DC Comics, Mark Hamill, and More Mourn Death of ‘Superman’ Actress Margot Kidder

According to CNN, Margot Kidder—cinema’s first Lois Lane and genre-film icon—passed away peacefully in her sleep yesterday at 69 years of age. While an entire generation was first introduced to Kidder with Superman in 1978 and its sequels, she was an incredibly appreciated part of the horror film community as well, and became a powerful advocate of mental health over the course of her life. 

Before starring in genre-defining films such as Superman, Black Christmas, and The Amityville Horror, Kidder spent her childhood in the Northwest Territories of Canada and eventually got her start on the Canadian television series Wojeck in 1969. 

Lois Lane, though obviously not the title character, was as important to Superman’s success as Christopher Reeves was. The character was a tough, independent go-getter with intellect, integrity, and presence that only an actress as engaging and relatable as Kidder could’ve provided. Personally, Superman was the first superhero movie I ever saw, and I distinctly remember thinking I’d love to have a girlfriend like Lois one day. 

In regards to her personal life, Kidder was diagnosed with bipolar disorder and became homeless in 1996. The weight of fame, three marriages, and preposterous medical bills became too much for her—or anyone, for that matter—to process. 

“Nothing prepares anyone for that sudden thing of being world famous, it was such a shock,” she said. “It wasn’t until something I really liked or something I was very good at. I didn’t realize how good the movie was until I seen it at the premiere in Washington.” 

Fortunately, Kidder’s passing was reportedly peaceful, calm, and gentle. Sadly, the world is just a tad bit gloomier now that she’s gone. We’d say she’ll be missed, but that’s already more than clear. Have a look at some of the Twitter reactions to her passing below, and realize how many creative people she herself inspired to pursue their own dreams. Rest in peace.

From: http://www.complex.com/pop-culture/2018/05/dc-comics-mark-hamill-more-mourn-death-of-superman-actress-margot-kidder/

Vintage Superman, Batman comic lot auction grabs $6.5 million on …

A massive lot of vintage comic books and original art sold today for a combined $6.5 million and that number could total upwards of $10 million, with two more days to go.

Heritage Auctions in Chicago started selling the books and the art on Thursday, which include rare gems like “Action Comics” #1 from 1938, which is the first time Superman appeared, “Batman” #1 from 1940 and·”Justice League of America” #1 from 1960.

The comic with Superman’s first appearance nabbed $573,600, while “Batman” #1 was purchased for $227,050.

PHOTO: A copy of the first comic book to feature Superman is going up for sale, Action Comics #1, 1938.Heritage Auctions
A copy of the first comic book to feature Superman is going up for sale, Action Comics #1, 1938.

“We expect this to be one of the largest comic book auctions ever held,” Eric Bradley, director of public relations for Heritage Auctions, told ABC News. He added the total proceeds after the weekend could reach upwards of $9 million to $10 million.

Bradley said auctions of vintage comics and original art have exploded in recent years because of Marvel Cinematic Universe films and those by Warner Bros. that include stars from the DC Comics universe.

PHOTO: A copy of Batman #1 comic book will be up for sale, featuring the first appearance of The Joker and Catwoman.Heritage Auctions
A copy of Batman #1 comic book will be up for sale, featuring the first appearance of The Joker and Catwoman.

“We also expect great things on the horizons for Venom and Deadpool with those films coming out,” he said.

In fact, one lucky Deadpool fan grabbed a piece of the “Merc with a Mouth”‘s history in this auction.

PHOTO: A page of art from the comic featuring the first appearance of Deadpool, will be up for sale. Heritage Auctions
A page of art from the comic featuring the first appearance of Deadpool, will be up for sale.

Original art from his first appearance in “New Mutants” #98, from the 1990’s, sold for more than $50,000.

“We also have original cover art from ‘Amazing Spiderman’ #61, the first cover appearance of Gwen Stacy,” Bradley added.

That piece sold for $163,000.

The highest sale of the day went to a Frank Frazetta painting, that went for $1.7 million.

And don’t fret, anyone not in Chicago you can head to Heritage’s website for all the big listings.

ABC News and Marvel Comics are both part of parent company Disney.

From: https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Culture/supermans-appearance-batman-deadpool-art-part-10-million/story?id=55068788

Superman Dies, Flashpoint Might & More DC Movie News

Superman is going to die! Don’t worry, he’ll be back, though not until next year. Warner Bros. and DC Entertainment are adapting The Death of Superman once again. This time, it’ll probably hew a little closer to the original comics, only with an updated Justice League roster. A new trailer came out today, it’s not looking bad at all. Here’s the trailer, courtesy of IGN.

