WATCH C2E2: Action Comics #1000 panel celebrates 80 years of Superman

In 1938, Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster introduced the world to Superman in the pages of Action Comics #1. Next week, Action Comics #1000 will mark a milestone and kickoff the 80th anniversary of the Man of Steel. The party got started early at C2E2 as SYFY WIRE’s Mike Avila moderated the Action Comics #1000 panel.

Joining Mike were incoming Superman and Action Comics writer Brian Michael Bendis and artists Jill Thompson, Philip Tan, Pat Gleason, and Clay Mann

DC is actually double dipping this month with the Action Comics: #1,000: 80 Years of Superman hardcover, which includes contributions from classic and modern creators. Bendis was quick to point out that Marv Wolfman had given DC the pages from a lost story by artist Curt Swan, which will be reprinted in the hardcover alongside another unpublished tale by Siegel and Shuster… which was also provided by Wolfman! It begged the question: how many more stories does Wolfman have hidden away?

For Bendis, Action Comics #1,000 will be his first work for DC since he made the leap after nearly two decades with Marvel. Bendis had a major health scare last December and he jokingly turned the doctor who treated him into Superman’s next major villain. As recounted by Bendis, the female doctor wanted him to make her into a character who resembled a Marc Silvestri drawing, but she was disappointed to learn what her namesake will really look like.

There are more fun stories ahead, and you can watch the entire panel below!

From: http://www.syfy.com/syfywire/watch-c2e2-action-comics-1000-panel-celebrates-80-years-of-superman

C2E2: DC Celebrates Action Comics #1000 with Bendis, King and More

DC is on the verge of a major comic book milestone with April 18’s Action Comics #1000, which will feature an all-star lineup of creators, including superstar writer Brian Michael Bendis’ high-profile Superman debut (before taking over both Action Comics and Superman as the ongoing series writer).

Bendis, Tom King, Pat Gleason, Jill Thompson, Philip Tan and Clay Mann are talked Action Comic #1000, and the past, present and future of the Man of Steel, at C2E2 in Chicago midday Saturday, at the “DC Celebrates Action Comics #1000” panel.

RELATED: Superman Legends Simonson Ordway Return for Action Comics #1000

Panel moderator Mike Avila stared the session by recapping the contents both Action Comics #1000 and the Action Comics #1000: 80 Years of Superman hardcover. Bendis pointed out that the contribution in Action Comics #1000 featuring art by the late, legendary artist Curt Swan came about from making a story from unpublished Swan art that Marv Wolfman had in his personal possession.

Bendis thanked the fans for the warm welcome he’s received with his arrival at DC and Superman. He also shared that the new villain that will be introduced at the start of his Superman run was inspired by one of the doctors that treated him while he was sick last fall.

“I’m going to name one of the Superman villains after you,” Bendis told her. “She went , ‘Uh-huh,’ and she walked out. She walked back in, clearly having Googled me, and said, ‘I’m really excited to be in Superman!’ She though I was nuts.” The doctor was disappointed by the design of the character, as she was hoping to be a Marc Silvestri-esque drawing in a metal bikini.

Jim Lee illustrated Bendis’ Action Comics #1000 story, and Bendis opened up to the crowd about collaborating with him. “I wrote as big as I could,” Bendis said. “It was very, very cool.” Bendis said that his script for Lee was filled with “Jim Lee tricks” he learned from reading the artist’s work over the years.

DC Nation #0 is out on May 2, with a 10-page Man of Steel preview story by Bendis and José Luis García-López. Bendis called García-López a “bucket list” artist, and never thought he’d get the chance since he was at Marvel for so many years. “He’s the nicest person in the world,” Bendis said. “It’s so nice when you love someone’s work so much and they end up being absolutely awesome. It was made very clear he’s coming out of retirement for this.” Bendis said García-López told him, “Nothing makes me happier than a writer who has a story to tell, and wants me to tell it.”

Speaking of the weekly schedule of the six-issue Man of Steel story, Bendis said his recent major health issues caused him to realize he should tell these stories sooner rather than later. “I’m 90 percent sure I’m still in the hospital, and I’m Jacob’s Ladder-ing all of this,” he said. “Oh yeah, I’m skinny now, and I’m writing Superman, and working with Jim Lee and José Luis García-López.”

