Captain Comics: The many iterations of Captain Marvel

It’s time to discuss Captains Marvel.

Yes, Captain Marvel in the plural — because there have been a lot of them. Ironically, the character starring in “Shazam,” premiering April 5, started out as a Captain Marvel. And the character starring in “Captain Marvel,” premiering March 8, did not.

But given those movies, the long strange history of the name “Captain Marvel” must be addressed. And it’s a doozy.

The Shazam guy, it should be noted, was the first, original Captain Marvel. Debuting in “Whiz Comics” No. 2 (1939), from Fawcett Comics, young orphan Billy Batson was able to turn into the adult, super-powered Captain Marvel by saying a magic word: “Shazam,” the name of the wizard who gave him his powers.

Those powers included flight, super-strength and invulnerability — which he shared with another famed superhero, Superman. And Billy Batson became a journalist (a radio reporter), an element he shared with Clark Kent. The publishers of Superman, the forerunners of today’s DC Comics, decided that was enough to sue “The World’s Mightiest Mortal” for copyright infringement.

The lawsuit dragged on into the 1950s, and eventually Fawcett threw in the towel. They got out of the comic book biz altogether in 1953.

Without anybody protecting it, the trademark for the name “Captain Marvel” fell into public domain. Anybody could use it. And the first company to do so was a tiny firm called M.F. Enterprises.

The new Captain Marvel launched in his own eponymous title in 1966. It only lasted four issues, though, because the whole concept was utterly terrible.

For one thing, he wasn’t a he — he was an it. The new Captain Marvel was an alien robot, sent to Earth to escape the nuclear destruction of his home world. He had jet boots and laser eyes, but that wasn’t his main, or most memorable, super-power.

That would be his ability to break apart into six discrete parts by yelling the word “Split!” His arms, legs and head would separate from his torso, and all those parts would go into battle separately.

Yeah. The awful image that just crossed your mind is entirely accurate. Somebody actually thought that was a good idea.

As noted, though, the M.F. Enterprises Captain Marvel didn’t last long. But maybe it lasted long enough to alert Marvel Comics that the name “Captain Marvel” was up for grabs. And if you’re “Marvel Comics,” wouldn’t you want that name?

And they got it. According to the book “Slugfest,” Marvel actually nudged M.F. Enterprises to get out of the Captain Marvel business, and threw in a $4,500 sweetener.

And lo, a Marvel Captain Marvel was born. An anthology title, “Marvel Super-Heroes,” introduced Captain Mar-Vell in 1967. A spy for the Kree Empire, Mar-Vell was assigned to Earth, specifically to Cape Canaveral, where he took the disguise of dead rocket scientist Walter Lawson.

Unfortunately for Mar-Vell, Lawson had a criminal past, and he immediately became an object of suspicion for the Cape’s tough head of security, USAF Captain Carol Danvers. More on her, anon.

Needless to say, Mar-Vell didn’t stay a bad guy for long; he came to love Earth and began fighting for her in his green-and-white Kree uniform, which we gullible Earthlings assumed to be a superhero costume. Going by the name Captain Marvel — a corruption of his actual name and rank — Mar-Vell graduated to his own series, where he fought aliens, met Avengers and was given super-powers by mysterious cosmic entities.

Oh, wait, that last part probably deserves explanation. A cosmic intelligence named “Zo” informed Mar-Vell that he was destined to be the “balance” of the universe, and in concert with the Supreme Intelligence — an amorphous blob of minds that leads the Kree — remade Mar-Vell. He gained flight, super-strength, great resistance to injury and “cosmic awareness,” a sort of universal clairvoyance or precognition.

He also gained a snappy red, blue and gold super-suit — and his own Billy Batson, sort of. Writer Roy Thomas tipped his hat to the original Captain Marvel by sending the new version to the Negative Zone, where he could only be freed when ubiquitous sidekick Rick Jones changed places with him. Instead of yelling “Shazam,” teenage Jones would clang together cosmic wrist jewelry called Nega-Bands — “Ktang!” — and be replaced by the adult Mar-Vell. Mar-Vell could reverse the swap by ktanging his own Nega-Bands together.

