Batman V Superman’s Doomsday Initially Looked More Like the …

“Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice” endured a lot of criticism, for its grim tone, for its plot and for the design of Doomsday, a monstrosity created with Kryptonian technology that combined Lex Luthor’s blood with General Zod’s DNA. While Doomsday served the same purpose in the film as he did in the comic books — he killed Superman, at least temporarily — what audiences saw on the screen looked a lot different from the DC Comics source material.

RELATED: How “Batman v Superman’s” Epic Doomsday Fight Was Created

However, early concept art reveals the Doomsday of “Batman v Superman” initially more closely resembled his comic book counterpart.

Here’s a very early #doomsday concept I did for #batmanvsuperman a couple of years back. I did several options for the character. It really was an honor working on such an amazing project with such an incredible team.#dc #dcuniverse #batman #superman #wonderwoman #comicbookmovies #conceptart #photoshop #zbrush #bigguy #badguy #moster #creature #creaturedesign

A post shared by jsmarantz (@jsmarantz) on Mar 28, 2017 at 12:13pm PDT

Concept artist Jerad S. Marantz recently shared some illustrations be created for the Zack Snyder, some of which depict the creature with bony spikes on its head, shoulders and torso that will be familiar to readers of Superman comics.

“Here’s a very early Doomsday concept I did for Batman v Superman a couple of years back,” Marantz wrote. “I did several options for the character. It really was an honor working on such an amazing project with such an incredible team.”

Early #doomsday #conceptart for #batmanvsuperman this piece was a collaboration I did with my incredibly talented friend Constantine Sekeris. There were a lot of amazing artists on this project. #batman #superman #comicbookmovies #photoshop #wondereoman #dcmovies #funeralforafriend #dccinematicuniverse #badguy #zod #comicbooks #monster

A post shared by jsmarantz (@jsmarantz) on Apr 7, 2017 at 10:24am PDT

Marantz has had a lengthy career as a concept artist and character designer, with credits that include “Avatar,” “Green Lantern,” “The Amazing Spider-Man,” “Thor: The Dark World,” “Captain America: Civil War,” “Doctor Strange” and “Guardians of the Galaxy” and its upcoming sequel.

Starring Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill and Gal Gadot, “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice” earned $873.3 million. The DC Extended Universe continues June 2 with director Patty Jenkins’ “Wonder Woman,” followed in November by Snyder’s “Justice League.”

Early #doomsday #conceptmodel for #batmanvsuperman There were a lot of amazing artists on this project. #batman #superman #comicbookmovies #conceptart #zbrush #3d #wonderwoman #dcmovies #funeralforafriend #dccinematicuniverse #badguy #zod #comicbooks #monster

A post shared by jsmarantz (@jsmarantz) on Apr 8, 2017 at 4:02pm PDT

(via ComicBook.com)

Batman V Supermans Doomsday Initially Looked More Like the ComicsBy:

Tags:
batman v superman, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice


From: http://www.cbr.com/batman-v-superman-doomsday/

That Time Don Rickles Met Superman in a Jack Kirby Comic

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Excerpt from Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen.

Photo: Jack Kirby; Vince Colletta/DC Entertainment

Few mediums are as prone to oddity as the American comic book, and few comics creators were as capable of imagining the strange and uncanny than the late writer-artist Jack Kirby. But even for Kirby, issues 139 and 141 (issue 140 was a giant-sized retrospective issue with reprints of old Jimmy Olsen stories) of Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen, published by DC Comics in 1971, are supremely bizarre. It’s not the presence of alien spacecraft or faster-than-light travel that sets it apart — no, it’s the introduction into the DC mythos of none other than Don Rickles.

In fact, not only did Kirby deliver the famed insult comic, he even dreamed up a cape-wearing doppelgänger named Goody Rickels [sic], a “sweet, lovable soul” whose dunderheaded antics inadvertently help defeat space aliens. In honor of Rickles, who just died at the age of 90, let us revisit his delightful and borderline incomprehensible escapade from the hands of a sequential-art master. As Kirby asked on the cover of the first issue: “Are you ready for defoliants in your succotash? Are you ready for landmines in your lunchbox?? Are you ready for this?” If so, let’s begin with the appropriately weird origins of the saga.