Gleason talked working with Bendis on Action Comics when it picks up in July with issue #1001. “It is really exciting to be going from Superman to jumping over to Action Comics with Brian,” Gleason said. “It’s really a dream come true. And we’re just getting started. I’m really excited about what we’ve been talking about.”

Peter J. Tomasi and Gleason collaborated for an era-spanning story in Action Comics #1000. “This is Pete’s love story to Superman, for all the eras,” Gleason said. “It was really fun to dive into the history for this.”

RELATED: DC Releases King Mann’s Full Action Comics #1000 Story

King and Mann talked their Action Comics #1000 story, which was released online last month. “I am unfortunately on the record of saying Batman’s the best and Superman sucks,” King said. “I regret it, I apologize. I didn’t have any Superman stories, because I thought they had all been told, he’s just a generic guy. Then I started writing him, and he’s not — he’s much more interesting than I thought he would be.”

Thompson’s Action Comics #1000 story is mostly focused on Lex Luthor, with Superman roasting him at a dinner. Thompson said that professional wrestler Alex Chamberlain posed for her for her Superman model.

The panel gave their take for definitive Superman artist: Thompson: Steve Rude. Tan: Alex Ross. Mann: García-López, also naming Jim Lee and John Byrne. King: Curt Swan. Gleason said he grew up watching Superman cartoons more than reading Superman comics, and named Dan Jurgens. Bendis cited a specific Brian Bolland drawing of Superman from Superman #400. “I think about it all the time. I think, ‘That’s the Superman we’re doing.’” Bendis added, “I go back and look at it now through modern eyes and I think, ‘Oh, he’s so British.’”

Tan, who drew Superman for the C2E2 program cover, said he used to feel hesitation drawing the character. Avila said drawing the S must be the hardest part. “I hate that S, it’s so hard to draw,” Thompson said. “It never looks right. I like to draw the retro ones.”

Gleason addressed the end of his and Tomasi’s Superman run. “Honestly, I didn’t think we’d last more than a year,” Gleason said. “The book comes out two times a month. We basically did a condensed four-year run in two years.” Their Superman Special is out on May 9, and helps put a cap on their time on the series, along with Superman #45.

Bendis talked about the daunting prospect of taking on Superman after the current runs end, since it’s easier for a creator to take over a book when it’s in a rougher place. “I’m breaking my own rule — both Superman books are really good right now. Not only what I not reboot a damn thing, trying to build on that is the bigger challenge and the fun.”

Bendis told a story about meeting George Perez when he was young, and getting invaluable advice from the artist that helped him push past his focus issue: “‘Focus. This is what you’re here for. If you’re really supposed to do this, nothing should distract you.’ I think about it every day.”

Pushing back on the idea that Superman isn’t relatable, Bendis said the character is actually “insanely relatable.” “I look at it even as a father,” Bendis said. “I’m the father of four children, and they need me to be the best version of myself every day. That’s his job. I can relate to that on my level. Also, there’s a lot of adoption in my family. I see that struggle for identity that goes on every day, and how no matter how much Superman accomplishes it, it’ll still be there.”

“I also love that he comes from far away, but his moral values are from the heartland of this country,” Bendis continued. “It’s so instilled in him he doesn’t even know it. I’ll prove his relatability!”

Speaking of bringing the red trunks back to Superman’s costume, Bendis said, “My whole day as a 50-year-old man, now I go online, and adult people yell at me about underpants, all day long. Non-ironically. ‘Go to hell, you and your red trunks.’”

(CBR’s coverage of this panel via Syfy Wire‘s livestream.)

Keep reading CBR for the latest from C2E2!

From: https://www.cbr.com/c2e2-2018-action-comics-1000-panel/

WATCH: Superman drawn by comic book artist Doc Shaner WATCH …

Comic book artist and cartoonist extraordinaire Evan “Doc” Shaner is probably best known for his classic art style which puts a modern twist on Golden Age comics and heroes such as Superman, Captain Marvel (the DC one) and pulpy hero Flash Gordon. While he’s mostly known for his work at DC Comics, Shaner has also provided some cool artwork for Marvel, Dark Horse, IDW and Dynamite.

He’s also worked on several titles ranging from Future Quest and Adventures of Superman to Ghostbusters. Next up he’s working on the second issue of Brian Michael Bendis’ Man of Steel six-issue limited series and taking on The Terrifics alongside writer Jeff Lemire and artist Ivan Reis. Shaner’s favorite character is none other than the Man of Steel himself and the artist recently sat down for SYFY WIRE’s latest edition of Artists Alley to sketch his take on Supes.

