The Flash just name-dropped Earth-15. Here’s what that could mean for the Arrowverse

The latest episode of The CW’s The Flash, “The Trial of the Flash,” was largely about, well, the trial of the Flash. But there was also a metahuman subplot involving Fallout, a meta who is a walking nuclear bomb. While the resolution of that B-plot — wherein Barry funnels Fallout’s radiation upward so Cisco can vibe it to another dimension — might have seemed simple and resolved, in actuality, Harrison Wells may have dropped a major Easter egg for where The Flash (and the Arrowverse) could be going in seasons to come as a result of that seemingly innocuous moment: Earth-15.

When Cisco asks where he should vibe all that intense radiation, Wells tells him to send it to Earth-15 because “Earth-15 is a dead Earth.”

And that might prompt you to wonder, “why is Earth-15 dead and what was it like before that?” Considering “the multiverse” is the watchword for both The Flash‘s stories and the Arrowverse as a whole at this point, those are questions worth asking.

Thankfully, the answer to those questions exists. At least, they do in the world of DC comics.

WHAT WAS EARTH-15 LIKE?

Interestingly, prior to it’s total annihilation, Earth-15 was kind of a paradise. Crime was virtually non-existent on Earth-15 and the superheroes that remained were largely inheritors of their respective names rather than the originals. The sidekicks and protégés had become the masters.

On Earth-15, Wonder Woman is Donna Troy; the Batman mantle has been taken up by the second Robin, Jason Todd; rather than Kal-El, the Superman title belongs to Zod. There’s also a Kyle Rayner-like Green Lantern and a female version of The Atom, Jessica Palmer. They all work together to keep the peace and are, so far as we know, more or less perfect at their jobs.

But then Superman-Prime shows up and literally destroys the entire planet.

WHO IS SUPERMAN-PRIME?

Oh, gosh. Where to begin? Here is the short-ish version:

Superboy-Prime (wait for it) is a version of Superman from a place known as, surprise, Earth-Prime. And Earth-Prime is, in many respects, our Earth, aka the Earth where DC Comics is real and the comic characters it creates are not.

Funnily enough, Barry Allen accidentally travels to Earth-Prime at one point and enlists the help of real-life DC editor, Julius Schwartz, to create a cosmic treadmill to get back to Earth-One.

But that is not the only way that Earth-Prime diverges from our actual Earth and connects with the DC Universe we know and love. There’s also a young man who lives there and his name is, as you might have guessed, Clark Kent. But this Clark is not from Kansas nor is he an intrepid reporter or a superhero.

He is, however, a fanboy. Despite the jokes his friends make about his name, this Clark does like the character of Superman. And, wouldn’t you know it, he gets to meet the Earth-One version of Superman, which results in Superboy-Prime finding out that he is from Krypton and is a version of Superman. Earth-One Superman takes Superboy-Prime with him to multiverses unknown so he can be taught to be a hero.

Then Earth-Prime and most other Earths are destroyed by the Anti-Monitor (long story).

The short of it is, Superboy-Prime grows up, becomes Superman-Prime and is very bitter about losing his world. He eventually becomes so powerful and so bitter that he starts going to other Earths to kill other versions of Superman (kind of a Highlander situation) and also maybe destroy those entire Earths, too, in the process.

And that, in a nutshell, is who Superman-Prime is. And also what happens to Earth-15.

 

WHAT DOES ALL THAT MEAN FOR THE ARROWVERSE?

Potentially? A whole lot.

Here’s what we know right now: Barry and Cisco just fired a LOT of radiation to an Earth they were told is 100% dead.

But is it? In the comics, at least, the Earth-15 versions of Green Lantern and Jessica Palmer, aka The Atom, escaped the planet before it was destroyed by Superman-Prime. So there’s no reason to assume that the Arrowverse couldn’t also have an Earth-15 where there were some survivors.

And that’s not all. One of the reasons Earth-15 is discovered in the first place is because some other Earth DC heroes are in search of a hero we know well from the Arrowverse — Ray Palmer. Ray is currently on DC’s Legends of Tomorrow, which is largely about time travel. So there’s no reason that, in addition to traveling in time, Ray and the Legends team couldn’t also travel to a parallel Earth, such as, say, Earth-15. Barry and Cisco do it on the reg.

