Mysterious REBIRTH Developments Kick Off ‘Superman Reborn …

Superman art

Credit: Patrick Gleason/Mick Gray (DC Comics)
Credit: DC Comics

Superman #18, the first issue of DC’s much-anticipated “Superman Reborn” crossover event delivered plenty of scenes related to the ongoing “Rebirth” mysteries, although few answers so far.

Spoilers ahead.

In the first scene of this week’s Superman #18, someone escapes Mr. Oz’s lair (wherever it may be), although readers aren’t shown who the escapee is. Instead, the comic book portrays three of Oz’s prisoners – Doomsday, Prophecy, and Tim Drake – reacting with joy because, as Tim says, “Someone got out!”

Readers are shown the structure where this mysterious escapee was once held by Mr. Oz. It’s an enormous, obelisk-shaped structure, and the inside has writing and drawings on the wall that reveal the prisoner believed Superman would save him/her. Included among drawings of the Superman symbol and the hero himself was the phrase, “Superman, where are you?”

Credit: Patrick Gleason/Mick Gray (DC Comics)

Over in their Hamilton County home, Superman, Lois, and their son Jon (who now hide under the surname “Smith”) are celebrating the couple’s anniversary. But a knock on the door reveals that someone has left a photo album on the doorstep.

The one who knocked on the door appears to be the other Clark Kent – the mysterious human Clark who’s been in Action Comics since “Rebirth” began. Although he briefly stops to interact with Krypto (saying, “It’s me, boy” but not getting a friendly response), he disappears before Superman can find him. Hmmmm… was this the human Clark? Or someone else?

The photo albums says “The Kents” on the cover – yep, a revelation that blows their cover. And inside are pictures of Clark Kent’s life in the post-Crisis life, before “New 52.”

Credit: Patrick Gleason/Mick Gray (DC Comics)
Credit: Patrick Gleason/Mick Gray (DC Comics)

“I don’t understand,” Superman says, knowing that nobody in the current DCU should have those photos. And Jon notices that he’s not in any of the photos.

But the family can’t think about the pictures for too long, because the house is suddenly engulfed in some type of blue flame – but instead of burning anything, it’s “like it’s being erased,” according to Superman.

Not only is the house being erased, but now Jon is covered in the blue flames as well. Is Jon being erased?

Superman grabs his son, but Jon blinks out of existence and appears to be teleported to the basement. Then when Superman reaches for him again, he is transported to the second floor of the house.

Superman wraps Jon in his cape and flies him out of the house. But it does no good. Jon is covered in the blue flames. “Don’t let me go, Dad,” Jon says. Crying, Superman says, “I won’t, I won’t, son. Never.”

In a heartbreaking scene, Lois and Clark are unable to stop their son from disappearing. With their house gone and the picture album’s photos also becoming blank, Lois says, “Gone…everything gone. We’ve lost the only thing that mattered. We’ve lost our son, Clark.”

Credit: Patrick Gleason/Mick Gray (DC Comics)

“We didn’t lose him, Lois,” Superman says on the issue’s final page. “We didn’t lose Jon. That Clark Kent took him. And we’re going to make him give Jon back.”

Readers have been promised that “Superman Reborn” will reveal answers about the mysterious Mr. Oz, who has been showing up in various DC books – particularly those connected with Superman – since before the beginning of “Rebirth.” Many also suspect that Mr. Oz is actually Ozymandias from Watchmen, since characters from that legendary, alternate universe mini-series are manipulating the DC timeline, according to revelations in May 2016’s DC Universe: Rebirth #1.

The blue flames may also be related to scenes from the beginning of “Rebirth.” In the first few pages of “Rebirth”‘s Superman #1 in June, the post-Crisis Superman took a moment to visit the grave of the recently deceased “New 52” Superman. When the older hero touched the ground above his dead counterpart’s body, a glowing blue handprint formed in the grass. The thought box associated with the scene indicated that the blue glow was connected to Mr. Oz’s statement in DC Universe: Rebirth #1 that Superman is not what he seems.

