Image Comics’ Erik Larsen takes on a ‘Supreme’ new role

Beginning in Supreme issue 64 this spring, Larsen takes over as lead writer and artist after Moore penned the character’s adventures for more than 20 issues. But there is still one more Moore story to tell, and that comes in Supreme No. 63, out in April from Image Comics and illustrated by Larsen.

First appearing in Liefeld’s Youngblood in 1992 as part of his Extreme Studios imprint before getting his own series, Supreme was at first simply Superman if he was complete jerk. When Moore took over the character in Supreme issue 41, he instead made him like the do-gooding Man of Steel he grew up with, giving him similar abilities as Superman, a mild-mannered alter-ego (Ethan Crane), the Lex Luthor-ish arch-enemy Darius Dax, a superpowered canine pal a la Krypto and even his own Lois Lane in the form of Diana Dane. (Even the cover of Moore’s first issue was an homage to Superman No. 1 from 1939.)

MORE: Check out an exclusive preview of Supreme issue 63

When they were looking at older titles to relaunch as ongoing series as part of Image’s 20th anniversary this year, Larsen was talking with his fellow Image founder Liefeld about having one final Moore script on the shelf when he had an epiphany about how to keep it going.

“A lot of creative people do this,” Larsen explains, “where you sit there and go, ‘Well, if I was going to write the next episode of Star Wars, this is what would happen.’ Most of the time, you really can’t do the next episode of Star Wars or the next whatever-it-is. But in this case, I actually could do this crazy idea that I just came up with on the spot.”

Moore had been toying with different realities and dimensions in his later issues, one with lots of Supremes (called “Supremacy”) and even a realm with all sorts of Darius Daxes. Larsen wondered if Moore’s Supreme had been running around for all this time, whatever happened to Liefeld’s Supreme?

“What I wanted to do was take what had been in the book prior to Alan’s run and take Alan’s run, and kind of marry the two in an interesting way,” Larsen says.

And for those who completely missed the past 62 issues of Supreme back story, issue 63 is a natural catch-up story. Moore summed it up well in his final issue, Larsen says, as Supreme gives his gal pal a guiding tour of his grand world, exposing her — and any new readers — to a history of what came before.

“It can be really cumbersome if you start over-explaining stuff. What it comes down to is what do we need to know, what’s essential, what would you be completely lost without knowing,” Larsen says.

However, what Supreme doesn’t know is what all the incarnations of his evil enemy are planning. And there is a major cliffhanger that moves right into Larsen’s run beginning in issue 64 that will also feature art by Cory Hamscher.

Larsen also writes and draws his original creation, Savage Dragon, on a monthly basis and hopes to share characters and connecting aspects with those of Supreme.

All in all, Supreme will be heading in “some wild new directions,” Larsen says.

“The book needs to be more than just an homage to Silver Age comics that Alan Moore liked as a kid. Me coming on board and keeping elements of what Alan has done — and at the same time add something new to it and add something old to it — I think it’ll be cool.”

From: http://www.usatoday.com/life/comics/story/2012-01-13/Supreme-comic-book-series/52539116/1

January 12, 2012: From Crisis to Crisis: A Superman Podcast


From Crisis to Crisis
Welcome to the 123rd episode of From Crisis to Crisis: A Superman Podcast! This podcast has a simple premise; examine just about every Superman comic published between Man of Steel #1 in 1986 to Adventures of Superman #649 in 2006 in an informative and hopefully entertaining format.

Part index. Part commentary. Part history lesson. All podcast.

This week Mike and Jeff “sat down” with a group of fellow Superman fans and podcasters to discuss where they were when Superman died and the personal and cultural impact of SUPERMAN #75. The boys are joined by SUPERMAN HOMEPAGE webmaster Steve Younis, SUPERMAN IN THE BRONZE age hosts Charlie Niemeyer and J. David Weter, THE THRILLING ADVENTURES OF SUPERMAN host Michael Bradley, THE GOLDEN AGE SUPERMAN host Jon M. Wilson and I’VE GOT A FEW THINGS TO SAY ABOUT SUPERMAN host Scott H. Gardner. Learn how each of the panel members first read this monumental tale of the Man of Steel and how they feel about the story today. Stay tuned after the closing music for the premiere of the trailer for From Crisis to Crisis’ FUNERAL FOR A FRIEND coverage.