And then there’s Supergirl‘s elephant in the room, Superman. People love Tyler Hoechlin’s performance, but he’s seldom used because that would detract from the heroism of his cousin, the title character, Supergirl. He might help Kara fight Reign on Supergirl or we might see the supposed fight between Superman and Eobard Thawne that was mentioned on Legends of Tomorrow.

Or, taking into account our Earth-15 theory, Hoechlin could be repurposed on The Flash as Superman-Prime.

Credit: The CW

Together the heroes of the Arrowverse have taken on aliens in the Dominators and they’ve fought multiverse Nazis — but they’ve never faced anything like a super-powerful (and super-evil) version of Superman.

And none of that even touches upon the Cosmic Grail, a supposed fragment of Earth-15 that holds enormous powers, possibly from the home of the Lantern Corps, Oa.

Harry has name-dropped Earth-15. There’s established DC canon for Ray Palmer to go to Earth-15. And given how Barry travels to alternate Earths by accident sometimes, it’s not crazy to think we might be introduced to Earth-Prime at some point, thus also opening the door to, survey says, Superman-Prime.

If a show like Supergirl can financially manage introducing the Legion of Superheroes, there’s no reason The Flash (and potentially other shows within the Arrowverse) couldn’t encounter an alternate Green Lantern or a Superman-Prime.

And if that all sounds far-fetched, just remember: the show’s writers could have named dropped any place for Cisco to filter out Fallout’s radiation, but they chose Earth-15; The Flash is all about name-dropping things in an intense moment only to bring them back later. After all, that’s how we got to current big bad DeVoe, right? Right.

What do you think? Would you want to see some part of the Lantern Corps introduced into the Arrowverse? Are you hopeful for a version of Superman-Prime who doesn’t say the cringeworthy phrase, “I’ll kill you to death!” Fingers crossed.

From: http://www.syfy.com/syfywire/the-flash-just-name-dropped-earth-15-heres-what-that-could-mean-for-the-arrowverse

Review – Superman #39: Caring For Kids

Owner/Publisher, Editor-at-Large

Ken Denmead

Editor-in-Chief

Matt Blum

Managing Editor

Z

Senior Editors

Jonathan H. Liu, Jenny Bristol, Corrina Lawson, Patricia Vollmer

Gaming Editor

Dave Banks

Associate Publishers*

Tim Johnides, Jeff Williams, Dante Lauretta, Magnus Dahlsröm, Jayson Peters, David Michael, Gerry Tolbert, Andrew Smith, Ray Wehrs, Joel Becker, Scott Gaeta, Beth Kee, Joey Mills, talkie_tim, Danny Marquardt, Adam Bruski, John Bain, Bill Moore, Adam Frank, Lacey Hays, Peter Morson, James Needham, Matt Fleming, Adam Anderson, Jim Reynolds, Seiler Hagan, Bryan Wade, Petrov Neutrino, Jay Shapiro

Editor (Emeritus)

Chris Anderson

Core Contributors

Darren Blankenship, Rory Bristol, Robin Brooks, Preston Burt, Samantha Fisher, Ray Goldfield, Jamie Greene, Michael Harrison, Ryan Hiller, Rob Huddleston, Will James, James Floyd Kelly, Anthony Karcz, Michael Kaufman, Mordechai Luchins, Brad Moon, Tony Nunes, Anton Olsen, Jules Sherred, Mark Vorenkamp, Chris Wickersham, Simon Yule

Occasional Contributors

Tim Bailey, Natania BarronJohn Booth, Samantha Bryant, Stephen Clark, Tom Fassbender, Matt ForbeckMelissa Ford, Bernd Grobauer, Travis Hanson, Kishore Hari, Whit Honea, Sarah James, John Kovalic, Michael LeSauvage, Jim MacQuarrie, Joey Mills, Skip Owens, Ricardo Rebelo, Drew Rich, Andy Robertson, Mariana Ruiz, Derrick Schneider, Bill Shribman, Tony Sims, Randy Slavey, Gerry Tolbert, Michael Witwer