Pencil in hand, Shaner revealed the way he sees Superman mainly comes from comic book artists Curt Swan, Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez and Ross Andru but that he’s also influenced by the work of Jerry Ordway and Jon Bogdanove.

The trick to drawing the Last Son of Krypton?

“I try not to get too stuck and making him look classic,” Shaner told us. “I want to make him look modern because the Man of Steel has a modern story. I don’t want to worry too much about making him look like the character from the ’30s or the ’60s or what-have-you. This is today’s Clark Kent, today’s Superman. I would draw Superman all the time and it never quite looked right to me. And one day it hit me that his neck needs to be huge. That’s what makes him look like Superman. His neck is almost as wide as his head and when he’s in profile, his neck goes all the way back. So he’s big, he’s meant to be build big and sturdy. That’s part of what makes him look invincible so just making him look thicker seem to just key in for me for whatever reason ‘that looks like Superman.'”

Shaner also explained that his first experience with Superman was the 1950s TV show starring George Reeves and that until he was around nine or ten years old, he didn’t understand that Superman, Batman and Spider-Man were comic book characters since he first knew them as TV or movie characters.

There’s a lot more to unpack while the artist brings Superman to life on the page in our exclusive video such as Shaner sharing his fondness for Green Lantern, liking to draw Clark Kent and Superman equally, his thoughts on the Man of Steel’s trunks, and more!

Additional material by Nathalie Caron.

From: http://www.syfy.com/syfywire/watch-superman-drawn-by-comic-book-artist-doc-shaner

Superman Celebrates 80

Superman turns 80 as Action Comics hits 1000

As Superman approaches his 80th anniversary, Action Comics will reach a milestone on April 18, when DC will publish issue #1000 of the venerable title. The landmark comic will feature the work of a who’s who of comic creators from various ages of the character’s run, including a story by the legendary Curt Swan. Long-time Marvel writer and architect of their now defunct Ultimates universe, Brian Michael Bendis, who recently jumped over to DC, will take over the ongoing writing duties with issue #1001.

As even the most casual fan knows, historians consider Superman the first comic book superhero. Although there’d been costumed heroes in newspaper strips as well as pulp stories, Superman was the first created specifically for the burgeoning medium of comics.

Part of the character’s enduring legacy is that he hasn’t changed much over the course of his 80 years. There have been tweaks to his costume from time to time (the red trunks and gold belt are set to return, by the way), and even his powers on occasion, but who he is and what he stands for holds steady. Even when Superman appears in an Elseworlds setting or title, he retains his fundamental traits and personality.

Many artists and writers have taken creative liberties with DC’s other core heroes, particularly Batman and Wonder Woman, and many were significantly altered between the Golden and Silver Ages (Flash, Green Lantern etc.), rebooting and retconning them throughout eras to reflect changes in society and tastes. Superman has always been Supermanwith apologies to Quentin Tarantino, as many critics don’t agree with his thought-provoking, albeit unorthodox, analysis which dismisses the Clark Kent identity of the character.

Superman’s powers are various, but they aren’t what distinguish him. When the character chose to kill his enemy in 2013’s Man of Steel film, fans were outraged. They argued that Superman simply wouldn’t do that. Though he has the power to kill nearly all of his antagonists, he chooses not to. Superman is our idealized version of our best selves; what we strive to be. Even when DC has relaunched the character, they’ve always returned to the established central principles that define him, “Truth, justice and the American way,” despite how awkwardly hard to define that last one has been at several times throughout the last 80 years of our history.
Some might find the character boring, or bland, but it’s his steadfast quality that defines him and makes his stories unique.

Other than Grant Morrison’s All-Star Superman, arguably the greatest Man of Steel story ever told–but this was no Elseworlds, this was in continuity…

When DC brought on John Byrne in 1986 to relaunch the character and freshen him up, they first tasked Alan Moore with giving the existing version, basically a holdover from the Silver Age, his grand send-off.  Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow is an unsurpassed ode to the icon that still resonates today. By then, the character had become so over-powered that there seemed to be no credible threat he could face. Moore ran him through a gauntlet of his rogues gallery; a group which, save for arch-nemesis Lex Luthor and Brainiac, most agree pales in comparison to Batman’s (or the Flash’s, for that matter) for entertainment or dramatic value.