Next time: Mike and Jeff kick off the previously mentioned coverage of FUNERAL FOR A FRIEND with JUSTICE LEAGUE AMERICA #70, ADVENTURES OF SUPERMAN #498 and ACTION COMICS #685.

You can subscribe to the show in two ways. First there is the RSS Feed and there is also the iTunes link. You can also download the episode directly.

If you want to comment on the show or contact the hosts you can always private message Mike and Jeff, leave comments here or email them at fromcrisistocrisis@gmail.com. All questions, concerns, fears, trepidations and cheap shots are welcome.

From: http://www.supermanhomepage.com/news.php?readmore=10771

Richard Schiff, WEST WING Alum, Reportedly Signs as Emil Hamilton in MAN OF STEEL

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  • From: http://comicbook.com/blog/2012/01/11/richard-schiff-west-wing-alum-reportedly-signs-as-emil-hamilton-in-man-of-steel/

    Concept Art From Factor 5’s Canceled ‘Superman’ Game Features Darkseid …



    Despite being one of the greatest super-heroes ever created, Superman hasn’t exactly had a lot of luck with video games. His most famous outing in the field, Superman 64, is commonly regarded as the single worst game of the N64 era, and considering a few of the other titles that got the Nintendo Seal of Quality, that’s saying something.

    But perhaps his worst bit of luck came when a game developed by Factor 5 (the studio behind the critically acclaimed Rogue Squadron) was canceled when their publisher shut down in 2009. While we may never know if the game itself would be good, the art from lead character artist Daveed Kaplan — uncovered over at MTV Geek by Charles Webb — shows that if nothing else, it probably would’ve looked cool. Check out the designs for the Man of Steel and some of his greatest villains after the jump!

    First up, of course, was Superman himself:



    Superman’s sporting his classic costume — trunks and all! — with the only major difference to his usual look being the shield, which is is styled more along the lines of the Superman Returns movie than the one featured in the comics of the time. That’s not really a surprise, considering that the game was in development only two years after Returns hit theaters.

    It’s also worth noting that while Superman’s pose in this picture is the standard position for doing turnarounds and showing off the costume, I really, really wish that it was how he’d look while flying in the game. Seriously, developers: You make a game where Superman just awkwardly hovers in the sky like Criss Angel, and I’ll buy two.

    Also pretending to be an airplane is Superman’s old foe Darkseid:



    Much like Jim Lee would later do with his post-New 52 redesign of Jack Kirby’s classic villain, Kaplan ditched Darkseid’s fashionable and intimidating skirt in favor of what appears to be a pair of ribbed sweatpants. Darkseid’s also given a more armored look, and while it almost makes it look like he’s cosplaying as 50 Cent from Blood on the Sand, I don’t really dislike it.

    That said, I vastly prefer his version of Kalibak:



    While he’s not quite as hulking as Kirby’s Kalibak, I really like what Kaplan did with this one. Much like Arkham Asylum redesigned Batman’s villains in order to emphasize their grittier aspects, the goal with these seems to be to amp up the sci-fi elements of Superman, which is a pretty neat way to go about it.

    Especially if it’s going to involve a bunch of aliens like Darkseid, Kalibak, and The Phantom Zone Criminals, General Zod and Non:



    Because really, where would we be without a reference to Superman II in every possible media outlet? Unlike the more complex Fourth World costumes of Darkseid and Kalibak, the Kryptonians — at least in these early versions — seem to have more simplified designs that reflect how they looked in the movies. Kaplan’s clearly gone straight to Terence Stamp for Zod’s face, and it works pretty well.

    Lex Luthor, however, has all kinds of stuff going on:



    It’d be interesting to see if Lex’s armor was blue because of a plot point in the game, or if it was just the color Kaplan was working with before touching it up with the character’s usual green and purple look. Considering that the game was called “Blue Steel,” I’m guessing it’s the former. Well, either that or the surprise twist that Superman had to battle against Derek Zoolander’s signature look.

    For more, check out Kaplan’s website!

    From: http://www.comicsalliance.com/2012/01/10/canceled-superman-video-game-concept-art/

    MILLARWORLD WEEK: Mark Millar’s Master Plan

    Millar and Yu’s “Supercrooks” kicks off Millarworld’s 2012 schedule

    Mark Millar hadn’t planned on becoming a creator-owned comics powerhouse, but it happened anyway.