But all good things must come to an end, they say, and Mar-Vell did as well. In a shocking twist, he died of cancer, in the aptly-named “Death of Captain Marvel” graphic novel (1981). Which freed up the name “Captain Marvel” again.

Marvel wasn’t about to let it get away, especially since DC Comics had acquired the original Captain Marvel. Unable to use the name on covers due to Marvel’s trademark rights, DC had begun publishing the first Captain Marvel in all his glory in a series titled “Shazam” in 1973.

So Marvel created another Captain Marvel in 1982: Monica Rambeau, a police lieutenant in the New Orleans harbor patrol. Able to transform herself into any kind of energy, Rambeau has been poorly used in comics, ceding the name Captain Marvel in the ‘90s and taking in succession the names Photon, Pulsar and Spectrum before more or less fading into comic book limbo. (A character named Monica Rambeau will appear in the “Captain Marvel” movie, so she’s got that going for her.)

And to whom did Monica cede the legendary name? Why Genis-Vell, Mar-Vell’s formerly unknown biological son. Despite the blood connection, though, he didn’t last in the role either, taking the name Photon (again, from the hapless Monica Rambeau) before dying, being dismembered and having his parts spread throughout the Darkforce Dimension so they can never be reunited. (It’s true that no one is ever really dead in comics, but this comes pretty darn close.)

Did I mention Genis had a sister? He did, and his sibling Phyla-Vell also became Captain Marvel for a spell, before changing her name to Quasar, then Martyr, and apparently dying (although we’ve seen her soul in an infinity stone, so don’t count her out).

Then a Skrull named Khn’nr wore the Nega-Bands, and was brainwashed into thinking he was Mar-Vell, somehow resuscitated. After he died, another Kree named Noh-Varr claimed the bands and the name, before changing his nom du combat to Protector.

Gee, that’s a lot of Captains Marvel. A cynical mind might assume Marvel was just assigning the name to one character after another to protect the trademark.

But now it’s finally stuck. Remember Carol Danvers? You should, because she has claimed the mantle, and with her upcoming movie, is unlikely to ever give it up.

But she didn’t get the name right away. She surfaced as a superhero in 1977 with her own comic book and Captain Marvel-related super-powers. Unfortunately, Mar-Vell wasn’t dead yet, so she settled on the name Ms. Marvel. Various adventures saw her changing her name again and again, but “Captain Marvel” was never available when she did. She become Binary, then Warbird, then Ms. Marvel again.

Finally, in 2012 she was again ready to change her name, and nobody was using “Captain Marvel.” So now she’s got it. Whew!

Meanwhile, over at DC Comics, Captain Marvel struggled along without being able to use his name on a cover. With one series after another using some variation of “Shazam” as a title, fans began calling him that — and now it’s official. With its 2011 reboot, DC gave up on “Captain Marvel” and renamed Billy Batson’s other self “Shazam.”

And that’s why when you say “Captain Marvel” to a comics fan, he or she will inevitably say “which one”? It’s a storied title, but the stories star a lot of different people!

 

From: https://www.detroitnews.com/story/life/2019/03/12/captain-comics-many-iterations-captain-marvel/3091589002/

Visitors to Marvel artist’s Lake County exhibit ‘enter into such a different world’

The first thing Bruno Junqueira did when he left O’Hare International Airport at 5 a.m. Saturday after a long plane trip from Brazil was to drive to the Bess Bower Dunn Museum of Lake County in Libertyville.

There he met his hero, Alex Ross, a renowned artist of superheroes and villains for Marvel Comics and DC Comics.

Junqueira was among more than 600 people who came to the opening of the exhibit “Marvelocity: The Art of Alex Ross” at the Lake County Forest Preserves museum. Ross was there for three hours to autograph his new book “Marvelocity,” as well as various other books, drawings and other works of art he created that superhero and art lovers brought to the event or purchased there.

Ross, who lives in the Chicago area, is recognized as one of the nation’s finest modern comic book artists — and his colorful, detailed art work depicting Batman, Superman, Spider-Man, Iron Man and others grace the museum walls. Also on exhibit are superhero figures Ross drew and sculpted when he was a young boy.