Lex Luthor’s presence feels a little tacked on here (he really has nothing to do in this story), but the action on display is pretty exciting. It’s well-animated, and does a nice job of communicating just how dangerous Doomsday is. Watching him rip through members of the Justice League as though they were nothing really builds excitement for the climactic battle with Superman. Even though we all know exactly how it ends, it’ll still be cool to watch it play out in full motion. Especially when the animation looks this good.

The DC Animated movies have been hit and miss, but there’s still plenty of good in this series. Sure, The Killing Joke and Batman and Harley Quinn were tone deaf and shoddy, but Batman: Under the Red Hood, Justice League: Doom, and Batman: Gotham by Gaslight were all fantastic animated adaptations of some of DC’s best storylines. And besides, after Batman v. Superman, we can all use a reminder that this story can be done well. When it doesn’t have to share a movie with a bunch of Dark Knight Returns references.

Even better, they’re using these next two animated movies to go into the Reign of the Supermen story that followed Superman’s death in the comics. The Death of Superman will release later this summer, and it’s follow-up Reign of the Supermen will hit early 2019.

Over in the live-action DCEU, Warner Bros. is trying to line up more directors to bring DC superheroes to the big screen. One of those directors is apparently Peter Jackson. TheOneRing.net, generally a reliable source for things like this, reports that Jackson is currently deciding between helming a DCEU movie and helping Amazon with their Lord of the Rings TV series.

So which should it be? Mr. Jackson: I know there’s no possible way you’re reading this, and should by no means make career decisions based on the whims of some guy writing on the internet, but please. Go with DC. Do something new. Bring all the vision and grandeur that made the Lord of the Rings trilogy so great to a series that really needs it. A DC movie directed by Jackson could be amazing. Especially if he dived into his horror movie roots and gave us a real nightmare-inducing villain. I’m still not entirely recovered from watching Dead Alive/Brain Dead as a kid.

So what DC superhero could use the Peter Jackson touch? Well, given his experience with making movies about rings, Green Lantern seems like a natural step. Jokes aside, a story with a cosmic scale like that would actually suit his talents really well. He could probably do something cool with the planned Black Adam movie too. Or who knows? Maybe he could be the one to make DCEU superman finally work with Man of Steel 2. Thinking about it more, you could make a beautiful Superman movie with Jackson in the director’s chair.

Honestly, though, I’m confident he can make any DC movie great. Just please don’t go back to the Lord of the Rings well. Those three movies were such a labor of love for everyone involved, and there’s just no way this Amazon series will feel the same way. Remember the last time Peter Jackson was pulled back into Middle Earth after being done with it for years? We got The Hobbit trilogy. Nobody wants that again.

Still more uncertainty in the DCEU, The Flash movie may have lost its plot entirely. It’s been in development hell for so long, and Warner Bros. just can’t seem to get this thing off the ground. It’s lost directors, dealt with rumors of actors leaving or being recast, and now there’s news of yet another possible setback. The rumor comes from a tweet from The Wrap reporter Umberto Gonzalez. He’s been extremely reliable when it comes to the goings on of the DCEU, so folks tend to take his tweets pretty seriously.

That’s Jeffrey Dean Morgan as Thomas Wayne, fading away just like half the planet did at the end of Avengers: Infinity War. The Marvel movie’s climactic moment has been turned into a meme in the weeks since its release, and Gonzalez appears to be implying that Thomas Wayne as Batman is no more. Those familiar with the Flashpoint story arc in the comics will remember that in the alternate timeline The Flash creates, Thomas Wayne, rather than Bruce, becomes Batman. That was going to be the plan for the first Flash solo movie, rumored to be retitled Flashpoint. Now, it’s looking like that idea might be scrapped.

That could be a good thing. Flashpoint is the kind of story you do later in the game. After we’ve been introduced to all the characters in The Flash’s story. An alternate universe doesn’t mean anything if we aren’t already familiar with the original one. It’s an extremely poor choice of story for the DCEU’s first Flash solo flick. But this move has already been through so much change, all I want is for them to just pick a plot and make the damn thing. You’d think after Ezra Miller’s Flash was the only universally liked part of Justice League, getting his solo movie out would be a top priority. Instead, it feels like nobody can decide what they want to do with the character.