    “My only real ambition since I was a kid was to write and draw comics. That was it. I just wanted to do Superman and Spider-Man,” the writer told CBR while discussing the week of exclusive previews of his Millarworld titles which started earlier today with a six-page look at “Supercrooks.” “Over the course of the last decade or so, I’ve managed to write all the characters I wanted to write. I never ever really expected movies or any of that to come from it. It sounds crazy, but I also didn’t get into comics to do ‘Kick-Ass’ or ‘Wanted’ or any of those things. I got into it to do the established characters I’ve loved since I was five. But there just comes a point where you suddenly think, ‘Yeah, I love this stuff, but I’m a little bored of seeing The Joker escape from Arkham or Lex Luthor sitting in a room thinking up plans to kill Superman. What comes next?’ I’ve realized that creator-owned is what comes next.”

    In 2012, that next step will run the gamut from film projects to a new era for his “CLiNT” comics anthology magazine and at least five new comic titles. On top of March’s launch of “Supercrooks” with Leinil Francis Yu, Millar also has plans for the continuation of his “Kick-Ass” saga in a “Hit-Girl” spinoff drawn by co-creator John Romita, Jr., a “Nemesis 2” sequel series with Steve McNiven, the impending “Secret Service” project with Dave Gibbons and the still unnamed collaboration with Frank Quitely. Most of those projects will publish thought Marvel’s Icon imprint, except for the Quitely book which will hit through Image along with a few other projects in the offing.

    And on the other side of entertainment from publishing, the creator is also taking an active role in film development for his new comics properties. “As we’ve been working on the movie adaptations of the various Millarworld books, I’ve realized that I like having control over the production side of things too,” Millar said. “‘Kick-Ass’ was such a wonderful experience, and ‘Wanted’ was really an amazing first taste of Hollywood. For your first movie to go out and make $350 million, that was just incredible luck, and I suddenly understood the movie had to be at least as good as your comic or your reputation was going to take a hit. Look at ‘League of Extraordinary Gentlemen’ or ‘Constantine’ or any of those brilliant Alan Moore comics that are now regarded by the public as naff movies.

    “The only way to guarantee some kind of quality control in your adaptations is to make sure you’re a big part of the production team and the best possible talent is involved in what’s essentially big adverts for your books. Would we have had the superhero boom of the last decade if ‘Catwoman’ and ‘Elektra’ had led the charge instead of ‘Spider-Man’ and ‘X-men’? I really lucked out with Timur [Bekmambetov] and Matthew [Vaughn]. Now I just want to make sure I keep getting the best talent attached to these things. We’re lucky that there’s been an extraordinarily high consistency with comic book adaptations from ‘Iron Man’ to ‘History of Violence’ and I want to keep that level up.”

    As the final element to his 2012 plan, Millar will introduce new content into “CLiNT” coming this March. “The nice thing about ‘CLiNT’ being an anthology is that every strip has a different flavor,” he said. “In the UK in particular — especially on the newsstand — anthologies have always had a home. And I like the idea of it not all being me (laughs). It’s great having Jonathan Ross and Frankie Boyle in there too, but one of the things I also wanted to do was have new talent in there, and this new strip ‘Death Sentence’ is fantastic. I absolutely love it. I actually met the writer at KAPOW last year, and he gave me an eight-page preview of it, and I just stood there in the street and had to read it. It starts in issue #15 of ‘CLiNT’, which is a great jumping on point as all the old strips finish in issue 14 and this is the beginning of a load of new stuff.

    Printing MillarWorld series in “CLiNT” gives fans more bang for their buck

    “I’m pleased we’ve managed to keep it so cheap, too. I insist we keep all the Millarworld books at $2.99 and I’m really chuffed about that. I know everybody says, ‘People are going to buy Kick-Ass anyway — make it $3.99.’ But I just think that’s too expensive as a comic. I know what it’s like to be standing in a store without enough money to buy the things you want to buy. So I don’t want to make my stuff too expensive. ‘CLiNT’ is 100 pages for almost half the price you’d pay individually for those issues. I like the idea of people getting a good deal out of this.”