From: http://www.newsarama.com/33387-mysterious-rebirth-developments-kick-off-superman-reborn-superman-18-spoilers.html

ComicsAlliance’s Official ‘Superman Reborn’ Betting Odds

Patrick Zircher, Arif Prianto  Rob Leigh / DC Comics
Patrick Zircher, Arif Prianto Rob Leigh / DC Comics

 

So here’s the short version if you haven’t been keeping up: As The New 52 era came to a close and DC Rebirth began, the version of Superman that we’d been following for the past 5 years was apparently killed, leaving a void that would be filled by his predecessor from the previous DC continuity. See, the pre-52 Superman — you know, the one who come to Earth from Krypton in John Byrne’Man of Steel and fought Doomsday back in 1994 — managed to survive the destruction of his universe due to the events of Convergence, spending a year in the Bottle City of Metropolis, having a kid with Lois Lane, and then somehow winding up in the current DC Continuity where he lived a quiet life on a farm until he was needed.

If it sounds complicated, that’s because it is, but that also makes it one of the most compelling mysteries in superhero comics right now. And there’s one additional wrench in the works: Clark Kent, a mild mannered reporter for a great metropolitan newspaper who exists completely separately from Superman. Now, as “Superman Reborn” is set to kick off in this week’s Superman #18, we’re about to get the answer to one of DC’s most compelling questions: Who the heck is Clark Kent?!

So let’s run down the candidates with a bit of information sent over by DC:

 

Who Is Clark Kent, DC Comics
Exclusive back-matter from Superman #18, DC Comics

 

So here, as is tradition at ComicsAlliance, are your Official Betting Odds for the big reveal:

  • Bizarro – You’d think an imperfect duplicate of Superman would have a pretty easy time acting as a duplicate of Clark Kent, but the keyword here is “Duplicate.” Since he hasn’t been literally thrown out of the Planet by an irate Perry White, it’s safe to say that “Clark” hasn’t shown Bizarro’s traditionally poor grasp of grammar and verb conjugation. Still, it might am be elaborate hoax that everyone expect. 10 to 1 
  • New 52 Superman – Remember when I said Superman apparently died? Well, we didn’t actually see it, and you know the rule about that. Casual Fridays Superman ended up being a solid take on the character, and since he spent so much time without his powers (and switching secret identities) in his five-year run, being a Secret Clark wouldn’t be out of character for him at all. 4 to 1
  • Mr. Mxyzptlk – The reality warping imp from the Fifth Dimension has gone to some pretty extreme lengths in the past to prank Superman — and occasionally to try to destroy him and everything he loves — and this wouldn’t be the first time we’ve seen him disguise himself as Clark Kent and/or Superman for laughs. The thing is, after the battle against Vyndktvx, the 5th Dimension hasn’t been featured in a whole lot of stories, and bringing back Superman’s goofiest enemy for such a big reveal seems pretty unlikely. 12 to 1
  • The Eradicator – You know what’s been coming back from the ’90s in the Superman books? Everything! Doomsday! Post-Crisis Superman! Dan Jugerns! It’s a full-on invasion from the Death of Superman saga, and since the Eradicator fooled everyone before, it makes a lot of sense that he’d be able to fool them again. 3 to 1
  • Martian Manhunter – Shapeshifting, telepathy, and he hasn’t been seen much since the end of his last solo series — which, I remind you, was all about how he got his powers with Dark Martian Blood Magic. Compared to that, spending a year as Clark Kent seems pretty tame. 8 to 1
  • Magog – I hadn’t even considered this until DC brought it up, but y’all. For real. They love referencing Kingdom Come so much5 to 1
  • Superboy Prime – He’s not listed on the official list of candidates, but that doesn’t mean that they’re not just trying to swerve us with the big reveal. As you might remember, Superboy Prime was a huge villain in the previous version of the DC Universe, and hasn’t been seen for a while — and if they prison they locked him up in doesn’t exist anymore, who’s to say he’s not out there running free? Considering he looks just like Superman, is literally named Clark Kent, has an uncanny ability to survive reboots and is often motivated by what he sees as “fixing” complicated continuity, he’s not just a good candidate, he’s actually the most likely candidate2 to 1

The truth is, we here at ComicsAlliance actually know who it is already, but we’re not saying just yet. So place your bets, catch the start of “Superman Reborn,” and find out for sure right here at ComicsAlliance in the coming weeks!