The premise of the story was that Superman’s greatest enemy was finally going to kill him. Moore ratcheted up the intensity and violence, escalating the mayhem until he revealed that the most dangerous villain among Superman’s foes was the one most fans had mistaken for comic relief for decades. It was a great twist, and Moore managed a feat most had failed to accomplish since the character’s earliest days—he put Superman in legitimate danger.
Moore also managed to make the hero more relatable than he’d ever been, by capturing what Superman meant to humanity, particularly those who loved him. Seeing the character through their eyes connected the reader to him on a Meta level previous writers hadn’t explored. He was no longer all-powerful, and therefore remote.

While the basic character of Superman has remained constant as the DC universe changed around him, his supporting cast and the mythology of Krypton evolved over time. Multiple film and television iterations, both live-action and animated, have proliferated, each tweaking the secondary characters and dramatic elements as necessary, to present a unique version of otherwise all too familiar stories.

Grandpa Seg-El holding Kal-El’s iconic cape. Apologies to Edna Mode

Rather than revisit existing continuity, SYFY has taken the liberating step of developing their recently debuted series Krypton, around the new character of Seg-El, Superman’s grandfather. The producers are free to explore the roots of the iconic hero, and what makes him special, without having to worry about any audience preconceptions. It’s a show that may explain how great Superman is, without ever actually featuring him. Grandson-to-be, Kal-El hovers over proceedings like a ghost from the future. He’s not the focus of the narrative—he isn’t even in it, though his famous cape is—yet it’s still about him in some ways.
But it’s a risky move.
A roguish anti-hero and, at least initially, nothing like the Kal-El we know, grandpa Seg’s victory is preordained: Clearly, he must live and triumph for Superman to eventually be born. Guaranteeing the success of the protagonist robs the plot of some dramatic tension.

However, we’ve always known Superman was going to win in the end. It’s been up to great creators to find a way to keep the stories interesting nonetheless. So here’s a toast to the first 1000 issues of Action Comics, and the next 1000 to come—may they always find a way to surprise us without ever sacrificing what makes the Man of Steel special.



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From: https://salutemag.com/2018/04/05/superman-celebrates-80/

5 comics to read this April, from vampire Veronica to 80 years of Superman

“April is the cruelest month, breeding lilacs out of the dead land, mixing memory and desire, stirring dull roots with spring rain,” is how T.S. Eliot began his iconic modernist poem The Waste Land back in 1922. Nearly a century later, April remains a month of contradictions — at least in the realm of comics. EW’s list of comic books to check out this month brings together all kinds of heroes and villains, from across space and time, in unlikely ways.

Action Comics #1000 (DC)
Various writers and artists

This year marks the 80th anniversary of Action Comics #1, when Superman first arrived on the pages of newsstand comics and changed pop culture forever. DC is celebrating in style with this jam-packed issue. In addition to bringing back Superman’s red trunks (which had been excised from the character’s costume during his 2011 redesign), Action Comics #1000 will also feature the DC debut of longtime Marvel writer Brian Michael Bendis, who will follow this issue by writing multiple Superman comics for the foreseeable future. Bendis isn’t alone, however: The massive roster of creators on the super-sized Action Comics #1000 includes Batman writer Tom KingSuperman movie director Richard Donner, the DC Rebirth Superman team of Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason, longtime Superman writer and artist Dan Jurgens, Brad Meltzer with John Cassady, Scott Snyder with Tim Sale, and many more. Any fan of the Man of Steel would do well to check out this very special issue.  

Order it here.

Exiles #1-2 (Marvel)
Saladin Ahmed (writer), Javier Rodriguez (artist)

This month sees the release of Black Bolt #12, the final issue in an incredible series that redefined the Inhuman king and challenged the use of prisons in a superhero story. (Among other things, it earned a place on EW’s favorite comics of 2017.) But fans shouldn’t worry too much, because Ahmed is sticking around at Marvel with Exiles, a new series about a team of dimension-hopping heroes. The lineup alone should get fans excited for whatever Ahmed and Rodriguez have in store: The mutant Blink leads a group that includes the Tessa Thompson version of Valkyrie, a battle-scarred Kamala Khan from a dystopian future, a young Kang the Conqueror, and a literal cute cartoon version of Wolverine. Read Ahmed’s breakdown of the lineup here, and note that the first two issues both land this month.

