinxworld, New Collaborators His DC Comics Imprint

With Bendis teasing a “big, bold story” returning the mother and son to both Superman ongoing series, the Kent family reunion is shaping up to be one for the ages.

In the meantime, Superman #1 relaunching DC’s flagship character is out this week on July 11. The issue is written by Brian Michael Bendis with art by Ivan Reis and Joe Prado.

From: https://www.cbr.com/bendis-promises-lois-jon-return-superman-big-story/

In the age of Trump, we need new superheroes


The June 1938 cover of Action Comics featured Superman. (Metropolis Collectibles/AP)

Superman was the first superhero to introduce Americans to a new role for their government. Unlike the grandiose spectacle of the hero’s current cinematic iterations, Superman’s first appearance in 1938 showed him combating social issues. In the debut issue of Action Comics, he saved a woman from death row who had been wrongly accused, prevented a domestic abuser from further harming his wife and stopped a gangster from blackmailing a senator.

Delivering justice, protecting family and stopping corruption, Superman represented the newly expanded New Deal state. His immense power could seem threatening — after all, an unstoppable alien could just as easily be villain as hero — but Superman vowed to use his powers only to advance the greater good and fight pervasive social ills. He had an infallible moral compass and an unquenchable desire to make the world a safer and fairer place.

At a time when President Franklin D. Roosevelt made bold claims of leadership and executive power, Superman mirrored the benefits for American society, embodying the palpable determination of an administration calling for “action, and action now.” Admonishing the greed and selfishness of the Roaring Twenties, the Roosevelt administration swiftly enacted laws and executive orders aimed at protecting and assisting those most vulnerable in society, such as the Social Security Act, the Wagner Act (which protected unions) and the formation of the U.S. Housing Authority.

In the pages of the comics, Superman did the same. Stories like “The Blakely Mine Disaster” and “Superman in the Slums” highlighted issues surrounding the right of the worker to a safe working environment and the need for adequate housing.

If Superman helped readers adjust to the sweeping social reforms of New Deal America, another superhero — Captain America — prepared them for war. Making his first appearance for Marvel (then known as Timely Comics) in March 1940, this indefatigable patriot represented “the American ideal — individual freedom, individual responsibility, moral sensitivity, integrity, and a willingness to fight for right,” an editor wrote in one issue.

Both his costume and his iconic round shield were emblazoned with the Stars and Stripes of his home country. Captain America battled Nazis and any other villain who dared threaten the unquestionable divinity of a free world. Planting the seeds of American interventionism mere months before the attack on Pearl Harbor (and at a time when Roosevelt was struggling to convince Americans of the threat they faced), the superhero simultaneously embodied and protected the fusion of American identity and foreign policy.

On comic pages, Superman and Captain America championed American self-confidence at a time of international uncertainty. The Writers’ War Board understood this well. During World War II, the U.S. Office of War Information used comic books as propaganda tools to encourage brave and admirable depictions of America’s identity. On the cover of Captain America Issue No. 1, a fearless Captain delivers a knockout punch to Hitler, decrying fascism as “the menace of hate and oppression, of tyranny and evil which is sweeping over the world.” Superman, in turn, sought to raise money for the war by encouraging readers to buy war bonds to “knock out the Axis.”

These characters sold a particular version of the war and its aims: celebrating diversity, domestic cooperation between labor and business and an international role for the United States abroad. Contrasted against the evils of fascism, America became the antithesis to a gruesome ideology espoused by Nazi Germany and its contempt toward freedom, individuality and human rights.

And it worked. The overt patriotism of Captain America and Superman contributed to the confidence, morale and pocketbook of the Allied Powers. Their moral certainty stood in stark contrast to the chaos and anarchy ravaging the European continent, and it helped Americans adjust to a new internationalism that the war ushered in.

During a time of upheaval at home and the looming threat of war aboard, comic books fortified new interpretations of the American spirit and a burgeoning American hegemony. Superman and Captain America were idealized notions of the American character, notions that became deeply intertwined with U.S. foreign policy. These heroes acted as a vehicle through which America could explore, dissect and ultimately understand both its national character and, eventually, its Cold War foreign policy.

And so, perhaps as America’s international prestige diminishes and its national identity becomes more exclusionary for the first time in decades, we should revisit the pages of comic books and those early adventures of Superman and Captain America for inspiration. Their early stories cemented the vision of America as a righteous and noble leader of nations in the hearts and minds of readers, a vision either lost to antiquity or simply lying dormant. And it’s a vision that we must endeavor to resuscitate in a world once again yearning for moral leadership.