 

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From: http://comicsalliance.com/who-is-clark-kent-superman-reborn-odds/

The Truth About the Kents Begins to Be Revealed in SUPERMAN …

One of the highlights of DC Rebirth over the past year has been the return of a version of the Man of Steel that everyone can get behind in the pages of Action Comics and Superman, one in stark contrast to the Kal-El who launched  The New 52 five years ago. That Superman was a broody loner who didn’t seem to play well with others, wasn’t dating or married to Lois Lane, and wore an armored costume. Last year that Superman died, and the Superman from before Flashpoint returned, without the silly armor, married to Lois Lane, and with a young son named Jonathan Kent. (The red underwear is still gone. But hey, you can’t have everything.)

The assumption has been that the Kent family comes from a parallel universe, but a mysterious figure named Mr. Oz has told the Kents that they are not what they believe themselves to be. Oh, and there has been a mysterious third Clark Kent, who doesn’t seem to remember being Superman and doesn’t have powers. Now the truth of the Kent family, the dearly departed New 52 Superman, and the mysterious third Clark are finally going to be revealed in a new storyline called Superman Reborn. The four part crossover between the Super-titles (the first since Rebirth began) begins in Superman #18, and continues into Action Comics #975, Superman #19, and concludes in Action Comics #976.

You can check out our exclusive extended preview of the first ten pages of Superman #18  in our gallery below!

Publisher: DC Comics
Writer: Peter Tomasi, Patrick Gleason
Artists: Mick Gray, Patrick Gleason
Cover Artists: Patrick Gleason and Mick Gray, Gary Frank (Variant)

Here’s the official synopsis:

“SUPERMAN REBORN” part one! In DC UNIVERSE: REBIRTH #1, the enigmatic Mr. Oz told this Superman, “You and your family are not what you believe you are. And neither was the fallen Superman.” Now, in the first Rebirth crossover between SUPERMAN and ACTION COMICS, the shocking truth behind Oz’s words is revealed. It begins with one of Oz’s prisoners escaping, and ends in a tragic moment for Lois and Superman.”

Superman #18  is due to hit stores on Wednesday, March 1.

Are you stoked to find out the truth about the return of the classic Superman and his family? Let us know what you think down below in the comments.

Images: DC Comics

From: http://nerdist.com/the-truth-about-the-kents-begins-to-be-revealed-in-superman-18-exclusive-preview/

The Truth About the Kents Begins to Be Revealed in SUPERMAN #18 (Exclusive Preview)

One of the highlights of DC Rebirth over the past year has been the return of a version of the Man of Steel that everyone can get behind in the pages of Action Comics and Superman, one in stark contrast to the Kal-El who launched  The New 52 five years ago. That Superman was a broody loner who didn’t seem to play well with others, wasn’t dating or married to Lois Lane, and wore an armored costume. Last year that Superman died, and the Superman from before Flashpoint returned, without the silly armor, married to Lois Lane, and with a young son named Jonathan Kent. (The red underwear is still gone. But hey, you can’t have everything.)

The assumption has been that the Kent family comes from a parallel universe, but a mysterious figure named Mr. Oz has told the Kents that they are not what they believe themselves to be. Oh, and there has been a mysterious third Clark Kent, who doesn’t seem to remember being Superman and doesn’t have powers. Now the truth of the Kent family, the dearly departed New 52 Superman, and the mysterious third Clark are finally going to be revealed in a new storyline called Superman Reborn. The four part crossover between the Super-titles (the first since Rebirth began) begins in Superman #18, and continues into Action Comics #975, Superman #19, and concludes in Action Comics #976.

You can check out our exclusive extended preview of the first ten pages of Superman #18  in our gallery below!