From: https://geekdad.com/2018/01/review-superman-39-caring-kids/

Review – Superman #39: Caring For Kids

Owner/Publisher, Editor-at-Large

Ken Denmead

Editor-in-Chief

Matt Blum

Managing Editor

Z

Senior Editors

Jonathan H. Liu, Jenny Bristol, Corrina Lawson, Patricia Vollmer

Gaming Editor

Dave Banks

Associate Publishers*

Tim Johnides, Jeff Williams, Dante Lauretta, Magnus Dahlsröm, Jayson Peters, David Michael, Gerry Tolbert, Andrew Smith, Ray Wehrs, Joel Becker, Scott Gaeta, Beth Kee, Joey Mills, talkie_tim, Danny Marquardt, Adam Bruski, John Bain, Bill Moore, Adam Frank, Lacey Hays, Peter Morson, James Needham, Matt Fleming, Adam Anderson, Jim Reynolds, Seiler Hagan, Bryan Wade, Petrov Neutrino, Jay Shapiro

Editor (Emeritus)

Chris Anderson

Core Contributors

Darren Blankenship, Rory Bristol, Robin Brooks, Preston Burt, Samantha Fisher, Ray Goldfield, Jamie Greene, Michael Harrison, Ryan Hiller, Rob Huddleston, Will James, James Floyd Kelly, Anthony Karcz, Michael Kaufman, Mordechai Luchins, Brad Moon, Tony Nunes, Anton Olsen, Jules Sherred, Mark Vorenkamp, Chris Wickersham, Simon Yule

Occasional Contributors

Tim Bailey, Natania BarronJohn Booth, Samantha Bryant, Stephen Clark, Tom Fassbender, Matt ForbeckMelissa Ford, Bernd Grobauer, Travis Hanson, Kishore Hari, Whit Honea, Sarah James, John Kovalic, Michael LeSauvage, Jim MacQuarrie, Joey Mills, Skip Owens, Ricardo Rebelo, Drew Rich, Andy Robertson, Mariana Ruiz, Derrick Schneider, Bill Shribman, Tony Sims, Randy Slavey, Gerry Tolbert, Michael Witwer

From: https://geekdad.com/2018/01/review-superman-39-caring-kids/

Heartache behind the creation of Superman, who began comic strip life on this day in 1939

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IS it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it’s . . . Superman, of course, who began life as a comic strip on January 16, 1939.

Everyone these days knows that newspaper reporter Clark Kent and Superman are one and the same person, but back in the 30s, our favourite superhero was that little bit more mysterious.

You may not have heard the heartbreaking story behind the creation of Superman — Man of Steel.

Written by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster in the 1930s, his creation seems to have been as a consequence of the death of Jerry’s father, Mitchell.

In the summer of 1932, he died during a night-time robbery at his second-hand clothes shop, in Cleveland.

Although shots were fired, the cause of death was attributed to a heart attack.

Jerry later created a man who was bulletproof and could avenge evil and fight for good — this doesn’t seem to be mere coincidence.

Cover art for the ‘Superman’ comic book (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

In one of the oldest-surviving sketches, Superman even came to the aid of a man being held up by a masked robber.

By the time that 1941 rolled around, the McClure Syndicate had placed the Superman strip in hundreds of newspapers.

At its peak, it was in more than 300 daily newspapers and 90 Sunday ones, with a readership of over 20 million.

It was not, however, an overnight success, and it took the writers many years to sell their idea.

Their pay cheque when they did so was for a paltry $130, for DC Comics to have the rights to the character “forever”.

Some legal battles ensued in later years to claim back some rights.

DC Comics eventually gave Siegel and Shuster $20,000 a year for life and included their names in all future Superman-related publications.

The popularity of all things Superman obviously didn’t just stop with comics, though, as Hollywood has celebrated huge success with multiple Superman big-screen adventures.

In more recent years, Henry Cavill has starred as Lex Luthor’s nemesis, but surely the most-memorable portrayals are those by the late, great Christopher Reeve.

His first venture as the Man of Steel was the second-highest grossing film in 1978, behind Grease.

Superman was named the Greatest Comic Book Character by Empire magazine, and spin-off films — not to mention TV series — have been watched by millions of fans from all around the world.

It’s a fitting tribute from a writer whose own real-life hero was his dad.

From: https://www.sundaypost.com/fp/heartache-behind-the-creation-of-superman-who-began-comic-strip-life-on-this-day-in-1939/

‘Superman: The Movie’ Alum Sarah Douglas Comes to ‘Supergirl’ in …

The CW has released photos for “Fort Rozz”, the upcoming eleventh episode of Supergirl‘s third season. You can check them out in our gallery below.