Order Exiles #1 here and Exiles # 2 here.

Vampironica #2 (Archie Comics)
Megan Smallwood (writer), Greg Smallwood (writer/artist)

If you think Archie and his friends get up to wild adventures on Riverdale, just remember that comics can always get weirder. While the main Archie comic carries on with normal high school adventures, Archie Comics’ other books take the characters into wildly different universes and genres. The Archies introduces the Riverdale kids to real-life bands like CHVRCHES, while more horror-themed titles like Jughead: The Hunger turn characters into monsters. Vampironica hails from the latter category, with its story of Veronica Lodge gaining vampiric powers and fighting undead monsters. But as seen in the first issue last month, Vampironica balances its supernatural shenanigans with interesting exploration of Veronica’s character.

“Veronica’s character has always had this brevity to her, you always know where she’s coming from — usually a place of selfishness or vanity,” Megan Smallwood told EW back in February. “As a fan, I’m used to her playing opposite to Betty’s good-naturedness, but Vampironica will be a little different in that aspect. The story and supporting cast is seen through Veronica’s perspective, and that lends itself well to building more complex aspects of her personality.”

Order it here.

Xerxes: The Fall of the House of Darius and the Rise of Alexander #1 (Dark Horse)
Frank Miller (writer/artist)

300 finally gets a sequel! Twenty years after Frank Miller first depicted the legendary last stand of Spartan warriors valiantly holding off overwhelming Persian invaders, the celebrated comic artist returns to continue the story of ancient Greece’s struggle with Persia. The first issue opens with the Battle of Marathon, and the rest of the series continues to explore the gradual fall of the Persian Empire and the rise of a new Greek force led by the young prodigy Alexander, who will one day grow up to be Great.

Order it here.

Deathstroke #30 (DC)
Christopher Priest (writer), Carlo Pagulayan (artist)

Christopher Priest’s Deathstroke run has been a DC standout since it first launched in 2016 as part of the DC Rebirth initiative. The comic just wrapped a fascinating multipart arc called “Defiance,” in which Deathstroke assembled a few young superheroes into his own superteam. Now that’s over and Deathstroke is back on his own, just in time to find himself face-to-face with the Dark Knight. The six-issue “Deathstroke vs. Batman” series-within-a-series kicks off this month. The showdown could foretell a coming cinematic showdown between the two (as teased by Joe Manganiello’s appearance as Deathstroke in the Justice League post-credits scene), but with Priest and Pagulayan at the helm, it’s a good bet these comics will be as entertaining as any movie.

Check here for a longer preview with Priest. Order Deathstroke #30 here.

From: http://ew.com/books/2018/04/03/april-comics-preview-actions-comics-1000-vampironica-exiles/

One of DC’s New Heroes is Revealed to be Stronger Than Superman

WARNING: This article contains spoilers for Damage #3 by Tony S. Daniel, Robert Venditti, Danny Miki and Tomeu Morey, in stores now.


Spinning out of the pages of Dark Nights: Metal, several new characters have been launched into their very own series under the “New Age of DC Heroes” banner. Leading the charge, both figuratively and literally, is the new super-strong DC hero named Damage.

The character’s origin borrows a more than a little bit of inspiration from Marvel’s Incredible Hulk: Private First Class soldier Ethan Every was turned into a super-soldier by the U.S. government, transforming into a super-strong, rage-fueled monster that smashes everything in its path. However, unlike the Hulk, Ethan only turns into Damage one hour per day. After that, he’s back to his regular, non-super-powered self.

RELATED: Damage #1 Introduces A New Take On A Classic DC Superteam

As a man, Ethan is just a soldier with basic, human limitations. But as Damage, he is pure, raw power. He is, without a doubt, incredibly strong. How strong? Well, as we discover in issue #3 of Tony S. Daniel and Robert Venditti’s Damage comic series, he is even stronger than Superman.

Damage and Wonder Woman fight

Ever since the debut of his series, Damage has proven what a fearsome force he is. Buildings fall in his wake, war-suit-wearing soldiers don’t stand a chance against him — in fact, entire armies can’t stop him. The team known as Suicide Squad XL went up against him … and was defeated in mere seconds. He punched his way through Giganta’s hand, he overwhelmed Parasite and Harley Quinn, Deadshot and Solomon Grundy were all ineffective against him.