Publisher: DC Comics
Writer: Peter Tomasi, Patrick Gleason
Artists: Mick Gray, Patrick Gleason
Cover Artists: Patrick Gleason and Mick Gray, Gary Frank (Variant)

Here’s the official synopsis:

“SUPERMAN REBORN” part one! In DC UNIVERSE: REBIRTH #1, the enigmatic Mr. Oz told this Superman, “You and your family are not what you believe you are. And neither was the fallen Superman.” Now, in the first Rebirth crossover between SUPERMAN and ACTION COMICS, the shocking truth behind Oz’s words is revealed. It begins with one of Oz’s prisoners escaping, and ends in a tragic moment for Lois and Superman.”

Superman #18  is due to hit stores on Wednesday, March 1.

Are you stoked to find out the truth about the return of the classic Superman and his family? Let us know what you think down below in the comments.

Images: DC Comics

From: http://nerdist.com/the-truth-about-the-kents-begins-to-be-revealed-in-superman-18-exclusive-preview/

The DC Comics film has been given a Razzie Award

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice has been named worst remake at the not-so-prestigious Razzie Awards.

British actor Henry Cavill and co-star Ben Affleck won the gong for worst screen combo in the DC Comics film.

It beat the likes of Zoolander No. 2, the star-studded follow-up to 2001’s Zoolander, which collected one award despite nine nominations.

The Razzies are the opposite of the Oscars, with awards for being the worst.

Ben Affleck and Henry Cavill

Hillary’s America: The Secret History Of The Democratic Party also collected four prizes at the 37th Annual Golden Raspberry Awards.

The product of political commentator, Dinesh D’Souza, it was named worst picture and the woman who plays Ms Clinton collected worst actress.

D’Souza himself wasn’t left out as he picked up two Razzies for worst actor and worst director.

In a recorded message, D’Souza thanked the academy saying: “Being dissed by you guys, this is absolutely fantastic.

“My audience loves the fact that you hate me.”

He added: “The reason you are giving it to me is because you’re very upset Trump won.

“You’ve never got over it, you probably never will.”

Find us on Instagram at BBCNewsbeat and follow us on Snapchat, search for bbc_newsbeat

From: http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/39090400/the-dc-comics-film-has-been-given-a-razzie-award

Fantastic Five: Weird Superman Stories – ComicsAlliance

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If there’s one thing we’ve learned from our years on the Internet, it’s that there’s no aspect of comics that can’t be broken down and quantified in a single definitive list, preferably in amounts of five or ten. And since there’s no more definitive authority than ComicsAlliance, we’re taking it upon ourselves to compile Top Five lists of everything you could ever want to know about comics.

This week we’re counting down five of the weirdest stories in Superman history. But let’s be honest: there have been thousands of stories starring the Man of Steel since his debut in 1983, and a ton of them are incredibly weird. I could have easily made a top fifty list just from stories published between 1958 and 1962. Instead, with this list I tried to spread the weird love around a little bit and hit a story from five different eras of Superman history and not just five sublimations of Mort Weisinger’s neuroses from the Silver Age. If you like this video and would like to see more weird Superman stuff, maybe leave a comment below.

Show notes:

  • If you like weird old Superman, you should check out Jon Morris’s blog The Chronological Superman, which examines every piece of Superman media in chronological order.
  • You can read the specific story referenced in number five here, but you should probably start here.
  • You can see a decade-younger Chris Sims write about the story in number four at greater length than I get into here.
  • I talk more about the villain from the number three story in this other installment of Fantastic Five, or read Jon Morris talking about the story here.
  • You can read the story in second place digitally here, or read Chris Sims talk more about it here.
  • The number one story is not currently in print, but you can buy a used copy super cheap here, or you can read Jon Morris talking about it here.