Supergirl 03x11

Supergirl 03×11

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The episode sees Kara Danvers/Supergirl (Melissa Benoist) venture to Fort Rozz, the former Kryptonian prison that served as the source of nearly all of her season 1 villains, in the hopes of finding a way to defeat Samantha Arias/Reign (Odette Annable). While there, she and Imra Ardeen/Saturn Girl (Amy Jackson) will enlist the help of Leslie Willis/Livewire (Brit Morgan) and Gayle Marsh/Psi (Yael Grobglas).

Judging by these photos, this excursion will go pretty interestingly, as the group crosses paths with a pretty surprising foe – Jindah Kol Rozz, played by Superman: The Movie and Superman II alum Sarah Douglas.

Douglas’ involvement in Supergirl – which appears to have been kept a secret until these photos were released – is just the latest example of “legacy casting” that the show has brought about. And according to showrunner Robert Rovner, bringing in people who used to be involved with DC Comics properties has continued to be a great experience.

“We love it, and we think the fans love it,” Rovner said back in October. “We love seeing people that we know and are familiar with step into other roles. And what’s great about them is that they’re all wonderful actors as well. So, you get the excitement of seeing them in the new role but they also bring a lot when they take on these new characters.”

“Fort Rozz” will air on Monday, January 22nd, at 8/7c on The CW.

Supergirl

ComicBook Composite

79.98

All-Time Comic TV Shows #19

Average Rating

All-Time Rated
#21

From: http://comicbook.com/dc/2018/01/14/supergirl-season-3-episode-11-fort-rozz-photos/

Brian Michael Bendis’ First DC Comic Is A Superman Milestone

Brian Michael Bendis’ first story for DC Comics has been revealed, and it will take place amidst a major milestone for the publisher. Marvel Comics has had a number of shakeups recently, gaining a new Editor-In-Cheif while also losing some major writing talent. Jim Starlin cut ties with Marvel after one of many issues the Thanos creator has had with the company. After an earlier spat, things seemed to clear up with writer penning a new Thanos story and Starlin appearing on the Avengers: Infinity War set with the Russo Brothers.

More amicable than the Starlin split was news that Brian Michael Bendis is moving to DC Comics. The writer will work exclusively with Marvel’s rival after penning some of their biggest stories and characters. Aside from runs on multiple Avengers and X-Men comics, Bendis is likely best known for creating Jessica Jones and Miles Morales, as well as returning Carol Danvers, Luke Cage, and Spider-Woman to prominence. Bendis is still currently wrapping up a number of titles for Marvel, but now we finally know his first story for DC.

RELATED: DC Teases ‘The Supermen Theory’ That Will Change Everything

ComicBook is reporting that the first work Bendis will do for DC Comics will be a backup story in Action Comics #1000 with art by DC icon Jim Lee. The main book will be a celebration of 80 years of Superman and the milestone that is a major superhero comic hitting issue #1000 for the first time. Along with work from Action Comics writer Dan Jurgens and Superman team Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason, Bendis’ story will come amidst the sprawling celebration of the Man of Steel’s legacy.

DC Comics Doomsday Clock The Death of Superman 1992 First Brian Michael Bendis DC Comic Revealed

Given Bendis’ high-profile work with the Avengers, X-Men, and Spider-Man, his joining a Superman story is hardly suprising. In fact, some have theorized he’ll take over for the Man of Steel following Action Comics #1000. While fans wait to learn what the future holds for Bendis, DC will accompany the historic issue with a hardcover collection dubbed Action Comics #1000: 80 Years of Superman. The tome will be comprised of 300 pages of new and classic content and will carry a price tag of $29.99.

In the meantime, Bendis is currently finding ways to wrap up his years of work with Marvel. A few surprises are likely in store for fans, but the writer’s big story right now is Spider-Man II, which involves the Earth-616 version of Miles Morales and a team-up between the two Spider-Men. In fact, the most recent issue of the book saw the return of the Ultimate Universe to Marvel Comics. Kicked off in 2000, the imprint was designed to bring new readers into comics with a fresh continuity and Bendis’ Ultimate Spider-Man was a big part of that. It was that very book that brought Miles to life and the death and rebirth of the universe have played out across Secret Wars and Ultimates 2 in recent years.

The loss of Bendis, as well as Starlin, will be bittersweet for Marvel, but the writer leaves behind a number of legacies that continue to play out in comics and beyond. Now, he’ll have the chance to bring the same skills to DC Comics and there’s a good chance Superman will see some big changes as a result.