A life-sized, three-dimensional Captain America sculpture Ross created is also on display, flanked by busts he sculpted of the Hulk and other superheroes. Some of this art has never before been seen by the public, said Ross, who has spent nearly three decades turning drawings of superheroes created by Marvel Comics and DC Comics into fine art.

When Junqueria learned he’d be flying into Chicago for a business trip the same day the exhibit was opening and that Ross would be there, he knew it would be his first stop. “My luggage is still in my car,” he said.

Junqueira added that “my biggest inspiration is Alex Ross’s work,” pointing out the artist’s ability to create detailed, colorful works to look as if they were either done in an acrylic paint or with water colors, or both.

“Since I was 6 or 7, I loved comic books and drawing,” Junqueira said. “It’s amazing how with that, you can enter into such a different world.”

Junquiera, a budding comic illustrator, brought Ross a gift — a drawing of Ross himself, which the artist graciously accepted just before beginning a three-hour stint of signing his works for his admirers.

Young and old were there because they love superheroes, and they love the art of Alex Ross. One woman wore a Batman sweater, earrings and necklace. Adults and children took selfies with the paintings and sculptures. Others browsed the gift shop filled with Ross’s work.

One superhero lover didn’t even know Alex Ross and his works would be there when he visited the museum.

Mason Reid, 8, of Vernon Hills, and his father Jerry came because Mason won a free pass to the museum at school.

“I walked in and I saw Captain America and all these pictures, and noticed this is a whole area dedicated to superheroes,” Mason said.

His favorite drawing was one showing Sandman attacking Spider-Man. “Spider-Man is using the force to defend himself,” said Mason, who loves to read comic books and draw — and, of course, he was Batman one year for Halloween.

The young boy recognized that superheroes weren’t one-dimensional.

“There’s some good and maybe a little bad in them,” he said. “Batman has a dark side.”

When asked what it was about superheroes that attracted adults and children, Mason said, “It’s a great way to express powers we don’t have.”

Mackenzie Kick, a junior at Barrington High School, came to the event to purchase Ross’s new book for $50, and have him sign it.

“I like his art style,” said Kick, a ceramicist who enjoys reading comic books. “You can see right there on the pages what you’re reading about.”

Justin Torres just plain loves superheroes. When the Chicago resident noticed that the displays included a sculpted bust of The Thing that Ross had created, he immediately took a selfie.

Torres knows all about The Thing. “He just got married and he’s Jewish,” Torres said, showing a cellphone picture of The Thing wearing a yarmulke for the wedding ceremony.

“He’s one of the original Fantastic Four from the ‘50s. He’s cool and grumpy,” Torres said.

Torres added he didn’t realize Ross lived in the Chicago area and that there was a museum in Lake County featuring exhibits like this one.

“This is a hidden gem,” he said.

Some visitors at the event asked Ross who his favorite superhero was.

His immediate response: “Captain America.”

“He’s always trying to do the best, be the best version of us,” Ross said in an earlier interview.

The exhibit continues through Sept. 8 during regular hours at the museum, which is located at 1899 W Winchester Road. Special events are planned, including a program on superheroes of the animal world.

Sheryl DeVore is a freelance reporter for the News-Sun.

From: https://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/lake-county-news-sun/news/ct-lns-marvelocity-exhibit-opens-st-0312-story.html

Superman Sunday – Action Comics #1007: The Comic Source Podcast Episode #727

In this episode we discuss;

Superman Sunday – Action Comics #1007

The Comic Source Podcast

Episode #727

Jace talks about the first part of the Leviathan Rising arc from Action Comics and why he still has reservations about what is going on with Lois Lane.