 

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From: http://comicsalliance.com/weirdest-superman-stories/

Superman goes super nuts in new Injustice 2 story trailer

And boo-yah? Cyborg is back

As Injustice 2‘s May release draws closer, expect NetherRealm to double down on all of the cool trailers and reveals. The newest trailer — the first part in a series called “Shattered Alliances” — focuses on Superman and a bit of the sequel’s story. I finally understand the complaint about the title’s mo-cap animation as Superman’s face does seem a bit janky. It’s a bold move for a fighting game, so pulling it off successfully is going to make or break Injustice 2

In other highlights, Cyborg is stealthily confirmed. Given his role in the first game (and upcoming Justice League movie) he was pretty much a given. I do hope he differs enough from the already tech heavy Blue Beetle’s move set, however. 

Injustice 2 releases on May 16th for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One 


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From: https://www.destructoid.com/superman-goes-super-nuts-in-new-injustice-2-story-trailer-420423.phtml

Fantastic Five: Weird Superman Stories

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If there’s one thing we’ve learned from our years on the Internet, it’s that there’s no aspect of comics that can’t be broken down and quantified in a single definitive list, preferably in amounts of five or ten. And since there’s no more definitive authority than ComicsAlliance, we’re taking it upon ourselves to compile Top Five lists of everything you could ever want to know about comics.

This week we’re counting down five of the weirdest stories in Superman history. But let’s be honest: there have been thousands of stories starring the Man of Steel since his debut in 1983, and a ton of them are incredibly weird. I could have easily made a top fifty list just from stories published between 1958 and 1962. Instead, with this list I tried to spread the weird love around a little bit and hit a story from five different eras of Superman history and not just five sublimations of Mort Weisinger’s neuroses from the Silver Age. If you like this video and would like to see more weird Superman stuff, maybe leave a comment below.

Show notes:

  • If you like weird old Superman, you should check out Jon Morris’s blog The Chronological Superman, which examines every piece of Superman media in chronological order.
  • You can read the specific story referenced in number five here, but you should probably start here.
  • You can see a decade-younger Chris Sims write about the story in number four at greater length than I get into here.
  • I talk more about the villain from the number three story in this other installment of Fantastic Five, or read Jon Morris talking about the story here.
  • You can read the story in second place digitally here, or read Chris Sims talk more about it here.
  • The number one story is not currently in print, but you can buy a used copy super cheap here, or you can read Jon Morris talking about it here.

 

Check Out More Fantastic Five Episodes

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From: http://comicsalliance.com/weirdest-superman-stories/

Superman – Action Comics Vol. 1: Path Of Doom Review

Superman - Action Comics Vol. 1: Path Of Doom Review

This review is based off a volume that collects Action Comics #957-962.

There are many reasons why Action Comics is one of my favorite titles that DC currently publishes – and Path of Doom illustrates them all beautifully. Not only does it include Superman and all the essential supporting characters – Lois Lane, Jimmy Olsen and Lex Luthor, for starters – but it also features some of the most compelling mysteries of the young Rebirth era, a quality many may not be aware of and something that will be touched on shortly.

But really, it should come as no surprise that this series is a fine read. I mean, if Dan Jurgens was born to write for any character, it’s certainly Big Blue. Having crafted tales chronicling the Man of Tomorrow’s adventures for the past few decades, you would think he’d run out of ideas by now, but nothing could be further from the truth.

Seeing as how Jurgens opted to stick to writing, lest he destroy his hands attempting to make the deadlines that come with a twice-monthly shipping schedule, he’s joined by an impressive cadre of artists. Personally, I love the efforts put forth by Patrick Zircher and Tyler Kirkham, as they’re incredibly textured and detailed. And, in case you’re wondering, I also enjoyed Stephen Segovia’s contributions as well, although I couldn’t help but notice that his renditions of Superman and Lex kind of looked a bit younger than they should have in some panels. On the positive side, nobody’s style here is too drastic of a departure from their colleagues’, so the transitions aren’t jarring in a visual sense.