The United States once again finds itself at a momentous turning-point in history. By casting its gaze back to these influential stories from a time of great uncertainty, the nation has an opportunity to adjust its faltering course, reevaluate its core principles and strive anew for the virtuous and heroic identity it has long sought to champion.

From: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/made-by-history/wp/2018/07/08/in-the-age-of-trump-we-need-new-superheroes/

Bendis Says Summer Superman Comics to be Promoted on TV – CBR

Man of Steel writer Brian Michael Bendis has confirmed that DC Comics’ upcoming summer Superman titles will be advertised via television commercials. It’s uncommon for comic book ads to appear on television, but, according to the writer, it is exactly what some comic book shops have been asking of publishers for years.

RELATED: Is DC Universe’s Comics Library the Answer to Marvel Unlimited? Not Really

The move comes just one week after DC Comics unveiled more details about its long-awaited DC Universe service, which will bundle together a streaming library, comics reader and store when it releases in August. Much like Marvel Unlimited, the service looks to bring more comics readers into the hobby through increased accessibility.

If anything can be extrapolated from recent comic book sales numbers, it’s that a hefty dose of accessibility might be what the industry needs right now. CBR’s April tabulations pegged 2018 as the worst year for comic book sales since 2011. Even Action Comics #1000 impressive sales didn’t significantly tip the scales for the month.

RELATED: Supergirl Is the Most Tragic Character in Bendis’ Man of Steel

Meanwhile, Bendis has garnered praise for his Man of Steel run, which has pitted Superman and Supergirl against the villain Rogol Zaar. August will see the return of Bendis’ Jinxworld line, the name of the writer’s creator-owned series that predates his run at Marvel Comics.

From: https://www.cbr.com/brian-michael-bendis-superman-tv-commercials/

Electric Superman Is ‘Not Superman…and Never Will Be’

In Meta-Messages, I explore the context behind (using reader danjack’s term) “meta-messages.” A meta-message is where a comic book creator comments on/references the work of another comic book/comic book creator (or sometimes even themselves) in their comic. Each time around, I’ll give you the context behind one such “meta-message.” This time around, we look at some friendly teasing of the “Electric Blue” era of Superman during a “Y2K” storyline in 2000.

Many moons ago, there was a classic early 1960s “imaginary story” in Superman #162 (imaginary stories were DC Comics stories that were set outside of the regular DC Comics continuity. So stuff could happen in them that would never actually happen in the comics) about Superman being rebuked by the people of Kandor for not doing enough for the world (by the way, that is such a Silver Age conceit – people turn on each other WAY too much in the Silver Age. Can you imagine someone saying, “You suck, Superman! If you don’t shape up in the next six months, we’re replacing you”?

Anyhow, Superman is saddened by their disappointment in him so he decides to do an experimental procedure that transforms him into two duplicate versions of himself, who are now both even smarter than before…

Superman Red and Superman Blue essentially solve all of the world’s problems and they even each settle the whole “Who will Superman choose between Lois Lane and Lana Lang?” debate by having Superman Red and Superman Blue each marry one of them.

It was a memorable story, but it was “just” an imaginary story.

That was until many years later, when Superman lost his powers during the Final Night crossover (where the Earths’ sun was extinguished). Superman got super-charged to get his powers back, but as it turns out, he got TOO much of a charge and slowly but surely, the solar energy in his body was getting out of control and his body began to change and transform into pure energy. Profesor Emil Hamilton built him a special containment suit and Superman now had a new costume and new powers that were based on energy rather than pure physical strength.

After a while, the Superman writers then took this twist a step further by having Superman’s energy split so that he formed, yep, you guessed it, two versions of himself, one dubbed Superman Red and the other Superman Blue…

The two energy beings merged back together and brought back classic Superman just in time for his 50th anniversay in 1998 (funny how that stuff works out).

In any event, by this time, the main Superman creators had been on the books for a number of years and DC decided to do a big change, replacing a number of the more veteran creators on the series for a new group of creators (while keeping a few of the newer creative teams, like Mark Schulz and Doug Mahnke and Stuart Immonen writing/drawing a book, on board).

The new teams took over in late 1999.