Hopefully the decision, if it actually has been made, turns out to be a good one. The Flash deserves the chance to be in his own movie without any distracting gimmicks or other superheroes stealing the spotlight. He’s one of my favorite DC heroes, and I just wish they’d get on with this movie already.

Harley Quinn in Suicide Squad

Harley Quinn in Suicide Squad (Photo via Warner Bros.)

Finally, there’s some exciting news coming out of DC concerning the Cathy Yan-directed Birds of Prey movie. The film will feature Harley Quinn, and Batgirl, in addition to a few other characters that haven’t been announced yet. Not much beyond that is known at this point, but we now have an idea of the kind of tone the movie will go for. Actress and producer Margot Robbie talked about the movie in an interview with Collider.

“I pitched the idea of an R-rated girl gang film including Harley, because I was like, ‘Harley needs friends.’ Harley loves interacting with people, so don’t ever make her do a standalone film. She’s got to be with other people, it should be a girl gang. I wasn’t seeing enough girl gangs on screen, especially in the action space. So that was always a big part of it,” Robbie said.

That’s… a really good idea. That’s a movie I want to see. Not that an R-rating would automatically make a superhero movie great, but it fits a character like Harley Quinn. Especially with the kind of tone Robbie’s talking about here. A bonkers girl-gang action movie could be exactly what the DCEU needs. And with the tone it’s established so far, an R-rating would be nearly as jarring as it would be coming out of, say, Marvel Studios. It’s also encouraging to hear how dedicated she is to this character and this movie. She’s put a ton of thought and work into this, and that can only make the eventual movie better. Now, it just can’t come out soon enough.

 

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From: https://www.geek.com/movies/dceu-news-superman-dies-flashpoint-might-more-dc-movie-news-1739797/

Comics, art auction nets more than $8M with debut of Superman going for $573K

While Superman’s debut in Action Comics #1 from 1938 grabbed all the headlines, it was Frank Frazetta’s “Death Dealer 6” painting that walked away with more than $1.7 million at a Chicago-based comics and arts auction. 

Heritage Auctions reports Superman’s first appearance in Action Comics #1 sold for $573,600, which was nearly $80,000 less than its estimated value of $650,000 prior to Thursday’s sale. This version of what many consider one of the “Holy Grails” of comics’ condition was rated as being a four out of 10 by the Certified Guaranty Company — CGC Comics.  

Back in 2014, a copy of Action Comics No. 1 sold for $3,207,852 in an online eBay auction. This version was rated a nine out of 10, and was said to be in “pristine” condition. 

On the other side, Frazetta’s science fiction and fantasy piece “Death Dealer 6” sold for nearly three times its estimated sale price at $1,792,500. The painting was estimated to net $600,000 before the May 10 auction. Another notable sale was a Batman comic from 1940 featuring the debut of both Joker and Catwoman that sold for $227,050. 

Heritage reports that all together, the comics and arts auction accounted for $8,395,272 in sales on Thursday in Chicago. For a full rundown of items and sale prices, click here. 

“This auction has a chance to be among the largest comics auctions of all time, if not the largest,” Heritage Auctions Comics director Barry Sandoval said in a news release prior to the event. 

“It will be in a vibrant city that is easy to reach from just about anywhere, and we have an extremely strong collection of valuable comic books that will draw the attention and interest of comics collectors from just about everywhere.”

Other items sold at the event include several early Playboy issues, with #1 signed by Hugh Hefner, Action Comics #7 and Batman #1. 

From: http://www.mlive.com/news/us-world/index.ssf/2018/05/comics_art_auction_nets_more_t.html

Vintage Superman, Batman comic lot auction grabs $6.5 million on day 1

A massive lot of vintage comic books and original art sold today for a combined $6.5 million and that number could total upwards of $10 million, with two more days to go.

Heritage Auctions in Chicago started selling the books and the art on Thursday, which include rare gems like “Action Comics” #1 from 1938, which is the first time Superman appeared, “Batman” #1 from 1940 and·”Justice League of America” #1 from 1960.

The comic with Superman’s first appearance nabbed $573,600, while “Batman” #1 was purchased for $227,050.

PHOTO: A copy of the first comic book to feature Superman is going up for sale, Action Comics #1, 1938.Heritage Auctions
A copy of the first comic book to feature Superman is going up for sale, Action Comics #1, 1938.

“We expect this to be one of the largest comic book auctions ever held,” Eric Bradley, director of public relations for Heritage Auctions, told ABC News. He added the total proceeds after the weekend could reach upwards of $9 million to $10 million.