The Rickles pitch began not with Kirby, but with his young assistants, Mark Evanier and Steve Sherman. Evanier recalled the backstory in a 1997 panel at the San Diego Comic-Con:

Steve and I, at the time, were enormous fans of Don Rickles. Like many people at that time who were our age, we all went around doing Don Rickles, insulting each other. Rickles used to say, “I never picked on a little guy, I only pick on big guys.” Somehow, this gave us the idea that we should have Don Rickles make a cameo appearance in Jimmy Olsen to insult Superman. It was gonna be like a three-panel thing. So we wrote out a couple of pages of Don Rickles insults. One of them was, “Hey, big boy, where’re you from?” And Superman says, “I’m from the planet Krypton.” And Rickles says, “I got jokes for eight million nationalities and I’ve gotta run into a hockey puck from Krypton!”

So we took these out to Jack. Jack was a big fan of Rickles. And he says, “That’s great, that’s terrific.” And, of course, he used none of it. He said, “We’ve gotta get permission from Don Rickles for this.” So Steve contacted Rickles’s publicist, and they gave us permission to have Don Rickles do a cameo. Then Jack tells [DC Comics publisher] Carmine Infantino about it, and Infantino thinks this is great; this is something promotable; it’s gotta be a two-issue story arc. So instead of us writing two pages, it’s now Jack writing two issues.

And what issues they were. The first cover, in addition to querying about succotash, promised “TWO RICKLES! Don and his long lost alter ego Goody!” and depicted a bespectacled Rickles look-alike in purple-and-green superhero garb leaping into the air while holding a photograph of Don. “That Goody causes more trouble than the villains!” a stern Supes says while running behind the oddball.

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Photo: Jack Kirby; Vince Colletta/DC Entertainment

Only after nine pages of the series’ preexisting story arc about a crime-fighter named the Guardian and his gang of kid sidekicks, the Newsboy Legion (why they’re called that is a whole other strange story), working alongside Superman and Jimmy venturing from a secret science collective to Metropolis. Then the real action starts. We cut to the executive suite of corporate raider Morgan Edge, a media entrepreneur who owns a broadcasting company and has taken over The Daily Planet. After some chatter about Jimmy and Clark Kent, Edge, out of nowhere, asks his assistant, “How are we progressing on those contracts for Don Rickles?” She replies, “Oh, Mister Edge, I just hope Don signs with us! He’s such a funny man!”

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Photo: Jack Kirby; Vince Colletta/DC Entertainment

Edge says he’ll be able to snag the funnyman (presumably for a TV show, though there’s no such explanation); the assistant enthusiastically says they’ll “have two of them now! Don — and his ‘look alike!’” She’s speaking of Goody Rickels, a staff researcher, whom Edge apparently loathes. “If the real Don Rickles and this yo-yo ever bump into each other — it’ll be utter chaos!!” he thinks to himself. And in walks Goody, dressed in a superhero getup that he confusingly says “some of the fellows in another office” forced him to wear. He begs Edge for a promotion and spouts non-sequitur dialogue that doesn’t quite work as humor, though it’s unclear if that’s intentional on Kirby’s part. For example: “Nature gave me a small liver — but a big, big heart!” and “It’s like John Wayne says! The American Dream — it works! You just have to eat apple pie and believe!

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Photo: Jack Kirby; Vince Colletta/DC Entertainment

Edge decides he needs to kill off the maddening Goody and sends the man to investigate a UFO. Supes, Jimmy, and the Guardian show up at the same UFO, and aliens (or “space creeps,” as Goody puts it) attack them. Terrified and clumsy, Goody doesn’t know how to fight, but survives and even defeats some baddies through slapstick luck. The issue ends without Don actually appearing, but the next chapter promises his arrival in its bizarre title: “WILL THE REAL DON RICKLES PANIC?!?” Don arrives at the GBS offices and, while parading past a crowd of autograph-seekers, declares, “Relax, you cockamamies! You’re liberated! The Nazis are gone! That’s right! I just saw General Patton grab von Rundstedt!” Ever the disser, he calls a zaftig lady a “runaway locomotive”; tells Edge’s assistant, “Get yourself a bikini and start a chain of heart attacks at a garden party!”; and curses the assembled masses by yelling, “And may the gods rain on your memos!