    With all those pitch points in Millarworld’s favor, some fans may wonder if the seeming trend in big creators moving to creator-owned work will go as far as Millar has with many making their own comics exclusively, but he doesn’t see it. “Actually, I don’t think so because it is really nice working for a company. I was at Marvel for exactly ten years to the month, and it’s a pretty sweet deal. If I hand in my scripts on a Friday, it’s paid electronically into my bank on the following Monday. There is a lovely security to that where, if I write 22 pages of ‘Ultimates,’ then I get a really nice check a week later. But in creator-owned, you have to invest a little money and then you don’t get paid for a long time. As an example, I’ll write an issue of ‘Kick-Ass’ one month and then three months later, Johnny [Romita] has drawn the whole thing. Then, maybe three months after that, you get it published, and you get paid four further months after publication. Sure, the Millarworld books hit big numbers and we get to keep everything except the printing costs and a small distribution fee, but if your books don’t sell, you’re waiting perhaps a year for a tiny return. So I can really see the hesitancy to it — especially when the comic market isn’t really that energetic for a lot of people at the moment. I can see why some creators would be hesitant to make the jump.

    “But we’ve had an amazing run of luck with ‘Wanted,’ ‘Kick-Ass,’ ‘Superior,’ ‘Nemesis’ and so on,” the writer concluded, noting the ability success has given him in terms of experimentation. “They’ve all sold between very good and quite spectacular numbers, so the six of us who got together to do this thing — me, Leinil Yu, Steve McNiven, Frank Quitely, John Romita, Jr. and Dave Gibbons — we all just decided to go out there and have fun and pretty much do what the Image guys did back in the early ’90s. We really just wanted to make a go of this, so the guys have all climbed into bed with me if that doesn’t sound too creepy,” Millar laughed. “We’re going to keep trying to have the most incredible year in 2012 and put out the best creator-owned books we can do. It feels like exactly the right books to be doing at exactly the right time. None of this stuff feels like anything we’ve seen before. It just feels fresh and, right now, I think that’s what comics need. A reboot is lovely, but you’re essentially doing plastic surgery on an old person. This is giving birth to a newborn baby. In evolutionary terms, it seems like the correct step to be making.

    “I’m obsessed with comics past. The six of us are on the phone every day, drawing parallels between our formative years and what’s happening now. You had all that excitement at Marvel and DC through the ‘noughties,’ which is reflective of the ’80s revamps, but what’s coming next feels more like 1992, when the six biggest creators at one company got together and really moved the need with something different. That’s what we want to do here. DC had the ball in the Golden Age, Marvel owned the sixties generation of readers, the Image guys (and people massively underestimate them) reshaped the landscape for the last generation and I want the Millarworld books to be the boldest of the lot.”

    Millar and Gibbons’ “Secret Service” is part of MillarWorld’s 2012 slate of titles

    And keeping with his bold plans, Millar noted that a sixth title — an “American Jesus” sequel from Image — should be coming along too, once the comics and film worlds synch up for his Millarworld Productions shingle. “We are also doing a few side projects this year too,” he teased. “The ‘American Jesus’ movie has been getting crazy momentum in the last six weeks. We announced last year that we were forming Millarworld Productions and would make ‘American Jesus’ as our first big theatrical feature, and I’ve been gradually getting the money together for that outside the US system. All my other books were getting bought and made, but this one, which I had huge affection for, was just never going to happen. Everyone was just too nervous about doing a Jesus movie, and I was like ‘Are you kidding me?!?’ Mel Gibson made a Jesus movie, and it made $650 million dollars. What’s your concern? It made ‘Spider-Man’ money! But they still weren’t sure. It was one of those things I’d almost given up on, and then I realized I could make it myself.

    “We were planning on making it relatively modest, but then once word got out, investors came forward. It’s actually been quite a massive investment in the film. We’ve ended up with a budget about four or five times what we’ve expected, so it’s now going to be pretty comparable with ‘Kick-Ass,’ in budgetary terms. Over the next couple of weeks, there’ll be an official announcement on that one in the movie magazines where we can talk about who our partners are. But it’s very exciting and very unexpected. The ‘American Jesus’ comic-book sequel, which I’ve been scribbling for about five years, will be happening at the same time and we’ll bind them both together in one book when that movie appears, either in 2013 or early 2014.”