Bradley said auctions of vintage comics and original art have exploded in recent years because of Marvel Cinematic Universe films and those by Warner Bros. that include stars from the DC Comics universe.

PHOTO: A copy of Batman #1 comic book will be up for sale, featuring the first appearance of The Joker and Catwoman.Heritage Auctions
A copy of Batman #1 comic book will be up for sale, featuring the first appearance of The Joker and Catwoman.

“We also expect great things on the horizons for Venom and Deadpool with those films coming out,” he said.

In fact, one lucky Deadpool fan grabbed a piece of the “Merc with a Mouth”‘s history in this auction.

PHOTO: A page of art from the comic featuring the first appearance of Deadpool, will be up for sale. Heritage Auctions
A page of art from the comic featuring the first appearance of Deadpool, will be up for sale.

Original art from his first appearance in “New Mutants” #98, from the 1990’s, sold for more than $50,000.

“We also have original cover art from ‘Amazing Spiderman’ #61, the first cover appearance of Gwen Stacy,” Bradley added.

That piece sold for $163,000.

The highest sale of the day went to a Frank Frazetta painting, that went for $1.7 million.

And don’t fret, anyone not in Chicago you can head to Heritage’s website for all the big listings.

ABC News and Marvel Comics are both part of parent company Disney.

From: https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Culture/supermans-appearance-batman-deadpool-art-part-10-million/story?id=55068788

Superman’s debut among $10 million in comics offered at auction – Chicago Sun

Chicagoans with a few hundred thousand dollars to spend on a comic book are in luck this week.

A live event at Heritage Auctions, 215 W. Ohio St., will feature roughly $10 million in vintage comics, comic art and memorabilia.

Among the 1,686 lots is DC’s Action Comics No. 1 — the 1938 comic that features the first appearance of Superman. It is expected to sell for at least $650,000. The auction is being held in four sessions; there will be three live auctions at Heritage — at noon and 2 p.m. Thursday and at noon on Friday — as well as an internet-only auction at noon Saturday.

“If you’re not a multimillionaire, this may be your chance to see $10 million worth of comics all in one place here in Chicago,” said Roberta Kramer, managing director of Heritage Auctions. She added that the first appearance of Superman was the “Holy Grail” of comics.

Kramer estimated the auction is set to be “quite possibly the most high-dollar comic book auction of it’s kind, ever.”

An original 1996 Charles Schulz Peanuts comic strip featuring Snoopy as a World War I flying ace along with his bird pal Woodstock from 1996 is expected to sell for $100,000. Also in the auction is an original 1990 painting by Frank Frazetta titled “Death Dealer 6.” As of Wednesday morning, absentee bidding for the painting already had reached $717,000.

“The Midwest loves comics and we’re very happy at Heritage to bring it here,” Kramer said.

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From: https://chicago.suntimes.com/entertainment/supermans-debut-action-comics_no-1-among-10-million-in-comics-offered-at-auction/

Superman’s debut among $10 million in comics offered at auction – Chicago Sun

Chicagoans with a few hundred thousand dollars to spend on a comic book are in luck this week.

A live event at Heritage Auctions, 215 W. Ohio St., will feature roughly $10 million in vintage comics, comic art and memorabilia.

Among the 1,686 lots is DC’s Action Comics No. 1 — the 1938 comic that features the first appearance of Superman. It is expected to sell for at least $650,000. The auction is being held in four sessions; there will be three live auctions at Heritage — at noon and 2 p.m. Thursday and at noon on Friday — as well as an internet-only auction at noon Saturday.

“If you’re not a multimillionaire, this may be your chance to see $10 million worth of comics all in one place here in Chicago,” said Roberta Kramer, managing director of Heritage Auctions. She added that the first appearance of Superman was the “Holy Grail” of comics.

Kramer estimated the auction is set to be “quite possibly the most high-dollar comic book auction of it’s kind, ever.”

An original 1996 Charles Schulz Peanuts comic strip featuring Snoopy as a World War I flying ace along with his bird pal Woodstock from 1996 is expected to sell for $100,000. Also in the auction is an original 1990 painting by Frank Frazetta titled “Death Dealer 6.” As of Wednesday morning, absentee bidding for the painting already had reached $717,000.