MORE: Superman’s Lost Kryptonian Wife Child Revealed

Source: ComicBook

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From: https://screenrant.com/michael-bendis-dc-comics-superman/

BENDIS Takes On SUPERMAN For ACTION COMICS #1000 – Report

Man of Steel steelbook cover

Credit: Jim Lee/Alex Sinclair (DC Comics)
Credit: DC Comics

Brian Michael Bendis’ first DC Comics work will be a back-up story in Action Comics #1000, according to ComicBook. Bendis signed a multi-year exclusive with DC following nearly two decades at Marvel Comics.

ComicBook reports that the story will be drawn by DC Comics co-publisher Jim Lee. No further details were given in the report.

Action Comics #1000 has not yet been solicited, but is anticipated to be released in April 2018 to coincide with Superman’s 80th anniversary.

From: https://www.newsarama.com/38157-bendis-takes-on-superman-for-action-comics-1000-report.html

Review – Superman: Action Comics #995: Booster’s Present, Superman’s Past

Owner/Publisher, Editor-at-Large

Ken Denmead

Editor-in-Chief

Matt Blum

Managing Editor

Z

Senior Editors

Jonathan H. Liu, Jenny Bristol, Corrina Lawson, Patricia Vollmer

Gaming Editor

Dave Banks

Associate Publishers*

Tim Johnides, Jeff Williams, Dante Lauretta, Magnus Dahlsröm, Jayson Peters, David Michael, Gerry Tolbert, Andrew Smith, Ray Wehrs, Joel Becker, Scott Gaeta, Beth Kee, Joey Mills, talkie_tim, Danny Marquardt, Adam Bruski, John Bain, Bill Moore, Adam Frank, Lacey Hays, Peter Morson, James Needham, Matt Fleming, Adam Anderson, Jim Reynolds, Seiler Hagan, Bryan Wade, Petrov Neutrino, Jay Shapiro

Editor (Emeritus)

Chris Anderson

Core Contributors

Darren Blankenship, Rory Bristol, Robin Brooks, Preston Burt, Samantha Fisher, Ray Goldfield, Jamie Greene, Michael Harrison, Ryan Hiller, Rob Huddleston, Will James, James Floyd Kelly, Anthony Karcz, Michael Kaufman, Mordechai Luchins, Brad Moon, Tony Nunes, Anton Olsen, Jules Sherred, Mark Vorenkamp, Chris Wickersham, Simon Yule

Occasional Contributors

Tim Bailey, Natania BarronJohn Booth, Samantha Bryant, Stephen Clark, Tom Fassbender, Matt ForbeckMelissa Ford, Bernd Grobauer, Travis Hanson, Kishore Hari, Whit Honea, Sarah James, John Kovalic, Michael LeSauvage, Jim MacQuarrie, Joey Mills, Skip Owens, Ricardo Rebelo, Drew Rich, Andy Robertson, Mariana Ruiz, Derrick Schneider, Bill Shribman, Tony Sims, Randy Slavey, Gerry Tolbert, Michael Witwer

From: https://geekdad.com/2018/01/review-superman-action-comics-995-boosters-present-supermans-past/

The Final Fate of Lana Lang Revealed in ‘Superwoman’ #18

Spoilers ahead for Superwoman #18, on sale now.

With Superwoman #18, the first cancellation of the Rebirth era has come and gone today — and the end of the comic brought an end to the narrative arc for Lana Lang’s titular superheroine.

The issue’s solicitation text offers — sort of — an accurate idea of what goes on between the pages, but with some important surprises along the way.

DC had described the issue, from writer K Perkins and artists Stephen Segovia and Max Raynor, as “a day in the life of Superwoman…but someone else is in the driver’s seat,” and asked, “Will Superwoman manage to break her mind free from Midnight’s digital grasp and dispel her twisted protocol once and for all?”

…Actually, kind of no.

In the story, it turns out that Midnight is able to stabilize herself and reduce her worst impulses — but does so by virtue of proximity to Lana’s powers. The ultimate solution? Well, Lana voluntarily surrenders her powers, which brings security both to Midnight and to Lana herself, who has been under the constant threat of “could these powers kill me?” from the day she got them.

Superwoman was originally marketed as the continuing adventures of the New 52 Lois Lane; following 2011’s Flashpoint reboot, Superman was the character arguably the most impacted, with his marriage to Lois Lane removed from continuity and a world that hated and feared aliens — even the Man of Steel.