One of their first big crossover was as a “Y2K” event with Brainiac-13 coming to Earth from the future. Brainiac-13 was drawn with computer imagery…

Superman had to figure out a way to stop Brainiac, even if it meant revisiting his “blue period”…

Page 2:

From: https://www.cbr.com/superman-electric-blue-not-superman/

DC Comics’ Superman Immortalised in Pure Silver to Celebrate 80 Years

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From: https://www.thedailytimes.com/entertainment/dc-comics-superman-immortalised-in-pure-silver-to-celebrate-years/article_5f6e7fc0-5ff0-5414-a62b-469f28398f33.html

DC to Promote Bendis’ Superman Comics With TV Commercials

DC Entertainment, who have been reaching out to non-traditional comics audiences in recent weeks with announcements that they will sell certain titles outside of the direct market and include digital comics as part of their streaming TV platform, will promote Brian Michael Bendis’s upcoming runs on Superman and Action Comics with TV advertising, the writer revealed today.

There are no details of when or where the spot will air, but Bendis noted that retailers and fans are frequently encouraging publishers to spend money to reach outside of the direct market — and that this is a step in that direction.

“Just approved a cut of the TV commercial DC is gearing up for our Superman titles this summer,” Bendis tweeted. “It’s the kind of promotion stores have been asking publishers to do for years. So exciting! Promotion! Outreach!”

Bendis, who has been one of Marvel’s most prolific and best-selling writers for years, came to DC late last year with the news that he would launch a weekly Superman title called The Man of Steel to run through June, and then relaunch Superman and resume the original numbering on Action Comics with #1,001.

Bendis’s final issue of The Man of Steel is just hours away from release, and sets the stage for his Superman and Action Comics runs.

During a recent interview with ComicBook.com, Bendis said that Jor-El, who has been skulking around the DC Universe for years as the mysterious figure known as Mr. Oz, is the “lynchpin” around which the next year of Superman stories will be told.

TV spots are not unheard-of for Marvel and DC, but they are few, far-between, and mostly “air” only online or during one or two comics-friendly timeslots before being shuffled away. One such spot was created for the first volumes of DC’s Rebirth collected editions, but that was seen more as a concession to the bookstore market than anything that comics retailers would directly benefit from.

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Radio ads, especially on the Marvel side of things, are a bit more common — but as a rule, comics publishers are reluctant to spend money to advertise outside of their own pages or friendly trade magazines and websites.

The Man of Steel #6 is in stores on July 4.

From: http://comicbook.com/dc/2018/07/04/dc-to-promote-bendis-superman-comics-with-tv-commercials/

Brian Michael Bendis’ Superman Comics to Be Promoted With TV Campaign

Man of Steel writer Brian Michael Bendis has confirmed that DC Comics’ upcoming summer Superman titles will be advertised via television commercials. It’s uncommon for comic book ads to appear on television, but, according to the writer, it is exactly what some comic book shops have been asking of publishers for years.

RELATED: Is DC Universe’s Comics Library the Answer to Marvel Unlimited? Not Really

The move comes just one week after DC Comics unveiled more details about its long-awaited DC Universe service, which will bundle together a streaming library, comics reader and store when it releases in August. Much like Marvel Unlimited, the service looks to bring more comics readers into the hobby through increased accessibility.

If anything can be extrapolated from recent comic book sales numbers, it’s that a hefty dose of accessibility might be what the industry needs right now. CBR’s April tabulations pegged 2018 as the worst year for comic book sales since 2011. Even Action Comics #1000 impressive sales didn’t significantly tip the scales for the month.

RELATED: Supergirl Is the Most Tragic Character in Bendis’ Man of Steel

Meanwhile, Bendis has garnered praise for his Man of Steel run, which has pitted Superman and Supergirl against the villain Rogol Zaar. August will see the return of Bendis’ Jinxworld line, the name of the writer’s creator-owned series that predates his run at Marvel Comics.

From: https://www.cbr.com/brian-michael-bendis-superman-tv-commercials/

Superman goes to college

By WILLIAM PAINE

william.paine@southwesttimes.com

Six years ago, Gary Bryant, who works at New River Community College’s library, found a Publisher’s Weekly article on his desk about comic book conventions, commonly known as comic-cons, or comic cons. Sandy Smith, library coordinator, was well aware of Bryant’s love of comics, so it wasn’t surprising that she might leave an article about these popular conventions on his desk.