Superman - Action Comics Vol. 1: Path Of Doom ReviewSuperman - Action Comics Vol. 1: Path Of Doom ReviewSuperman - Action Comics Vol. 1: Path Of Doom ReviewSuperman - Action Comics Vol. 1: Path Of Doom ReviewSuperman - Action Comics Vol. 1: Path Of Doom ReviewSuperman - Action Comics Vol. 1: Path Of Doom Review

Click to zoom Superman - Action Comics Vol. 1: Path Of Doom Review

As I intimated earlier, there’s a boatload of intrigue to be found in this book: Mr. Oz, whom I and many others theorize to be Watchmen’s Ozymandias, making moves from the shadows; a mysterious “Clark Kent” who isn’t superpowered, confounding the major players and readers alike; and a Lex Luthor who has assumed the mantle of the recently deceased New 52 Superman, forcing the pre-Flashpoint version to step into the daylight.

Speaking of which, that leads to a most interesting dynamic: Seeing Superman and Lex Luthor forced to work side by side in order to thwart the abominable threat that is Doomsday. Although both must endure some awkward, heated conversations, it’s we the readers who win, even if their arguments do prove circular as time goes on.

Make no mistake, just because I thoroughly dig this series doesn’t mean it’s without its faults. A criticism that can be aimed at the fight with Doomsday is that it goes on for too long. I remember when I was originally reading this arc as the issues were being individually released, I kept thinking to myself, “They’re still fighting Doomsday” with each passing installment. But to its credit, Path of Doom does come across better in a contained trade paperback. Still, the seemingly never-ending fisticuffs overstay their welcome more than a bit, even if Wonder Woman does eventually get involved.

If you’re hoping to see Clark’s family life, I will say you do get that here, but not in the way you would over in Superman. Whereas that title is more domestic and bucolic, Action Comics is more about Metropolis. So, while Lois and Jon are still core characters in this tale, don’t count on seeing Jon’s journey to becoming Superboy being chronicled; that’s Peter J. Tomasi’s job. In other words, this is more of a broad story as opposed to being intimate or overly introspective – but don’t confuse that with thinking there’s no heart, because it’s there in spades.

Something that really surprised me when it came to Wonder Woman’s involvement here that there wasn’t as much emotion on her end as there was more so selfless heroism. Knowing that she was romantically linked to New 52 Superman could’ve allowed Jurgens to really flex his writing muscles by showing her reaction to having to work with her former beau’s doppelganger, but she pretty much took it in stride. I’m well aware this was touched on in other titles such as Trinity, but a few breathers from what amounted to be non-stop action from start to finish would have been appreciated.

Through and through, Superman – Action Comics Vol. 1: Path of Doom feels like reading an extended episode of Superman: The Animated Series. Like I said, it has the characters you want to see and is filled to the brim with, well, action. Rest assured that the closing pages meet their goal and will have you returning for a second helping when the next volume hits bookstores.

From: http://wegotthiscovered.com/comicbooks/superman-action-comics-vol-1-path-doom-review/

From the archives : President’s Day and comic books

Over the years many characters from both the DC and Marvel Universes have either run or held the high office of the Presidency.some of which I have discussed in past blog posts:

 

From Presidential candidates in comic books

Superman

The Man of Steel has held the highest office in the land a few times.

The first instance is Superman #119 (Vol. 1, 1939) when Jimmy dreams that Superman becomes President.

It happened again in the 90s during the Armageddon 2001 event when Waverider was trying to figure out the identity of the villain Monarch, who destroyed Waverider’s own time.

In this timeline, Pa Kent is crushed by a tractor and dies in 1991. Soon, the farm is put up for sale and Ma moves in with Lois and Clark, who are preparing to get married. Clark’s boyhood friend Pete Ross decides to run for the presidency and asks Clark to come on the team as campaign manager.

During a failed attempt to assassinate Pete, Clark reveals to the world he is Superman as he was saving Pete’s life.

Pete pulls through but asks Clark/Superman to run in his place. If you’ve read the title of this post, you know his answer. But it isn’t as easy as all that, because his opponents fight his nomination on the basis that he isn’t American-born, which of course they work around claiming Clark was born in an artificial womb in a Kansas wheatfield (I am sure Lex asked for a birth certificate to be produced)

Once elected, Superman gets some lost gold from the ocean bed with Aquaman’s help to help pay down the debt, personally frees hostages, plants a million new trees, turns an old disused supervillain lairs in Gotham into affordable housing, and put solar collectors in space to provide cheap energy for the world and of course brings about world world peace.