    Overall, what Millar hopes for his comics is a wide range of materials stylistically. Asked whether the increased freedom of creator-owned books leads to increased envelope-pushing with regard to content, he said, “I don’t think so. I think there’s the temptation. Creator-owned is a bit like when you’re 15 and your mom and dad are out of town and you’ve somehow found the key to the drinks cabinet. You can go a little bit crazy as things are new to you. In much the same way, if you’ve been doing ‘Spider-Man’ and ‘The Ultimates’ and then suddenly find the brakes are gone, you can go a little outrageous. But you don’t want to get repetitive. It’s like having the volume up to ten all the time. I think you need to mix it up more. ‘Superior’ is a great example, because it came out at the same time as ‘Nemesis’ and ‘Kick-Ass 2,’ but ‘Superior’ has a more gentle quality to it. It feels more like a Spielberg movie or something like that — something that you could give to young teenagers quite easily. There’s nothing too offensive in it.

    “I think I’m going to continue that mix in 2012 as well. The project with Frank Quitely is a very broad thing that anyone over ten or 12 can read. It’s not like it’s childlike; it’s probably the most sophisticated thing I’ve ever done, but there are no massively graphic sex scenes in it or F-bombs all over the place. Sometimes it’s appropriate and sometimes not. I prefer the Millarworld books to just be radical from an idea point of view. Nobody’s ever seen a superhero comic like ‘Kick-Ass’ before, and I want the Quitely project and the Dave Gibbons project to each be very unique and very new. People just want something different. You can see it in the charts. I feel creator-owned is where people’s interests are shifting. The vast majority of what I’m picking up comes from Icon and Image and, as we saw with ‘Nemesis’ or ‘Kick-Ass 2’ or whatever, these things can hit the top ten or top twenty, even in the middle of massive events or company-wide relaunches. we did 125,000 copies of ‘Kick-Ass 2’ #1 over five or six printings. The appetite for something new is enormous.”

    Finally, even as 2012 has become filled up with his workload with five major comics projects, film adaptations, the magazine and more, Millar is still looking to expand his brand into the future with new ideas and new artists. “Actually, I know pretty much all of the 2013 output and am starting to put that stuff together,” the writer said. “You have to remember that the books coming out now have all been worked on for much of the past year so we’re already prepping, for example, ‘Kick-Ass 3,’ the conclusion of ‘Nemesis’ with ‘Nemesis 3’ and a sequel to both ‘Supercrooks’ and ‘Superior.’ But two massive artists, one of whom I’ve never worked with before, is being lined up to lead the 2013 charge. What’s lovely is that the guys are coming and volunteering. A bunch of us have been talking about working together for a while and, if you get a big Millarworld book, it can be a pretty life-changing experience. I’ve really had a great time with all this and just want to build a library of books where my pals and I can do what we like, hopefully reaching as many readers as possible. So far so good.”

    Stay tuned all week on CBR for more of MILLARWORLD WEEK!

    Discuss this story in CBR’s Independents forum.
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    Tags:  mark millar, millarworld, titan magazines, clint, supercrooks, leinil francis yu, icon, secret service, kick ass, nemesis, superior

    From: http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=36323

    Baby Talk in ACTION COMICS #5

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  • From: http://comicbook.com/blog/2012/01/08/baby-talk-in-action-comics-5/

    Superman Gets New Origin In ‘Action Comics #5? But Does He Need One?

    Action Comics #5

    In Action Comics #5, Grant Morrison and Andy Kubert, care of DC Comics, will re-explore the origin story for Earth’s first and mightiest superhero, Superman.

    As it’s been done countless times, DC Comics has ordered up a brand new origin story for The Man of Steel, but this time, his story is the capable hands of my all-time favorite comic book writer Grant Morrison. Previously, Morrison had addressed the origin of Kal-El of Krypton brilliantly in one single page, the first page of his and Frank Quitely’s amazing mini-series All-Star Superman. So if there were any doubts as to whether Morrison could handle the origin, he can. But the question that begs to be asked from this is: Do we really need yet another origin story for The Man of Tomorrow so soon?

    Superman has one of the best and universally known origins associated with any character in all of history, so does his origin even need to be addressed to new and old fans alike? For most comic book readers and fans of science fiction and geek culture, in general, the answer is simply no. But in my opinion, yes, we do. But why?