Damage #3 reveals that it isn’t just the mid-level powerhouses who are ineffective in stopping him; the super-powered creature can hold up its own in a fight against Wonder Woman, for the better part of an hour. What’s more, it can overcome the effects of the Amazon Princess’ golden lasso.

RELATED: How the ‘New Age of DC Heroes’ Titles Tie Into Dark Nights: Metal

The fight between Damage and Wonder Woman is hard hitting and devastating. It leaves buildings crumbled to dust, and an entire city shaken. The only reason it ended in the first place is due to Damage’s one hour time limit. There is no telling how it would have ended were it not for this time constraint — perhaps even Wonder Woman would have fallen.

Later, Diana Prince reports back to Batman and Superman, telling them of her encounter. It’s here that the Amazon warrior, who has fought against gods, aliens and other super-powered beings, reveals that she has never before faced the level of strength Damage holds.

Damage Batman Superman Wonder Woman

“Never?” asks an incredulous, slightly shocked Superman, to which Diana simply offers silence. Wonder Woman knows Superman’s power levels, and the fact that she is silent when faced with the question is quite telling. Damage has proven himself even stronger than the Earth-bound Kryptonian, meaning that there aren’t many other characters out there stronger than him, on Earth or off.

In one fell swoop, we instantly got an idea of the levels of strength packed behind the punches of Damage, while positioning him as one of the DC Universe’s strongest characters. Not bad for a character with a mere three appearances to his name! We have no idea of his limits yet, but may get to learn just how strong he is when he faces the collective might of the Justice League.

KEEP READING: How the ‘New Age of DC Heroes’ Titles Tie Into Dark Nights: Metal

From: https://www.cbr.com/dc-comics-damage-stronger-than-superman/

Library of Congress Celebrates 80 Years of Superman




The Library of Congress (LOC) hosted a QA and book signing session on Thursday, March 29, with two legends of DC Comics. David Betancourt, a staff writer for the Washington Post, moderated the evening’s QA. Paul Levitz, a former publisher and president of DC, and Dan Jurgens, DC writer and artist, had much to share about their work and the legacy of the beloved character Superman.

DC hits not one, but two major milestones this year, reaching the 1,000th issue of its series Action Comics and commemorating 80 years of Superman. The LOC event coincides with Awesome Con, an annual pop culture and comic book convention also held in Washington, D.C.



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“Here’s something that was created that is still a living, growing, changing part of the culture,” said Levitz, marveling about the Kryptonian’s popularity. “Dan is writing it again. Movies are being made. The television series Krypton started a week ago looking at a different aspect of the character’s life. That’s an extraordinary thing in a culture that has the attention span of a mayfly.”

Fans may have noticed that Superman appears in recent comics and the newer Henry Cavill films without the red-trunks part of his Superman suit. It’s worth mentioning that those trunks make a comeback in the 1000th issue. Whether they stay remains to be seen. Jurgens, a longtime comic book artist best known for “The Death of Superman,” is a good panelist to weigh in on the subject because he’s drawn the iconic superhero both ways: with trunks and trunk-less. He confirmed to Betancourt that after the trunks went away, he continued to draw their outline in his underdrawings or preparatory sketches. “We always saw the trunks as part of the uniform as though it were all one piece, not necessarily something he put on the outside,” Jurgens shared.

The Man of Steel has been through many adventures over these 80 years. More recently, he and Lois Lane welcomed a son, Jonathan Kent, into their family. Jurgens sees a lot of potential in that storyline. He said, “If Superman is out there serving in terms of a beacon of hope and inspiration, and trying to guide those around him, would it be fun to do stories where we see him trying to do that as a parent? Is there some kind of duality there? Because ideally as a parent, you’re trying to be the exact same thing.”

supermanSuperman often joins forces with other superheroes in the DC universe, collaborations that continue to draw a lot of interest among fans. “When you put Superman among the other heroes, you really see his iconic nature because he’s fundamentally different from the rest of them,” said Levitz. “There are many other heroes that have incredible powers but in this mythology, he’s the primal figure. You see people reacting to him that way.”

It’s interesting to explore how the comic book industry has changed over the years. By the 1980s, the business model for selling comic books was changing. Initially, the newspaper stand was the only place to purchase comic books and when those started disappearing, companies faced a new challenge. “For a few years we were petrified we were never going to have new kids because we don’t have the newsstands to recruit them with,” Levitz recalled. “Turns out in fact, you can recruit people to read comics at a later age.I’m really comfortable that at this point we’re recruiting a lot of new people of all ages to come into comics. They’re just coming through very diverse paths, not the same that my generation came in.”