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Photo: Jack Kirby; Vince Colletta/DC Entertainment

Then comes the moment you’ve been waiting for: Goody returns to GBS and meets Don. “I-I-I-I — I think I’m going — bananas!” the latter cries upon seeing the Goofus to his Gallant. Goody reveals that the UFO encounter left him infected with some weird science-fiction-y ailment that’s killing him, and the unsympathetic Don wanders off to read a book while all the mishegoss sorts itself out, which it does. Don’s odyssey isn’t done, however — Superman shows up, as does a bomb-disposal squad that got a report of a human bomb (i.e., Goody), and an exhausted Rickles runs after the latter, declaring that he is the bomb, and therefore needs to be evacuated. Goody screams after him for an autograph, but is denied one. The squad lift Don away and one of them, noting the comedian’s declaration of his status as a bomb, delivers the punch line to the whole cameo: “Poor guy! With your routine — this had to happen!”

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Photo: Jack Kirby; Vince Colletta/DC Entertainment

Alas, the real-life Rickles was just as displeased as his four-color counterpart. According to Evanier, Rickles “felt exploited” by the story — it had been pitched to him as a brief cameo in which he insulted Superman, but the finished product was long, bizarre, and featured no such insult. Years later, when asked about the comic on a talk show, he frustratedly told the host to put it away. It’s also not one of the better-remembered Kirby stories, so the whole thing has more or less been left on the dust pile of comics history.

The whole story is easily one of the craziest and least sensical of Kirby’s illustrious five-decade career, but its wacky ambition is admirable. If you’re wondering what the whole deal behind the inclusion of Goody is, you’re never going to find much of an answer: Kirby had an expansive imagination that regularly conceived of ideas that even he couldn’t explain. He also managed to capture Rickles’s face remarkably well and his jokes, though often incomprehensible, are at least fresh and not simple carbon copies of existing bits. Though sadly out of print, it’s worth digging up this oft-forgotten story to see one of the most interesting appearances of a comic in a comic.

From: http://www.vulture.com/2017/04/that-time-don-rickles-met-superman-in-a-jack-kirby-comic.html

METALLO Makes a Mysterious Friend in ACTION COMICS #977

Got a comment? There’s lots of conversation on Newsarama’s FACEBOOK and TWITTER!

From: http://www.newsarama.com/33919-metallo-makes-a-mysterious-friend-in-action-comics-977.html

How Does Superman Cut His Hair?

Comic Book Questions Answered – where I answer whatever questions you folks might have about comic books (feel free to e-mail questions to me at brianc@cbr.com).

Reader Harry L. wrote in to ask, simply, how does Superman get his hair cut?

In the old days of “Superman” comic books, this was answered the same way most questions were handled – no one cared, so it never came up. Seriously, though, comics just tended not to address things like this early on. I’m sure readers were curious, it just never came up in the comics. There really wasn’t much in the way of continuity in the comics at the time, as they were basically all just “one and done” stories, so no one was exactly keeping track of things like “How does Superman’s hair work?”

First off, let’s just show a bit from “Action Comics” #251 (where Superman was artificially aged) to make it clear that Superman’s hair can NOT be cut normally…

“Superman” #201 gave an official answer to what was basically the unofficial way of handling these things – Superman didn’t have to worry about cutting his beard because so long as he was under a yellow sun (and therefore had his powers), his hair did not grow!

There was even a later comic based on that concept, where a reporter noticed that Clark Kent’s hair never grew (she figured it was a wig).

In “Superman” #139, we established that heat vision CAN cut Superman’s hair, as Krypto and Supergirl have to lend Superman a hand when some red kryptonite made his hair grow super long (how awesome is it that the look of Superman with just his beard off looks exactly like how Superman did with long hair after he returned from the dead?)…

In the “Man of Steel” reboot in 1986, John Byrne used the heat vision approach to come up with how Superman cut his hair (as Byrne’s Superman’s hair DID grow)…

That has been the case ever since, although eventually people also began to have Superman use just a basic mirror, as well (which doesn’t make a ton of sense, but hey).

Recently, in “Rebirth,” the piece of the ship method was returned…

So there ya go, Harry!

If anyone else has a question they’d like to see answered, drop me a line at brianc@cbr.com!

How Does Superman Cut His Hair?By:

Tags:
Comic Book Questions Answered, csbg, superman


From: http://www.cbr.com/superman-hair-cut/

Exclusive preview: Superman #20 writer Peter Tomasi sets up a new threat for the Kent family

In the opening panels of Superman #20, things seem idyllic for the Kent family of Hamilton County. Following the events of the “Superman Reborn,” they’ve certainly deserved some downtime. But, this being comics, that’s not going to last.