    Really it’s just something that needs to happen for continuity’s sake. For Morrison to start Action Comics from issue one with obvious changes to the core elements of Superman, the origin must be addressed in some way to explain some of the major and minor elements to Superman’s character such as, “What actually happened to Martha and Jonathan Kent?” Or as this issue directly relates to, “What happened to Jor-El and Lara?” Or the even more pressing, “Why does Krypto look like a wolf?” All of these elements are things that fans will want to addressed in some way or another, and it’s a necessity for the story to feel whole even in the slightest bit. But it’s not even just continuity.

    Morrison is historically meticulous in how he sets up a story and is well known and revered for placing pieces of a huge story along the way throughout many of his comics long before there’s even a remote payoff to the questions that he raises. He’s done so in New X-Men, The Invisibles, Animal Man, and even in his recent Batman run. For example, events that happen in the first few issues of the Batman and Son storyline were not explained (but were ultimately explained brilliantly) until the final installments of Batman and Robin and even more recently in Batman Incorporated: Leviathan Strikes. So, with that in mind, an origin for a character that is starting a new series within a new universe thanks to the DC relaunch is absolutely dire.

    You may not want a new origin story for Superman, but if you’re reading Action Comics, which you should be, well then I’m sorry to tell you, you’re going to absolutely need one.

    Also, go check out the preview for the 40-page Action Comics #5 on Wired and Geek Dad so you can get hyped for the release today, January 4, 2012! Wahoo!

    From: http://www.geeksofdoom.com/2012/01/04/superman-gets-new-origin-in-action-comics-5-but-does-he-need-one/

    DC Comics releases preview art of Batman: Earth One, Superman: Earth One, Vol. 2

    Geoff Johns and Gary Frank’s “Batman: Earth One” will be released in 2012, and DC Comics has released preview art from the book at the DC Comics Source blog.

    The book is a retelling of the Batman legend in a contemporary setting.

    “Gary and I are tackling BATMAN from the beginning, before he knows what he’s doing and with a very different ultimate goal in mind,” said Johns. “He’s never left Gotham. And our Gotham and the people in it are very gray. Our heroes unlikely. Our villains hidden. Our story is only beginning with volume one.”

    Also, the best-selling “Superman: Earth One,” by J. Michael Straczynski and Shane Davis, will be getting a second volume in 2012.

    “The overwhelming success of volume one of SUPERMAN: EARTH ONE – 37 weeks on the New York Times Bestseller list for graphic novels – meant we had to ensure that Volume Two was even better,” said Straczynski.  Preview art for vol. 2 was also released at the Source blog.

    – Matt Price
    Click past the cut to see the preview art released for the two books.


    superman-earth-one-vol-2-2

    superman-earth-one-vol-2

    batman-earth-one-3

    batman-earth-one-2

    batman-earth-one

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    From: http://blog.newsok.com/nerdage/2012/01/05/dc-comics-releases-preview-art-of-batman-earth-one-superman-earth-one-vol-2/

    Superman Review: Action Comics #5 By Grant Morrison And Andy Kubert

    Action Comics #5

    Written by Grant Morrison

    Art by Andy Kubert, Jesse Delperdang, and Brad Anderson

     

     

    The short of it:

    Big time origin issue? Sort of. This issue debuts Jor-El, Lara, and Jonathan and Martha Kent. Witness the destruction of Krypton, the Phantom Zone, Krypto’s last stand, and the secrets of Superman’s arrival to an alien fearing Earth. The whole issue seems to take place in flashbacks, obviously, and it’s…well, it’s a straightforward issue. Krypton goes boom so Jor-El sends his only son to Earth knowing he’ll be stronger. Jonathan and Martha Kent, a farming couple incapable of having their own kids, find the spaceship and raise baby Kal El on their own as Clark Kent, who one day becomes Superman. It’s the origin of Superman, I mean, seriously. The army taking his ship and the confusing timeline of the final pages in the Fortress of Solitude are the only parts of the issue that don’t seem to refer back to his origin, though in hindsight…the end pages may be happening at the same time as the other issues in the arc. Regardless, there’s an Anti-Superman Army and a big part of Superman’s history confirmed.