“The Midwest loves comics and we’re very happy at Heritage to bring it here,” Kramer said.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

From: https://chicago.suntimes.com/entertainment/supermans-debut-action-comics_no-1-among-10-million-in-comics-offered-at-auction/

Father and son have unfinished dino-business in this Superman Special exclusive

Image: DC Comics

One of the high points of Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason’s run on Superman is their “Return To Dinosaur Island” two-parter, which pays tribute to the late, great Darwyn Cooke by sending Superman and Superboy to Dinosaur Island. The story builds on plot points from Cooke’s classic DC: The New Frontier miniseries as the father-and-son duo meets Captain Storm, the last survivor of The Loser, a team of World War II soldiers who met their end on this island of prehistoric predators. Tomasi and Gleason’s run ends with next week’s Superman Special #1, and after wrapping up their big storylines in the main Superman title, they’re tying up some loose ends with a standalone tale that sends Clark and Jonathan Kent back to Dinosaur Island to save Captain Storm.

This exclusive preview of Superman Special #1, on sale May 16, sees Tomasi and Gleason reunite with artist Scott Godlewski and colorist Gabe Eltaeb, who worked with the writers on a Kent family road trip last year. This excerpt gives a handy rundown of past events for any readers who need a refresher, ending with a page of Superman in action before he heads off on a new adventure with his son. Eltaeb’s smooth coloring works very well with Godlewski’s clean line work, and the use of blue in these pages is especially effective for distinguishing Jonathan’s sullen mental state from his dad’s heroism.

This issue also features two stories by writers Ian Flynn and Mark Russell with art by Kaare Andrews and Bryan Hitch, bringing in some big-name talent for Tomasi and Gleason’s send-off. Gleason will be sticking around the Superman titles as the artist on Brian Michael Bendis’ Action Comics, but hopefully Bendis will bounce story ideas off his collaborator because Gleason’s run with Tomasi shows how much he brings to the table as a co-writer.

Cover by Jorge Jiménez and Alejandro Sanchez
Image: DC Comics
Image: DC Comics

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From: https://www.avclub.com/father-and-son-have-unfinished-dino-business-in-this-su-1825828322

As ‘Action Comics’ reaches No. 1000, here are 7 fun facts about Superman’s series

Superman first appeared in “Action Comics” No. 1 in 1938. And now, 80 years and 999 issues later, “Action Comics” No. 1,000 has arrived. That’s a lot of action!

DC Comics celebrated by expanding “Action Comics” No. 1,000 to 80 pages (available now), featuring 10 covers and 10 stories by an all-star lineup of writers and artists. While the first nine stories are celebratory, the 10th is revelatory, with superstar writer Brian Michael Bendis (fresh from rival Marvel Comics) beginning his run on the Man of Tomorrow by introducing a mystery about Krypton’s destruction. Bendis’ story will continue in a six-issue, weekly “Man of Steel” miniseries, followed by a relaunch of “Superman” and, of course, “Action Comics” No. 1001.

Here are seven fun facts to know and tell about “Action Comics”:

1. While Superman gets all the headlines, there was another important character introduced in “Action Comics” No. 1 who has had equal longevity: Lois Lane. Inspired by movie reporter Torchy Blaine, Lois was smart and career-oriented — a rare type of female character in the 1930s, whose presence inarguably contributed to the Man of Steel’s success.

2. “Action Comics” isn’t the first American title to reach 1,000 issues — that honor goes to Dell’s “Four Color,” which ran 1,365 issues from 1942 to 1965.

3. While “Action” is the first DC title to reach issue No. 1,000, it is not the publisher’s longest-running title. “Detective Comics” debuted in 1937, beating “Action” by a year. Batman debuted in 1939, giving “Detective” a star that would carry it to the present. But “Action” stole a march on its older brother, going weekly for roughly a year, beginning in May 1988. “Detective” will hit issue No. 1,000 in 2019.

4. The publisher of “Action Comics” No. 1 was officially named National Allied Publications. Most fans at the time, though, knew the company as “DC.” That was because those initials were on every National book’s cover, identifying it as being from the same publisher as the popular “Detective Comics.” In 1977, the company finally acknowledged reality and officially changed its name to DC Comics Inc.

5. Three other popular features joined “Action” over the years, and became somewhat identified with the title: Vigilante (a Western-themed hero), Congo Bill (a jungle explorer) and Tommy Tomorrow (a cop in the future).

6. In 1991, Clark Kent revealed his secret identity to Lois Lane. This revelation has waffled back and forth through various reboots, but by and large it has stuck. The current versions of Superman and Lois Lane are married, with a son named Jon.