Instead, in the new issue available April 5, the family plans to head back to Metropolis, but something won’t let them leave. Plus, Batman and Robin show up to reveal that Superboy’s powers are slowly disappearing.

To get the low-down on what’s afoot, writer Peter J. Tomasi hit me up with a couple of teases about the new story arc, “Superman Black,” and set up what might be in store. Check out what he had to say, take a gander at the gorgeous art in an exclusive preview below, and, if you feel super-excited about it, pick up Superman #20 on Wednesday.

Set up the action in this issue and why it’s one to pick up.

Peter Tomasi: We’re coming right out of “Superman Reborn” and honestly, there’s no let-up for the Kents. Just when they thought everything is falling into place after the recent shake-up, they’re going to realize a huge threat is looming to shake them to the core.

What is your favorite panel/page/line in this issue?

Tomasi: Tough question; there’s so many I can’t pick just one. It’s funny, as much as I love action, I find myself really loving the small human moments that Pat Gleason brings to life, so much emotion and subtlety that stick with you long after the issue is over. I will say there is a splash page where some food is being shared that continues to put a smile on my face. Pat and the rest of the team are kicking serious ass on every aspect of the art side with Mick Gray, John Kalisz and Rob Leigh.

Tease how this might set up the next issue.

Tomasi: Let’s just say Batman and milk don’t mix and leave it at that.

Superman #20 is published by DC Comics and written by Patrick Gleason and Peter J. Tomasi; art by Mick Gray and Patrick Gleason with a cover by Patrick Gleason and variant cover by Tony S. Daniel.

From: http://www.blastr.com/2017-4-3/dc-comics-superman-issue-20-peter-tomasi-preview

Comic Legends: How Batman and Superman’s DKR Fight Originally …

Welcome to Comic Book Legends Revealed! This is the six hundred and twenty-first week where we examine comic book legends and whether they are true or false.

Just like the last few months, one legend today, one tomorrow and one Sunday.

Let’s begin!

COMIC LEGEND:

The fight between Superman and Batman originally ended much differently in “Dark Knight Returns.”

STATUS:

Basically True

As most comic book fans know, the final book of Frank Miller and Klaus Janson’s iconic “The Dark Knight” miniseries, titled “The Dark Knight Falls,” features a climactic battle between Batman and Superman, with Batman ultimately having Superman at his mercy before he is felled by a heart attack. Green Arrow played a role in it, as well, shooting Superman with a kryptonite arrow.

The heart attack, of course, was all a ruse by Batman so that he could go underground. In a cute scene at the end of the issue, Batman awakes a TOUCH too early, so Superman actually hears his heartbeat, but allows Batman to get away with it.

In the tenth anniversary collected edition of “Dark Knight Returns,” though, DC shared with us all Frank Miller’s original plot for the final issue, and not only is Green Arrow not in the final fight, but the total final battle was SLIGHTLY different, especially in the fact that Superman was WINNING the final fight when Batman then succumbs to his heart attack…

Everything else after that is as it was in the original comic (I mean, slight differences, but the basic gist was the same).

I think that I like the published version better, especially the use of Green Arrow. What do you folks think?


Check out some legends from Legends Revealed:

Did Steven Spielberg Win a Percentage of the Profits of the First Star Wars in a Bet?

Did the Star-Spangled Banner Have An Extra Verse Added During the Civil War?
Was Disneyland’s First Opening So Screwed Up That They Pretended It Didn’t Happen for More Than a Decade?

Did The Band Behind the Hit Song “Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye” Not Even Really Exist?


Check back Saturday for part 2 of this week’s legends!

And remember, if you have a legend that you’re curious about, drop me a line at either brianc@cbr.com or cronb01@aol.com!

Comic Legends: How Batman and Supermans DKR Fight Originally Ended!By:

Tags:
batmans, Comic Book Legends Revealed, csbg


From: http://www.cbr.com/batman-superman-dark-knight-returns-frank-miller-original-ending/

The Four Superman Stories That Made ‘Man of Steel’

The much-discussed DC Extended Universe of current films are getting all this buzz as Justice League‘s release nears. And the DCEU began with the love-it-or-hate-it 2013 film Man of Steel. No matter how you reacted to it, there was certainly a lot of references to classic comics for Superman fans to find.