For Bryant, though, this wasn’t a random article but an invitation. That day, Bryant came into Smith’s office and said, “Hey, let’s try it!” That’s how New River Community College Comic-con was conceived.

“I got into comics at an early age and never got over the sickness,” Bryant admitted. Growing up in Glasgow, he watched Superman on his family’s black and white television and soon started collecting comic books featuring Superman, as well as other characters possessing super powers. Much of Bryant’s attraction to comics had to do with art. As a youngster, Bryant made drawings of his favorite superheroes, a pastime he continues to this day.

Bryant attended Madison College (now James Madison University) and worked at the school’s library. After graduating with an art degree in 1975, Bryant attained employment at the Rockbridge County Library. During this time, he submitted drawings that were published in the editorial page of a newspaper based in Lexington.

 

In 1980, Bryant began working in the design department at Burlington Carpet Factory in Rockbridge County. He designed carpet patterns. The factory job paid well, but “It just wasn’t creative in my way of thinking because, I like drawing people and monsters and things like that.”

When a job became available in the library at New River Community College’s in 1985, he applied, was accepted, and has been working and living in Dublin ever since. In some ways, it wasn’t a big change. “Moving here was sort of like coming to Glasgow. Pulaski was sort of like Buena Vista and Radford is sort of like Lexington. It’s like I moved to the same kind of general area.”

Working at the circulation desk at NRCC, Bryant takes a little flak from time to time. “Some people are very happy and some are not. If they get overdues they may not be happy but we just try to take care of them and straighten it out as friendly and quickly as we can.”

All in all, Bryant enjoys his work as a librarian. “I like it when you find something people are looking for or you show them something that they didn’t even know we had. You know, making people happy.”

But it’s NRCC’s annual comic-con that really sparks his passion.

So, what happens at such an event?

“Comic-con is just a bunch of comic book fans coming together enjoying the same thing and not seeming like they are the nerds or the geeks. Everybody’s the same at comic-con and you find out that a lot of the people you wouldn’t think are nerds, are nerds. Some people dress up in costume so it’s an interesting thing. I’m going to a big one this weekend in Charlotte. That’s a three-day convention and it’s big,” he said.

Though not as large as comic-con gatherings in Charlotte or San Diego, attendance at NRCC’s Comic-con has seen steady growth. The first year, Bryant expected to see 300 attend and was surprised to count 500. Last year’s event drew 1,500 people, many in costume.

Those attending a comic-con can expect variety. “We have vendors where you can buy comics and toys and collectables. We have comic book writers and artists. We have people that are self-publishing comics. We have science fiction and fantasy writers and we have film guests sometimes,” he says.

The event’s centerpiece or theme comes in the form of panel discussions presented by well-known figures in the comic world. “We have panels during the day where the guests talk about different subjects,” Bryant said. “This year, Michael Euri, who was the editor of Back Issue Magazine and Retro Fun Magazine, is going to do an “80 Years of Superman” panel for us. He did one last year on black superheroes and it was great.”

Superman first appeared in Detective Comics (now DC Comics) in June 1938, after appearing in several TV shows and films. The caped crusader is still going strong with plans in the works for yet another movie.

This sits well with Bryant, who has always appreciated the defender of truth, justice and the American way. “I think Superman represents good. That’s my problem with the new movies. They’re too dark,” he said. “That’s why I like Christopher Reeves’ movies. He had a sense of humor and, after all, his powers are based on sunlight, unlike Batman who is supposed to be in the dark and grim. Superman is supposed to be in the light and people can trust him even though he’s an alien.”

This year, NRCC Comic-Con is in October and will be spread out among four large campus buildings. “I definitely could not do this by myself. It takes a village to put this on because we start working on the next one right after the last one ends,” Bryant said.

Presenting one of these comic conventions at a community college is a complex and quirky endeavor, so why do it at all?

“It brings people in who have never been here before,” he explains. “They see what our school is like. They realize that it’s more than just academics. We have a wide range of ages too. We have young kids and older people that remember comic books or maybe it’s a grandparent bringing their child into the show. …We’ve had people come here who have never been here before saying, ‘Wow, you have such a beautiful campus.’ So, it’s just a way to get NRCC out there and have some fun.”

NRCC Comic-con 5 is Saturday, Oct. 27, 10 a.m. to 4p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

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From: https://www.southwesttimes.com/2018/07/superman-goes-to-college/

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