7. In 2011, DC Comics rebooted their superhero universe, including Superman. Changes included renumbering “Action Comics,” with issue No. 904 followed by a new “Action Comics” No. 1. Fortunately, this decision was reversed when “Action Comics” (second series) No. 52 was followed with “Action Comics” No. 957 in 2016.

From: http://www.startribune.com/as-action-comics-reaches-no-1-000-here-are-7-fun-facts-about-superman-s-series/481948711/

GOD SQUAD: At 80, what Superman can teach about our struggle against evil



I love comic books. I was born in 1947 and they were my chosen form of fantasy escape. I still marvel (sorry for the pun) at the infinitely greater power of computer-generated imagery to affect me sitting in the movies compared to the meager colored drawings on pulpy paper that had to fulfill my imagination sitting at the counter of the Rexall Drugstore in Shorewood, Wis. I’d go for a cherry Coke and the latest issue of Superman comics. Perhaps those comic books were linked to today’s superhero movie franchises as a bridge between watching and reading. Reading lost the battle, and although explosions are bigger, our imaginations are certainly smaller. Fantasy and drama cannot be served in a pre-digested form. The story of the triumph of good over evil must have some role to play for each of us, and reading — or even listening on the radio — provides that interactive role for our imagination.

Anyway, I loved Superman comics, and because of my personal journey I think of Superman not merely in personal or cultural terms. I am most deeply engaged by the spiritual lessons of Superman. I am brought to these spiritual recollections of the Man of Steel because this past April 18 was the 80th anniversary of the first appearance of Superman in Action Comics issue No. 1 in 1938. “Supe” deserves a fitting birthday cake or at least a fitting sermon.

The blessing of Superman is that we all want a superhero. The curse of Superman is that superheroes make us morally lazy.

Evil in our world is so united and so powerful, and the forces of good can seem so weak and divided, that we can understandably despair of our ability to overcome it. So our fantasy life kicks in and we imagine that there might arrive someday a good person with super powers who will triumph over evil. That is Superman. Even his backstory mimics the story of Moses, who is the Bible’s superhero. Little Kal-El (which means the voice of God in Hebrew) is swaddled and sent in an interstellar version of Moses’ ark of bulrushes to Earth. Like Moses, Superman is endowed with special powers.

Here is where we see the difference between a superhero and a liberator. Superman changes nothing important and Moses changes everything by leading the people to freedom. However, there is a strong spiritual similarity between Moses and Superman. The people come to rely on the heroes’ powers rather than their own. They complain to Moses when their food and water runs out and miracles are hard to find during the desert wanderings. Superman appears during WWII, the greatest moral catastrophe of all time, and he can’t do a thing. He can’t overcome Hitler. He can’t destroy Auschwitz with his heat vision. He just fights Lex Luthor and assorted phantasmagorical villains from outer space.

The problem with super powers is that they teach us to sit on our behinds and wait to be saved. This is not empowering. This is morally debilitating. It works just so long as we keep the conflict contained to the realm of fantasy, but when we enter the conflict with evil in our real world, the only countervailing power that matters is our own collective courage. The struggle against evil is not a movie with special effects and it is not a comic book. The struggle against evil is fought out in our own divided hearts.

This is what Jesus knew and it is the distinctive moral legacy of Christianity. In the belief of Christians, Jesus is neither a superhero nor liberator. Jesus is a savior. His work is to save people from sin, which is the evil that corrodes their own souls. The struggle is not resolved by anything that happens in this world. That struggle is resolved in the next world, where evil vanishes like smoke. The arc from superhero to liberator to savior reflects our eternal struggle to be free.

And finally, a word about flying. Of all Superman’s wide array of super powers, the only one I cared about was his ability to fly. As a kid I remember finishing a Superman comic and then just stretching out face down on my bed with my arms outstretched, pretending to fly. I may have even prayed an unfortunate child’s prayer, “God just let me fly a little. Just around my room would be OK with me or maybe in front of the girl I like who does not even know I exist.” It did not work … until I learned to fly with my words.

Happy 80th birthday, Supe! I’m glad you appeared nine years before me. I don’t think I could have gone nine years without you.


Send ALL QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS to The God Squad via email at godsquadquestion@aol.com. Rabbi Gellman is the author of several books, including “Religion for Dummies,” co-written with Fr. Tom Hartman.

From: https://www.nhregister.com/religion/article/GOD-SQUAD-At-80-what-Superman-can-teach-about-12879493.php

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