Theatrical superhero movies usually combine elements of multiple stories from the comics they’re based on. Zack Snyder’s Man of Steel was no different, and it took guidance from so many classic sources. Of the many inspirations folks might overlook, is primariy an adaptation of four notable Superman stories: Superman: The Man of Steel, The Supergirl Saga, Superman: Last Son, and Superman: Earth One.

Superman: The Man of Steel

In 1986, after rebooting their entire multiverse in the seminal Crisis on Infinite Earths, DC Comics hired superstar writer and illustrator John Byrne to reimagine Superman’s origin. He began one of the best Superman runs ever with a miniseries called The Man of Steel. Every Superman story since then, in any medium, is indebted to this miniseries.

The Man of Steel reinterpreted the doomed planet Krypton as a sterile world where everyone was genetically engineered. The miniseries emphasized Clark Kent’s human upbringing over his alien heritage, ending with him explicitly deciding that he thinks of himself as human. Clark’s parents, Jonathan and Martha Kent, were both established as alive and active in their son’s adult life. Prior to this, they had both been portrayed as dying before Clark became Superman. The Man of Steel also established that Superman’s powers weren’t as godlike as before, with many enemies as strong as he is, if not stronger, eliminating complaints of Superman being “too powerful.” Lois Lane became as heroic as Superman and an occasional action hero, and less of a damsel in distress. The Man of Steel quickly (and rightly) became regarded as a classic.

In their film, David Goyer and Zack Snyder chose to depict John Byrne’s atypical Krypton, even though the comics had since reverted to a more utopian portrayal of the planet. They also picked up on characterizations and themes from The Man of Steel, although this was nearly unavoidable since nearly every Superman story in the interim had done the same.

The Supergirl Saga

In 1988, Byrne, working with Jerry Ordway, concluded his run with a three-parter titled The Supergirl Saga. In this story, Superman discovered that the General Zod, Quex-Ul, and Zaora of an alternate dimension had murdered almost the entire population of that reality’s Earth. Superman watched the last survivors fight back and attempted to help them. He failed and they died. The criminals destroyed the only available Phantom Zone projector, so that Superman could not re-imprison them there. (At this point in his career, Superman did not know how to build a new Phantom Zone projector).

Superman captured the Kryptonian criminals, exposed them to gold kryptonite (removing their powers) and watched them laugh and declare that they would someday do to Superman’s Earth the same thing they had done to theirs. Deciding that he was “the last representative of law and justice on this world,” he exposed them to lethal green kryptonite. The story was controversial at the time and still is with some. Reflecting this, Superman in subsequent stories quickly started to regret his actions, exiling himself into space in the classic Exile story arc.

In their film, Goyer and Snyder chose to conclude their Superman’s struggle with Zod in a similar fashion. While Zod’s genocidal plan is only attempted in the film, Superman causes his death to protect his potential future victims after it becomes no longer possible to return Zod to the Phantom Zone (in the film, because the mechanism for doing this has already been expended in imprisoning Zod’s army of fellow convicts). Superman actually feels guilty for killing Zod even quicker in the film than he did in the comics.

Last Son

This story defined General Zod’s 21st Century characterization, influencing both the New Krypton saga and General Zod’s New 52 appearances. In 2006, 2007, and 2008, (this story experienced some major publishing delays!) Superman experts Geoff Johns and Richard Donner reintroduced the general after decades of absence. Joe Kelly and Brian Azzarello had written stories featuring a Russian-style Zod whose real name was Avruiskin, but that Zod never truly caught on. So Johns and Donner presented a classic Kryptonian Zod leading an army of Phantom Zone criminals in a destructive, full-scale invasion of Metropolis. Spaceships crashed into buildings, the US military got involved, and ultimately the day was saved by returning Zod’s army to the Phantom Zone.

Crucially, this story introduced Zod’s desire to turn Earth into a homeland for surviving Kryptonians. Zod had always had a personal grudge against Superman and his Kryptonian family, and that grudge was preserved in this story, but it was in this story that Zod became something of a visionary with a plan for his people’s future. Zod berates Superman for trying to live a human life in this story, and this disdain for humanity would endure in later Zod stories. Even Zod’s bearded appearance came into the comics in this story (Terrence Stamp aside, Zod had been clean-shaven from the 1960s to the 1980s).