Action #1007

Writer – Brian Michael Bendis, Artist – Steve Epting, Colorist – Brad Anderson, Letterer – Josh Reed

From: https://lrmonline.com/news/episode-727/

Review – Superman: Action Comics #1008: Leviathan on the Hunt

Owner/Publisher, Editor-at-Large

Ken Denmead

Editor-in-Chief

Matt Blum

Managing Editor

Z

Senior Editors

Jonathan H. Liu, Jenny Bristol, Corrina Lawson, Patricia Vollmer

Gaming Editor

Dave Banks

Assistant Editor

John Booth

Associate Publishers*

MacKenzie Paulus, Megan Fulton, Tim Johnides, Jeff Williams, Dante Lauretta, Magnus Dahlsröm, Jayson Peters, David Michael, Gerry Tolbert, Andrew Smith, Ray Wehrs, Joel Becker, Scott Gaeta, Beth Kee, Joey Mills, talkie_tim, Danny Marquardt, Adam Bruski, John Bain, Bill Moore, Adam Frank, Lacey Hays, Peter Morson, James Needham, Matt Fleming, Adam Anderson, Jim Reynolds, Seiler Hagan, Bryan Wade, Petrov Neutrino, Jay Shapiro

Editor (Emeritus)

Chris Anderson

Core Contributors

Darren Blankenship, Rory Bristol, Robin Brooks, Mathias DeRider, Ray Goldfield, Jamie GreeneRyan Hiller, Rob Huddleston, Will James, James Floyd Kelly, Anthony Karcz, Michael Kaufman, Mordechai Luchins, Joey Mills, Brad Moon, Tony Nunes, Anton Olsen, Skip Owens, Jules Sherred, Shaun Washington, Simon Yule

Occasional Contributors

Tim Bailey, Sara BlackburnPreston Burt, Stephen Clark, Jeffrey Cohen, Adam Dimuzio, Mathias DeRider, Tom Fassbender, Luke Forney, Logan Giannini, Travis Hanson, Sean Hallenbeck, Michael Harrison, Kim HaynesWhit Honea, Greg Howley, Michael J.Angela Leach, Michael LeSauvage, Jim MacQuarrie, Eric Parrish, Michael PistiolasRicardo Rebelo, Drew Rich, Mitchell RoushMariana Ruiz, Tony Sims, Randy Slavey, Erik Stanfill, Andrew TerranovaGerry TolbertMark VorenkampChris Wickersham, Sean Z.

From: https://geekdad.com/2019/02/review-superman-action-comics-1008-leviathan-on-the-hunt/

Comics: Bats to blacken sky at SXSW; Green Arrow revival; and more

So many comics, so little time. Today, we have developments for three major DC properties and one Marvel IP. In this roundup, we explore Batman, Green Arrow, the Justice League, and Ghost Rider!

A swarm of over a million bats will black out the sky over Austin’s Congress Bridge at the SXSW festival in Texas this month in order to celebrate Batman’s 80th birthday, writes The Hollywood Reporter.

Using the hashtag of #LongLiveTheBat (not too snazzy if we do say so ourselves), DC will also launch the 1000th issue of Detective Comics, reveal a mural drawn by a local Texan artist, and begin to sell Detective Comics: 80 Years of Batman — The Deluxe Edition. Compound that with new merch and photo opps, and you’ve got yourself quite the Bat-related shindig going on.

DetectiveComics1000MainCover

Credit: Lee, Williams, Sinclair (Courtesy of DC)

The celebration will span the entire world with promotions at Six Flags amusement parks in North America and at Warner Bros. licensed parks overseas. Even the Boys Girls Clubs of America are getting in on the super-heroic action.

Amazon, Apple, LEGO, Mattel, Funko, Crunchyroll, and Rooster Teeth are just a few of the brand partnering with DC for a massive advertising campaign centering on Gotham’s Caped Crusader.


While the current Green Arrow comic series (by Collin Kelly, Jackson Lanzing, and Javier Fernandez) is ending today with its 50th issue, it won’t stay “dead” for long.

During an appearance on DC Daily, DC co-publisher, Dan Didio, admitted that another series will arrive sometime in the near future.

“The book is still performing well, but we decided to end the story there because we wanted Green Arrow to play very integrally in a lot of the stories and events that are about to take place across the DCU,” Didio said. “Because of that, it worked counter to the way the series was going and we didn’t want to run in two separate directions, so we’re bringing one story to a close and let this other chapter [keep going], but to be very frank with you, we will have another Green Arrow book. He’s one of my favorite characters … every once in a while, you need to do a reset. We want to take a moment to reset, show how he’s a part of the bigger DCU again, and then once you do that, have the series spin out.”