For more information about Superman’s legacy, be on the lookout for DC’s upcoming release of a special hardcover book called Action Comics: 80 Years of Superman.

The post Library of Congress Celebrates 80 Years of Superman appeared first on Blogcritics.

View the original article on blogcritics.org

From: https://www.seattlepi.com/lifestyle/blogcritics/article/Library-of-Congress-Celebrates-80-Years-of-12799332.php

Soar into Alex Ross’ stunning Action Comics #1 Superman …

Electrifying comic artist and illustrator Alex Ross has become a global sensation in recent years, conjuring up a masterful portfolio of unforgettable covers for DC, Marvel, Dynamite, IDW, Image, Dark Horse, and Boom!.

In addition to his superb comic book work, Ross has contributed art to a number of special projects celebrating the anniversaries and legacies of pop culture sensations like The Beatles, Universal Monsters, Batman ’66, Flash Gordon, and The Wizard of Oz.

Since bursting onto the scene with Marvels and Kingdom Come in the ’90s, his name has become synonymous with a signature photo-realistic style and dramatic compositions that cut to the core of the superhero mythos and redefine the way we view caped crimefighters.

In an exclusive new team-up between SYFY WIRE and Alex Ross Art, we’ll be unveiling many limited-edition Alex Ross lithos, rare variant covers, con-only surprises, behind-the-scenes videos, signed posters, intriguing interviews, and contest giveaways all year long.

First out of the gate is this spectacular, limited-edition fine art lithograph titled, More Powerful Than A Locomotive.”

Celebrating the 80th anniversary of Superman this spring, Ross has manifested the Man of Steel in a bold reimagining of the iconic Action Comics #1 cover from June of 1938. This new star-lit tribute litho depicts Superman hoisting an auto over his head to the horror of ordinary citizens fleeing the chaotic scene.

“Most people coming to comics realize the historical importance of Superman,” Ross tells SYFY WIRE. “But I’ve always loved very specific traits of the character, and in fact, very specific versions. When I saw some reprints of the oldest comics with him, from the ’40s, I immediately fell in love with the art style from then. He looked very serious, very rough and ready… a character built for the era of the Second World War. I like to connect with that earliest version of him, to bring him back to those roots.”

Painted in dark, moody blues and projecting an essence of startling change, it will be available for purchase in limited quantity at the C2E2 comic convention in Chicago from April 6-8. Each signed-and-numbered artwork measures 16″ X 22″, includes a Certificate of Authenticity, and is printed on premium, 110-lb fine art paper via an exacting process that recreates all the magic and mystery in crystal clarity.

After its limited advance release at C2E2, this showstopping homage will have a full online debut on April 18, which corresponds to the original launch date of Action Comics #1.

Fans and collectors can join the wait list at Alex Ross Art starting March 30 at 10 a.m. ET, with a per-poster price of $195.

Will you run faster than a speeding bullet to buy one of these beautiful “More Powerful Than A Locomotive” tribute lithos?

From: http://www.syfy.com/syfywire/alex-ross-action-comics-1-superman-anniversary-litho

Library of Congress celebrates 80th anniversary of Superman

It’s a bird, it’s a plane. No, it’s the celebration of the thousandth issue of DC Comics’ first series, Action Comics, and the 80th anniversary of America’s iconic superhero – Superman.

The celebration featured a panel with two people integral to Superman’s legacy, Paul Levitz, the former publisher and president of DC Comics, and Dan Jurgens, the writer and artist most famous for the comic book series “The Death of Superman.” The panel, held at the Library of Congress Thursday, was moderated by Washington Post reporter David Betancourt and coincides with Awesome Con, which will be hosted at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center this weekend.

The event took place in the Coolidge Auditorium, which featured displays of Action Comics ranging from the 1940s to the mid-1970s. The Library of Congress has one of the largest collections of comic books in the world. The stage featured various types of Superman memorabilia such as old posters, collectibles and covers of past Action Comics.

Levitz said it was a rarity that an entertainment franchise like Superman still sustains itself in American popular culture.

“There is very little that is culturally relevant in 1938 that is still culturally relevant today,” Levitz said.