Superman: Earth One

This might be the strongest influence on the film of all. The entire story structure of Man of Steel is directly lifted from J. Michael Straczynki’s 2010 out-of-continuity graphic novel Superman: Earth One. In Earth One, a young, low-on-money Clark Kent is introduced trying out various jobs. Martha Kent is alive but Jonathan Kent is not. Clark’s childhood, including an encounter with a bully, is shown in flashbacks.

Clark discovers his alien heritage at the midpoint of the story. Almost immediately afterward, he becomes Superman specifically to stop an alien invasion centered in Metropolis, despite having no experience at all in the superhero business. The invaders have come to Earth specifically to target Clark. He battles the invaders, destroys their machines, and uses the spaceship that brought him to Earth against the invaders. Daily Planet staff including Lois Lane assist Clark during the chaos. Once the world is safe he starts wearing glasses and joins the Daily Planet, ending the story — whereas most retellings of Superman’s origin story have him do both of these things shortly before he becomes Superman.

Man of Steel is so reminiscent of Earth One that it’s impossible not to notice the resemblance. The graphic novel has the pacing and spectacle of a blockbuster action movie, and it makes nearly every choice about how to characterize a young Superman in the 2010s that Man of Steel did, from the bullies to the identity questions to the to the lack of experience.



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From: http://fandom.wikia.com/articles/four-superman-stories-made-man-steel

Action Comics Presents The End of The New 52 As We Know It

SPOILER WARNING: The following article contains major spoilers for “Action Comics” #976 by Dan Jurgens, Doug Mahnke, Jaime Mendoza, and Wil Quintana


The conclusion of the Superman-centric crossover story arc “Superman Reborn” has arrived in “Action Comics” #976, bringing with it some massive changes to the Man of Steel’s status quo in the past, present and future, as well as some shocking clues for the what to expect from the post-“Rebirth” DC Universe.

Identity Crisis

Picking right up from last week’s “Superman” #19, we learn that Clark’s efforts to rescue his son from Mr. Mxyzptlk’s trap have transformed both he and Lois back into their “New 52” incarnations, and unsurprisingly, those changes weren’t just cosmetic in nature. The Clark and Lois on the page, meeting Jon, are literally the resurrected versions of Clark and Lois from the main continuity of the New 52 — meaning they have no recollection of ever having been in a relationship, much less being married and having a son.

action-comics-lois-forgets

In case you need a refresher, this Clark (which is to say, the New 52 Clark) was killed just before the start of Rebirth in an event called, appropriately, “The Final Days of Superman.” Similarly, New 52 Lois was killed immediately after the start of Rebirth, in “Superwoman” #1, leaving the only active Superman and Lois Lane in the Rebirth line the married pair who were shifted to the Rebirth universe with their son, Jon, from the formerly alternate pre-Flashpoint universe. Since Rebirth began, this version of Clark and Lois have slotted into the vacancies left by their dead counterparts with only a few minor hiccups, including gaining the trust Batman, figuring out how to fit in at the new Daily Planet, etc.

If you think that sounds a little morbid and a little, well, tricky to keep track of, you wouldn’t be wrong. The dissonance found in knowing Clark and Lois have been existing in Rebirth, literally replacing people’s dead friends and coworkers, has been a pretty common off-and-on thematic undercurrent in nearly all the main Super-family titles. But now, it would seem, the coin has been flipped and the replace-ers have become the replace-ees — that is, at least, until Jon gets to have his say in the matter.

Puppet Masters

New 52 Superman is understandably confused and enraged to have been dragged back into being by an imp from the 5th Dimension that he’s never met, with a coworker he only barely associates with, and a child claiming to be his and said coworker’s son. Clark rounds on Mxy, only to be met with typical Mxyzptlk rejoinders, questioning the nature of his reality and identity, claiming that any real answers he provides Clark will be met with trouble.

More specifically, trouble from “him.” Mxy claims that if he explains any of what’s going on beyond the confines of his own little extra-dimensional game, he’s going to attract some unwelcome attention from the person responsible for this whole universe-twisting debacle in the first place.