This news comes on the heels of yesterday’s announcement that the live-action Green Arrow series (simply titled Arrow) on the CW will come to a close after eight seasons.

Green Arrow #50 went on sale today.


Now, let’s talk about the Justice League.

In Issue #19, we meet a new variation on the team after Mr. Mxyzptlk (a reality-bending DC character) sends Superman through a portal into the Sixth Dimension. Clark is attempting to stop the Legion of Doom from unleashing an ancient evil by the name of “Perpetua.” 

Superman shows back up seconds later, revealing that he was in the other dimension for 10 years. His hair is now gray and he’s sporting an immaculate suit of blue, white, and gold. He’s even got a golden diadem resting on his noggin. As the Man of Steel brings his fellow heroes through the portal, the reader meets the Justice League of the Sixth Dimension.

Future Superman Justice League #19

Credit: DC Comics

By the end of the book, however, it is revealed that this new and dignified-looking Superman is not the one from our dimension. The genuine article is stuck in a dark void and unable to escape. By the end, we’re left with one major question: “WHO IS THE FUTURE SUPERMAN?!”

Now on sale, Issue #19 was written by by Scott Snyder and Jorge Jimenez. Artwork was handled by Jimenez with colors by Alejandro Sanchez.


And now for the single bit of Marvel news in today’s comic book news roundup: After putting the Ghost Rider onus on Robbie Reyes these last few years, the House of Ideas finally brought back the OG Rider, Johnny Blaze himself!

That being said, his appearance is more of a cameo at the end of Avengers #16 written by Jason Aaron and drawn by David Marquez.

After he’s deemed unfit for duty by the leading Avengers, Robbie is sent home, where he’s visited by Mr. Blaze, who says that he’ll “be back” and “the king of Hell will be here waiting.” Johnny continues that when they come face-to-face next time, they’re gonna take “a little ride.”

Ghost Rider Johnny Blaze Avengers #16

Credit: Marvel Comics

Robbie admits that Blaze was perhaps the greatest Ghost Rider who ever lived. Nevertheless, the man has turned into something horrifying, a monster beyond Reyes’ worst nightmares. In any case, let’s hope that we see more of Johnny Blaze from here on out.

Avengers #16 is now on sale everywhere.


From: https://www.syfy.com/syfywire/comics-bats-to-blacken-sky-at-sxsw-green-arrow-revival-and-more

James Gunn’s Superman horror flick Brightburn has a new trailer

Guardians of the Galaxy director James Gunn’s latest film is a return to the superhero formula — sort of. Brightburn is the story of child from another planet, and the good-intentioned midwestern couple that adopts him when his craft crash lands on their property.

But it doesn’t turn out exactly like the story you’re familiar with.

Gunn (and screenwriters Mark Gunn and Brian Gunn, James’ cousin and brother, respectively), are asking the age-old question “What if Superman was a bad idea?” And there’s no mistaking their intentions: From the flight, to the laser vision, to the red cape, this is a story in the shadow of Superman.

Rather than the Kents, Brightburn will feature Mr. and Mrs. Breyer, played by Elizabeth Banks and David Denman, with the young Jackson A. Dunn (that’s Dunn with a D, not another Gunn) as their adopted son whose middle school moodiness turns out to be a bit too much to handle.

In the comics world, there are plenty of stories of Superman being a menace to the world instead of a help. Only this fall, DC Comics’ DC House of Horror anthology special kicked off the Halloween festivities with a 10-page story in which Superman proves to be an alien monster child with terrible powers who immediately murders the Kents and soars off to menace the world.

Brightburn will hit theaters on May 29.