Turns out this was just a big “What if?” story and none of it really happens.

In the New52 run of Action #9, written by Grant Morrison, we are introduced to Calvin Ellis, who is the Superman of Earth-23 and the President of the United States of America, fights for truth, justice and equality. He also returns in Multiversity and is the leader of Justice League Incarnate which protects the DC Multiverse.

 

Prez: The First Teen President (DC Comics)

Prez: First Teen President followed the adventures of a teenage boy whose election had been made possible by a Constitutional amendment lowering the age of eligibility to accommodate the then-influential youth culture of the baby boom was created and appeared in the four-issue comic series in 1973 – 1974 by writer Joe Simon and artist Jerry Grandenetti.

The series follows Prez Rickard, nicknamed ‘Prez’ by his mother Martha, in the hope of his election to the Presidency.

Prez is originally tapped by Boss Smiley as a front for shady businessman Boss Smiley (a political boss with a smiley face) to run for United States Senator; after becoming a local hero afer synchronizing the clocks of his town of Steadfast. After being elected Senator Prez learns of Boss SMiley’s true intentions, which causes Prez vow to fight Boss Smiley by running for President, thanks to the fact that Congress lowered the age requirement and an uprising in the youth vote.

Once in office Prez’s short-lived series involved him fighting legless vampires, a right-wing militia led by the great-great-great-great-great-grandnephew of George Washington, his arch nemisis “Boss Smiley”, and evil chess players…only in the 70s would this be possible.

The series was a precursor to the DC Implosion of the late 70s although the character would continue to make the occasional cameo.

The character would later be rebooted during the DCYou run before Rebirth written by Mark Russell and drawn by Ben Caldwell.

This time the 6 issue mini series featured a teenage girl named Beth Ross who is elected president via Twitter,in the year 2036, after a video of her getting her hair caught in a corndog fryer goes viral.

From Politics in Comics :

Lex Luthor

In 2000, in the lead up to the most contentious election in history, DC Comics opted to run Lex Luthor, mad scientist, business tycoon, and constant throne in Superman’s side, for president instead of George W. Bush. Superman’s arch-villain ended up winning the Presidency, which caused all sorts of strife for heroes across the DC Universe with the citizens in the country unable to see Luthor for the villain that he truly was. Superman and Batman went to work relentlessly trying to remove him from office since the electorate and Congress were unable to remove him from office. Eventually they were able to expose him to the world as the villain he was and he fled the country in disgrace but there were some interesting stories along the way.

Transmetropolitan

Transmetropolitan is a cyberpunk comic book series written by Warren Ellis with art by Darick Robertson and published by DC Comics

The comic chronicles the battles of Spider Jerusalem, an infamous gonzo journalist and homage to Hunter S. Thompson, who lives in “The City.” Spider Jerusalem has dedicated himself to fighting the corruption and abuse of power of two successive United States presidents; The Beast and The Smiler. Along with his “filthy assistants” he strives to keep their world from turning more dystopian than it already is while dealing with spiderthe struggles of fame and power, brought about due to the popularity of his articles.

The Beast
The current president when the series begins and is a two-term president despised by Spider for his political tactics and condescending attitude toward the population. Spider gives him the nickname based from his mental picture of the man, “a big black animal squatting in the heart of America…the thing in us that votes to *^$ other people in the gall bladder, the lizard brain that says nothing but eat-kill-hump-s—*” and is portrayed as a Richard Nixon-esque President. The Beast possesses something of a superiority complex and has few qualms with punishing districts which don’t support him. Spider repeatedly accused The Beast of being a power-hungry politician who had no real beliefs and no interest in actually doing the job required of him. In an interview Spider finds out The Beast simply believes in “getting through the day,” doing the bare minimum required of him in order to ensure that the country continues to run and that at least the bare majority of the population survives.