He doesn’t offer any more hints about this mysterious entity’s identity, so it’s unclear if he’s talking about Mr. Oz or another party, but whoever it is, Mxy is clearly desperately afraid of him — a fact that’s as concerning as it is interesting, given Mxy’s continuous meta-commentary on the very nature of the DC Universe from a perspective that feels almost editorial in nature.

As it happens, Mxyzptlk’s pseudo-editorial jabs were only the tip of the meta-ice burg.

The Children Are The Future

In his desperation, Jon is able to make contact with a set of strange blue lights, similar to the red lights he interacted with upon his teleportation into Mxy’s game. As he tries to speak with them, they slowly take more humanoid shapes and reveal themselves to be none other than the “echoes” of his parents, apparently reaching out from beyond whatever extra-dimensional limbo they’ve been caught in.

The light “remnants” of Jon’s Clark and Lois are able to bestow power in their son to help them “become whole again.” These powers allow Jon to not only genuinely hurt Mxyzptlk, but also fuse their remnants with their New 52 counterparts.

action-comics-lois-clark-jon-together-again

Which, of course, is exactly what he does. After forcing Mxy into a hasty retreat, Jon turns his attention back to his parents to, well, “fix” them.

The two sets of Clark and Lois are merged into one, a shockingly literal move to apparently begin to “delete” all vestiges of New 52 from continuity. The merging prompts a complete reconstruction of their history, apparently overwriting nearly everything that happened between 2011 and 2016, or at least somehow combining that with the experiences of Jon’s parents.

action-comics-new-52-overwritten

In Mr. Oz’s words, Jon has “realigned (…) the memories and experiences of all (…) so it all fits,” but the specifics are still a bit vague. A double-page spread hits the highlights of the new status quo in a sort of timeline — everything from Clark’s origin story, to Ma and Pa Kent, to “The Death of Superman” and Jon’s own birth — but doesn’t explicitly explain how this new history affects the rest of the DCU. The idea is, clearly, that at some point, everyone will suddenly have their memories altered right along with the Kents and their friends (“everything solidified, locked into place”), but that poses more than a few complications for characters who have yet to have their own New 52 stories modified in ways that fit into the new (old?) past.

With the imminent arrival of April’s “Batman” and ”Flash” crossover “The Button,” it seems all the more probable that we are going to see similar efforts to delete and re-write the New 52 history for the rest of DC’s major characters in the coming months. After all, DC is certainly no stranger to the merging and re-aligning of multiple continuities, even if taking it on a character-by-character basis is a different approach to the endeavor.

Regardless of how it transpires, the message is clear: the New 52 as we know it is done for.

The Manhattan Project

As the dust settles, the newly restored Clark proclaims “I’m back. We’re back, and everything is going to be fine,” a statement which begs the question: Will it?

Mr. Oz doesn’t seem to think so.

The very last page of the issue is focused entirely on Oz as he watches from a distance (in his mysterious, decidedly Ozymandias-esque viewing room) and wonders if Superman actually gets the final say here, or if “he” (meaning the mastermind behind everything) does.

action-comics-doctor-manhattan-tease

This narration takes place over a slow zoom to Mars, yet another piece of evidence to add to the growing pile in support of the “Dr. Manhattan caused the New 52” theories that have been swirling around since “DC Universe: Rebirth” #1. Perhaps more troubling, if it is indeed Manhattan who has been pulling the strings, these panels seem to imply that he’s located within the main universe of “Rebirth” rather than somewhere beyond it; camping out in the solar system, just a hop-skip-and-jump away from Earth.

If “he” — Dr. Manhattan or otherwise — really is that close to home, it would seem a counter offensive is bound to happen sooner rather than later. And with Jon’s new ability to “heal” the fractured universe unlikely to just fade away, it’s all the more likely that Superboy will find himself a major target in days to come.

Action Comics Presents The End of The New 52 As We Know ItBy:

Tags:
action comics, rebirth, superman


From: http://www.cbr.com/action-comics-new-52-end-rebirth-superman/

TNTM: DC Comics Superman Rebirth | El Paso Herald-Post – El Paso Herald

Superman in the New 52.  Superman is one of the characters that has undergone a lot of changes in the DC Comics Rebirth initiative.  His story-line has seen quite a bit of upheaval.

Let’s try to get you up to speed without too much unneeded detail.