From: https://www.polygon.com/2019/3/6/18253569/brightburn-james-gunn-superman-horror-movie

‘Brightburn’ Trailer: Superman Meets ‘Carrie’ in James Gunn’s Superhero Horror Movie

brightburn trailer

What if Superman wasn’t good? It’s a nightmare dreamt up by plenty of comic book writers, supervillains, and Batman himself, but the new James Gunn-produced horror film plays out that scenario in full. Brightburn imagines a Superman origin story that goes horribly wrong, in which an alien, superpowered young boy decides to use his powers for evil.

Brightburn Trailer

From the alien ship crash-landing in front of an unsuspecting couple to the powers of super strength and flight to the red cape, Brightburn plays with some very familiar imagery. The trailer even recalls that of Zack Snyder’s Man of Steel: dreamy, sun-washed, vivid — but with a terrifying twist. Those dreams become nightmares as the young boy Brandon (newcomer Jackson A. Dunn) adopts a sinister persona that he uses to kill and torture people.

Cast out by his bullying schoolmates, and even by his adopted father, Brandon’s story has shades of Carrie — which follows a supernaturally-gifted teen as she wreaks havoc after being horribly bullied. Brightburn puts forward how easy it would be for a superpowered young boy to adopt a twisted mindset and become the monster instead of the superhero.

Brightburn stars Elizabeth Banks, who reunites with Gunn after the filmmaker directed her in the cult horror film Slither. She’s joined by Meredith HangerDavid DenmanMatt JonesGregory Alan WilliamsJennifer Holland and more, with a script from Brian and Mark GunnDavid Yarovesky, a frequent Gunn collaborator, directs while Gunn and the The H Collective produce.

Here is the synopsis for Brightburn:

What if a child from another world crash-landed on Earth, but instead of becoming a hero to mankind, he proved to be something far more sinister? With Brightburn, the visionary filmmaker of Guardians of the Galaxy and Slither presents a startling, subversive take on a radical new genre: superhero horror.

BrightBurn hits theaters on May 24, 2019.

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From: https://www.slashfilm.com/brightburn-trailer-2/

CCAD appears in latest Superman comic

The Canzani Center on the campus of the Columbus College of Art Design is featured in the most recent issue of Action Comics — before it’s blown to smithereens

The Columbus College of Art Design isn’t just a place for creative-minded students to hone their artistic skills. In the latest issue of Action Comics, starring Superman, it’s also apparently a great location for clandestine meetings and epic battles.

Unfortunately, the Canzani Center on CCAD’s campus isn’t able to survive an explosive confrontation between Amanda Waller — a high-ranking government official in the DC Comics universe — and Leviathan, a fictional criminal empire.

The issue’s writer, Brian Michael Bendis, included the locale — and its destruction — in an apparent nod to his guest appearance in September at the college during the Cartoon Crossroads Columbus festival.

The Dispatch was unable to reach Bendis, but after the issue was released last week, the Cleveland native tweeted that the idea came to him as Tom Spurgeon, editor of the comic-news website The Comics Reporter, interviewed him in the Canzani Center.

I was sitting on this very stage being interviewed by @comicsreporter thinking it was a great place for an assassination, went back to my room and wrote that… https://t.co/iBOA8BGzkT

— BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS (@BRIANMBENDIS) February 28, 2019

“I was sitting on this very stage being interviewed by (Spurgeon) thinking it was a great place for an assassination, went back to my room and wrote that,” tweeted Bendis, who lives in Portland, Oregon with his wife Alisa and four children.

In issue 1008 — featuring the art of Steve Epting — the Canzani Center and part of the campus’s iconic red “Art” sign are first seen as Waller enters the building for a top-secret rendezvous. Things go south after Leviathan makes an assassination attempt on Waller’s life, with an apparent gas leak leaving the building in ruins.

CCAD’s inclusion in Action Comics — which introduced the Man of Steel in 1938 and is now published by DC Comics — was a happy surprise to students and instructors alike, said Laurenn McCubbin, assistant professor in the comics and narrative practice program at CCAD.

“We had no idea that it was coming,” McCubbin said.

Bendis, 51, has won five Eisner Awards for both his creator-owned work and his work on various Marvel Comics books, including The Amazing Spider-Man, Daredevil, and The Avengers.