The Smiler
The Smiler, whose real name is Gary Callahan, is the presidential candidate who is elected at the end of the first story arc of the comic. He is given the nickname for his wide, rigid, nearly perpetual grin, and gains Spider’s grudging support, until he proves to be far more corrupt and dangerous than The Beast, and only wants to be President in order to control and oppress people,. The Smiler goes so far as to send assassins after him, have him fired from The Word (the paper he writes for). Since The Smiler has no qualms about killing anyone whose death will help him gain or keep power, Transmetropolitan is a one-of-a-kind mix of extreme sci-fi, insane humor, hard politics, and even harder violence make it a great read. Warren Ellis uses Transmetropolitan as a soap box commentary on our generation by touching everything from anthropomorphism to religion to politics with a cheery sense of dread and disgust messages which make the series a classic.

 

The Beast The Smiler


Here are some new entries of more Presidents from comic books, some good and some bad:

Doctor DoomDoom 2099

When present-day Victor Von Doom is resurrected decades later, he goes on quite the tear. Not satisfied with cartoonish bids for power; this quest for world domination was filled with cold, calculated murder.

Step one, take back his own throne, then moved on to steal the largely ceremonial role of the POTUS. You see, when the corporations (like what will happen in the next four years)take over there won’t be much need for a president anymore. So much so they didn’t even think to dismantle the position’s official power.

Doom, as you might expect, noticed the error. He ousted the U.S. senate (by killing them), and convinced the current presidential puppet to step down (by killing himself).

Murder aside, he was a pretty decent head of state, and a stellar delegator.
His impact on other 2099 titles was felt as he roped their various stars into his administrations cabinet:

Doom putsthe X-Men in charge of Halo City, a burg where humans and mutants lived in peace; makes future Spider-Man Miguel O’Hara the Minister of Superhuman Affairs, and the Punisher 2099 becomes Minister of Punishment, as well as the head of SHIELD.

Naturally, the former corporate bigwigs try to remove him, and manage to do just that for a time. Doom being Doom, however, survives the coup and retaliates. Not by getting re-elected, but by disintegrating the lot of them with nano bots … Take that Electorial College.

Captain America (Steve Rogers)

Sure they tried to get him to run in the 616 Universe but it in the Ultimate Universe he actually held the office after he was elected to lead the shattered country during Divided We Fall storyline, which was basically the Ultimate line’s bombastic version of Civil War.

And last but not least…

Richard Nixon

You read that right, Richard Nixon aka “Tricky Dick.”

Quite a lot of real-life presidents have made their way into comics over the years, but Richard Nixon seems to top the crop when it comes to presidents in comic books. Maybe it is because he’s just that a good of a villain.

With appearances in both DC and Marvel, he has appeared in Superman, Captain America, Watchmen, Neil Gaiman’s Sandman, SHIELD, and Star Trek.

You can’t just can’t escape him.

Sometimes that’s a good thing! For the sake of the story, especially when Nixon happens to be a Skrull

His most well-known comic book appearance is from Watchmen. In the Alan Moore/Dave Gibbons classic, Mr. Watergate is not only a barometer for the state of a post-superhero United States, but has an active role in shaping the world into its wacky, 80s vision of American Exceptionalism

Nixon enlists Dr. Manhattan and The Comedian to win the Vietnam War making him Dick just about the most popular president in history. So popular, in fact, that he gets the 22nd Amendment repealed whach allows him to run for and win a third term in office.

And the Watergate Scandal wasn’t much of a scandal that would put a damper on everything when Your personal assassin is The Comedian and you have him murder journalists Woodward and Bernstein and JFK.

Sure that’s bad but his worst act of villiany…

Causing Captain America to doubt his namesake. Nixon’s betrayal was so great that Steve Rogers ditched his old costume and replaced it with an… ill-advised v-neck jumper, re-introducing himself as the new hero “Nomad.”

Back Wednesday

From: http://blog.timesunion.com/comicbooks/from-the-archives-presidents-day-and-comic-books/6929/

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