Ultimately, the pre-Flashpoint version of Superman (and his wife Lois, along with a child born during the Convergence event) returned to the main DC continuity, taking over after the New 52 Superman died.

At the moment of that character’s death, his powers flared out of him like lightning, striking both the New 52 Lois and Lana Lang. Ultimately, each of them would get powers…but in Superwoman #1, the powers would consume Lois, leaving Lana all alone as Superwoman.

Later, in the “Superman Reborn” storyline, Mr. Mxyzptlk would reveal that the New 52 Superman and Lois were always just a part of the more traditional versions of the characters, separated by a mysterious force implied to be Doctor Manhattan. The left-over energy of the “dead” versions rejoined the main bodies, realigning their personalities and backstories to be one continuous whole rather than two disparate pairs of characters. Lana got to keep her “share” of the powers and continued on as Superwoman — until now.

She will likely continue to appear as a supporting character in the Superman titles. Her boyfriend, John Henry Irons, is the superhero Steel, who was inspired by Superman and has come to his aid on more than one recent occasion.

Superwoman #18 is available today, in stores and online. You can get a copy at your local comics retailer, or order a digital copy here.

From: http://comicbook.com/dc/2018/01/10/the-final-fate-of-lana-lang-revealed-in-superwoman-18/

Syfy’s KRYPTON Will Not Be The Superman Story Comic Book Fans Expect

You may think you know Superman’s lineage, but Krypton is throwing out the classic script. Syfy’s new DC Comics drama isn’t sticking to the source material about the most famous superhero ever. The new series about Superman’s grandfather Seg-El (Cameron Cuffe) isn’t just going to be flashbacks to the House of El’s beginnings, it’s wholly reinventing them.

Set two generations before the destruction of Superman’s home planet, when Krypton begins, Seg-El is a young man faced with a life or death conflict to either save his home planet or let it be destroyed in order to restore the fate of his future grandson after getting approached by Adam Strange (Shaun Sipos), a time-traveler from Earth.

When the series was first announced, fans assumed Krypton would be just another origin story for the House of El that would give Superman to the world. But at the 2018 Winter Television Critics Association press tour, DC Entertainment boss Geoff Johns revealed to the room of journalists that by introducing time travel with Adam Strange, they aren’t beholden to the history of Superman’s origins.

“There’s been a lot of stories in the comic books about Krypton that we do derive inspiration from, but the time travel element does give us an unpredictability and some creative license to do stories that we don’t know stories that could play out differently than what people might assume,” Johns says. “The door is open for anything.”

In fact, because of that, Krypton has the ability to dive into deeper comic book stories than fans have ever seen in live-action before. “This is the gateway into the DC science fiction universe,” executive producer David S. Goyer says. “Even the inclusion of Adam Strange, that should tip you off that it’s not just going to be set on Krypton.”

The showrunners already have an idea for where they want to see Krypton go past the first season. “We do roughly have a seven, eight year plan,” Goyer says. “But a lot of people know that Krypton blows up and that’s what causes Superman to come to earth but this is really an untold story. Time travel is involved which means that the ending of our show, history can be changed and what happens in this show can be very different from the backstory that people know.”

That means the present day Superman stories being told in live-action will not be where Krypton ends up going in the present. And the fact that Krypton isn’t going to tie into the onscreen DC Comics world on television and in films means they can take their story anywhere. There’s no telling where it will end up.

“It’s almost entirely advantageous,” Goyer says of having this show exist on its own terms. “It is it’s own thing. Because of the time travel aspect, we have a tremendous amount of free reign. And it’s really an untold story.”

While the showrunners were cagey about specific plot points, Goyer did reveal that the show begins with the House of El in disgrace, a huge departure for the normally almost-royal family. “Krypton is really about how that ‘S’ [symbol] really gains this meaning,” he says. “When we start, it’s a symbol of shame, a scarlet letter. As we watch our character build it into something we love, that’s the core of the show, the heart of the show.”

What are you most excited to see from this new DC TV series? Tweet me at @SydneyBucksbaum and let’s chat all things Krypton!

Images: Syfy

Krypton premieres Wednesday, March 21 on Syfy.

From: https://nerdist.com/syfy-krypton-trailer-tca-house-of-el-time-travel-adam-strange/

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