     

    What I liked:

    • Andy Kubert on art, nice touch. I like Andy’s work, and he really does make a great fit with any of DC’s icons. If anything, I regret that this issue only features two looks at an in costume Superman so he doesn’t even get to draw the action!
    • The accelerated origin did a nice job getting the changes across as quick as possible, really just adding in the military helped out. It feels more like a Supreme Power reality, only unlike Mark Milton, Kal El wasn’t promptly found and secured as an asset.
    • The ‘alien’ that Jonathan gives the army cracked me up, as after he off handedly mentioned something a few pages earlier I kept saying “I want to see that”.
    • For as enigmatic as they were, and for as little as we know about them, the Anti-Superman Army intrigues me. Is each powered by a different form of Kryptonite?
    • L.L.T.L.
    • The backup story about Jonathan and Martha in their years before finding Clark is a bit ham fisted, but I like it. I understand that the Kent’s are dead in this new universe so they really shouldn’t be major factors, but seeing their determination to be parents sets up their raising of Clark as well as a dozen flashbacks to them actually doing it. You root for them while the full time knowing that they get baby Superman…since for one everyone knows the origin, and for two we already saw the end of the story earlier in it.

     

    What I didn’t like:

    • We don’t need another origin for Superman, especially when the changes are so….minor. They could have told us that the military swooped in and got his ship, because really, after the Krypton pages the issue sort of just happens for a little while. I know that the Kent’s find the baby and raise him to be Superman. We all know this. Every two years another writer tries to remind us of it.
    • I REALLY don’t like the whole ‘weaker gravity lets him seem to fly’. He’s Superman. He flies. Period.
    • Superman’s shirt is blue again this issue, which tells me that last month saw a big time coloring error that is just not going to be acknowledged.
    • The issue goes through phases of Morrison doing Morrison things, in other words, it’s awesome and you know it’s going to become more awesome, but you have no idea what the hell is happening yet. Case in point, half the ship’s narration, and all of the Anti-Superman Army. So many hints to wrap up an issue that nothing of note happens in doesn’t do any of them justice.

     

    Final thoughts:

     

    Needless origin issues are needless. Seriously, if Scott Snyder spent an issue talking about the death of Bruce Wayne’s parents I’d be just as annoyed. This isn’t some obscure character that needs a refreshed audience, this is Superman. The changes they did could have been handled with exposition, and really, they should have cut from the Krypton stuff immediately to the present and not spent time reminding us of the obvious.

     

    There were definitely some parts that reminded me of Grant’s All Star Superman, but the pacing is just a completely different beast. There’s the same level of big concept going on, but I’m unsure of when to expect the payoff. That said, the Army just sounds awesome.

     

    Again, L.L.T.L.

     

    Kubert was a great choice for art here, though I’d say that anytime they found something for him to do. I’ll admit that Rags Morales is sorely missed, but that’s mainly due to this being the fifth issue and we’ve already seen three artists on the book. But really, so long as they keep the art quality where it has been at, I don’t think I’ll complain.

     

    Wait, was this a fill in issue? I think this may have been a fill in issue.

     

    Overall: 6.5/10


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    From: http://insidepulse.com/2012/01/04/superman-review-action-comics-5-by-grant-morrison-and-andy-kubert/

    Tim Burton’s Superman Lives Toy Concept Art

    Bryan Singer bored the crotch out of Clark Kent with Superman Returns, Dark Shadows director Tim Burton was set to take on the Man of Steel with Superman Lives, which would have brought the man’s unique personal style and vision to the DC Comics property.

    As Superman: Man of Steel gears up for its 2013 release, we have been lucky enough to finally get a look at some of the odd costumes and concept art that Tim Burton was working on before his film got shot down. Today, we have a look at some of the toy concept art, which would have been in the guise of actor Nicolas Cage had this movie ever come to light.

    Included in this newly discovered batch of artwork is a look at Superman’s suit from early in the story, before his death. There is also a look at Superman’s tomb, The Eradicator Suit, which conceals Superman’s identity, The Eradicator, protector of Superman after his death, and Superman’s Recovery Suit.

    Brianiac would have been Superman’s main foe in Superman Lives. A Skull Ship maquette shows off what this villain’s means of travel would have looked like. It would have made a cool toy, but it may have been a little goofy to actually see on screen. Check out all of this toy art below and decide for yourself.

    Superman Lives Toy Concept Art #1

    Superman Lives Toy Concept Art #2
    Superman Lives Toy Concept Art #3

    Superman Lives Toy Concept Art #4

    Superman Lives Toy Concept Art #5

    Superman Lives Toy Concept Art #6

    Superman Lives Toy Concept Art #7

    Superman Live advanced teaser 1-Sheet

    From: http://www.movieweb.com/news/NEhju8gekr93jm

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