He was the primary creator of “Ultimate Spider-Man,” which introduced the character of Miles Morales — featured in Academy Award-winning “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse — and is the co-creator of the comic series “Alias” featuring Jessica Jones. He won a Peabody Award for his work as the co-creator and consulting producer of Netflix’s “Jessica Jones.”

McCubbin said she has known Bendis for 10 years and was the one who had the idea to invite him to CCAD as a guest speaker. After she saw the homage, she couldn’t resist needling him a bit.

“I laughed really hard and I texted Brian and I asked him, ‘Did you have a good time? Did you blow us up on purpose?’”

 

elagatta@dispatch.com

@EricLagatta

From: https://www.dispatch.com/entertainmentlife/20190304/ccad-appears-in-latest-superman-comic

CCAD appears in latest Superman comic

The Canzani Center on the campus of the Columbus College of Art Design is featured in the most recent issue of Action Comics — before it’s blown to smithereens

The Columbus College of Art Design isn’t just a place for creative-minded students to hone their artistic skills. In the latest issue of Action Comics, starring Superman, it’s also apparently a great location for clandestine meetings and epic battles.

Unfortunately, the Canzani Center on CCAD’s campus isn’t able to survive an explosive confrontation between Amanda Waller — a high-ranking government official in the DC Comics universe — and Leviathan, a fictional criminal empire.

The issue’s writer, Brian Michael Bendis, included the locale — and its destruction — in an apparent nod to his guest appearance in September at the college during the Cartoon Crossroads Columbus festival.

The Dispatch was unable to reach Bendis, but after the issue was released last week, the Cleveland native tweeted that the idea came to him as Tom Spurgeon, editor of the comic-news website The Comics Reporter, interviewed him in the Canzani Center.

I was sitting on this very stage being interviewed by @comicsreporter thinking it was a great place for an assassination, went back to my room and wrote that… https://t.co/iBOA8BGzkT

— BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS (@BRIANMBENDIS) February 28, 2019

“I was sitting on this very stage being interviewed by (Spurgeon) thinking it was a great place for an assassination, went back to my room and wrote that,” tweeted Bendis, who lives in Portland, Oregon with his wife Alisa and four children.

In issue 1008 — featuring the art of Steve Epting — the Canzani Center and part of the campus’s iconic red “Art” sign are first seen as Waller enters the building for a top-secret rendezvous. Things go south after Leviathan makes an assassination attempt on Waller’s life, with an apparent gas leak leaving the building in ruins.

CCAD’s inclusion in Action Comics — which introduced the Man of Steel in 1938 and is now published by DC Comics — was a happy surprise to students and instructors alike, said Laurenn McCubbin, assistant professor in the comics and narrative practice program at CCAD.

“We had no idea that it was coming,” McCubbin said.

Bendis, 51, has won five Eisner Awards for both his creator-owned work and his work on various Marvel Comics books, including The Amazing Spider-Man, Daredevil, and The Avengers.

He was the primary creator of “Ultimate Spider-Man,” which introduced the character of Miles Morales — featured in Academy Award-winning “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse — and is the co-creator of the comic series “Alias” featuring Jessica Jones. He won a Peabody Award for his work as the co-creator and consulting producer of Netflix’s “Jessica Jones.”

McCubbin said she has known Bendis for 10 years and was the one who had the idea to invite him to CCAD as a guest speaker. After she saw the homage, she couldn’t resist needling him a bit.

“I laughed really hard and I texted Brian and I asked him, ‘Did you have a good time? Did you blow us up on purpose?’”

 

elagatta@dispatch.com

@EricLagatta

From: https://www.dispatch.com/entertainmentlife/20190304/ccad-appears-in-latest-superman-comic

Jimmie Tramel: Decades-old courtroom clash opened door for Marvel’s ‘Captain Marvel’ movie

Whenever Jimmie Tramel posts new content, you’ll get an email delivered to your inbox with a link.

Email notifications are only sent once a day, and only if there are new matching items.

From: https://www.tulsaworld.com/entertainment/movies/jimmie-tramel-decades-old-courtroom-clash-opened-door-for-marvel/article_064e821e-4462-5b28-ad50-ee811d2c5062.html

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