Superman made his first appearance in the 1938 comic book series Action Comics, the series that introduced Superman. Levitz said people often find a connection to Clark Kent despite his near invincibility and incredible strength.

“The strongest part of Superman has always been the emotional part, and sort of his representation as an iconic moral figure,” Levitz said.

One of the most notable changes in the thousandth issue is the return of Superman’s red trunks – which were removed in the 2011 reboot of the DC Comics lineup – called the New 52. Jurgens said there were multiple design iterations, including how Superman wore the outfit.

“I think it’s the yellow belt, even when they got rid of the trunks we played around with a yellow ‘S’ shield for a buckle,” Jurgens said. “Ultimately, I think the trunks are needed because the yellow belt pulls the whole uniform together.”

They also discussed latest storyline additions to the Action Comic series, which included Clark Kent’s marriage to Lois Lane and the subsequent birth of their son, Jon Kent. Jurgens said the series allowed for new facets of the superhero’s identity.

“It allows us tell a little bit of a different kind of story with Superman,” Jurgens said. “Would it be fun to do stories where he tries to do that as a parent. Is there a duality there?”

After the interview, Jurgens took part in a question and answer session with the audience. Most of the questions came from avid fans who wanted to hear the speakers’ take on topics like the relationship between Superman and Batman or how certain supervillains like Doomsday, the first villain to stop Superman, were originally created.

“What superheroes, and in particular Superman, tells us is that we are all born with certain gifts and it’s what we do with them,” Levitz said. “How we choose to use them, it determines how the world grows, how the world changes and who we are.”

From: https://www.gwhatchet.com/2018/03/30/library-of-congress-celebrates-80th-anniversary-of-superman/

Soar into Alex Ross’ stunning Action Comics #1 Superman … – Syfy

Electrifying comic artist and illustrator Alex Ross has become a global sensation in recent years, conjuring up a masterful portfolio of unforgettable covers for DC, Marvel, Dynamite, IDW, Image, Dark Horse, and Boom!.

In addition to his superb comic book work, Ross has contributed art to a number of special projects celebrating the anniversaries and legacies of pop culture sensations like The Beatles, Universal Monsters, Batman ’66, Flash Gordon, and The Wizard of Oz.

Since bursting onto the scene with Marvels and Kingdom Come in the ’90s, his name has become synonymous with a signature photo-realistic style and dramatic compositions that cut to the core of the superhero mythos and redefine the way we view caped crimefighters.

In an exclusive new team-up between SYFY WIRE and Alex Ross Art, we’ll be unveiling many limited-edition Alex Ross lithos, rare variant covers, con-only surprises, behind-the-scenes videos, signed posters, intriguing interviews, and contest giveaways all year long.

First out of the gate is this spectacular, limited-edition fine art lithograph titled, More Powerful Than A Locomotive.”

Celebrating the 80th anniversary of Superman this spring, Ross has manifested the Man of Steel in a bold reimagining of the iconic Action Comics #1 cover from June of 1938. This new star-lit tribute litho depicts Superman hoisting an auto over his head to the horror of ordinary citizens fleeing the chaotic scene.

“Most people coming to comics realize the historical importance of Superman,” Ross tells SYFY WIRE. “But I’ve always loved very specific traits of the character, and in fact, very specific versions. When I saw some reprints of the oldest comics with him, from the ’40s, I immediately fell in love with the art style from then. He looked very serious, very rough and ready… a character built for the era of the Second World War. I like to connect with that earliest version of him, to bring him back to those roots.”

Painted in dark, moody blues and projecting an essence of startling change, it will be available for purchase in limited quantity at the C2E2 comic convention in Chicago from April 6-8. Each signed-and-numbered artwork measures 16″ X 22″, includes a Certificate of Authenticity, and is printed on premium, 110-lb fine art paper via an exacting process that recreates all the magic and mystery in crystal clarity.

After its limited advance release at C2E2, this showstopping homage will have a full online debut on April 18, which corresponds to the original launch date of Action Comics #1.

Fans and collectors can join the wait list at Alex Ross Art starting March 30 at 10 a.m. ET, with a per-poster price of $195.

Will you run faster than a speeding bullet to buy one of these beautiful “More Powerful Than A Locomotive” tribute lithos?

From: http://www.syfy.com/syfywire/alex-ross-action-comics-1-superman-anniversary-litho

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