In the New 52 we saw a younger Superman.  The pre-Flashpoint Superman had vanished from the timeline.  This younger Superman had only recently become a superhero. He was not the squeaky clean boy scout type.  He would not only fight against criminals, but against any injustice, even if it meant breaking the law, battling a corrupt government, or losing his temper with the police.

He had also lost both of his Earth parents before taking a job at the Daily Planet.  He did not have the Kents guiding him.  This New 52 version actually started a relationship with Wonder Woman.

As a result of DC Comic’s Convergence story-line all previous existing universes were brought back and merged into one timeline.  That means the pre-Flashpoint version of Superman existed alongside the New 52 version.

Superman in Rebirth

The pre-Flashpoint version of Superman was married to Lois Lane and they had a son (Jonathan Kent).  Jonathan inherited many of his fathers powers and abilities.  They decided to remain under the radar in this new merged universe.  Pre-Flashpoint Kent kept tabs on his former villains to ensure they did not do as they did in his universe.

The New 52 Superman dies in the Rebirth story-line after expending all his energy in a fight to save innocents.  His body is turned to ash.  Pre-Flashpoint Superman does some soul-searching and decides to step in to replace the fallen hero.

In the meantime Mr. Mxyzptlk has kidnapped Jonathan Kent.  Mxy is upset that Superman did not come to save him while he was imprisoned by who we assume to be Ozymandias/Dr. Manhattan.  While rescuing Jonathan, Superman comes to the realization that he was split in two between the New 52 (red energy) and pre-“Flashpoint” (blue energy).

Jonathan is able to sense the red energy of New 52 Lois and Clark.  He is able to merge the two (red blue energies).  The result is Lois and Clark being in existence with  a unified history overwriting their individual lives.

We see the mysterious Mr.Oz watching the whole event.  He seems surprised by what has happened saying “Love does conquer all”. Mr. Oz did hint at the beginning of Rebirth that Superman is at the center of the whole Rebirth story-line.
https://youtu.be/f8MBT4dNSAI

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From: http://elpasoheraldpost.com/dc-comics-superman-rebirth/

TNTM: DC Comics Superman Rebirth – El Paso Herald

Superman in the New 52.  Superman is one of the characters that has undergone a lot of changes in the DC Comics Rebirth initiative.  His story-line has seen quite a bit of upheaval.

Let’s try to get you up to speed without too much unneeded detail.

In the New 52 we saw a younger Superman.  The pre-Flashpoint Superman had vanished from the timeline.  This younger Superman had only recently become a superhero. He was not the squeaky clean boy scout type.  He would not only fight against criminals, but against any injustice, even if it meant breaking the law, battling a corrupt government, or losing his temper with the police.

He had also lost both of his Earth parents before taking a job at the Daily Planet.  He did not have the Kents guiding him.  This New 52 version actually started a relationship with Wonder Woman.

As a result of DC Comic’s Convergence story-line all previous existing universes were brought back and merged into one timeline.  That means the pre-Flashpoint version of Superman existed alongside the New 52 version.

Superman in Rebirth

The pre-Flashpoint version of Superman was married to Lois Lane and they had a son (Jonathan Kent).  Jonathan inherited many of his fathers powers and abilities.  They decided to remain under the radar in this new merged universe.  Pre-Flashpoint Kent kept tabs on his former villains to ensure they did not do as they did in his universe.

The New 52 Superman dies in the Rebirth story-line after expending all his energy in a fight to save innocents.  His body is turned to ash.  Pre-Flashpoint Superman does some soul-searching and decides to step in to replace the fallen hero.

In the meantime Mr. Mxyzptlk has kidnapped Jonathan Kent.  Mxy is upset that Superman did not come to save him while he was imprisoned by who we assume to be Ozymandias/Dr. Manhattan.  While rescuing Jonathan, Superman comes to the realization that he was split in two between the New 52 (red energy) and pre-“Flashpoint” (blue energy).

Jonathan is able to sense the red energy of New 52 Lois and Clark.  He is able to merge the two (red blue energies).  The result is Lois and Clark being in existence with  a unified history overwriting their individual lives.

We see the mysterious Mr.Oz watching the whole event.  He seems surprised by what has happened saying “Love does conquer all”. Mr. Oz did hint at the beginning of Rebirth that Superman is at the center of the whole Rebirth story-line.
https://youtu.be/f8MBT4dNSAI

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Talk Nerdy to Me YouTube

From: http://elpasoheraldpost.com/dc-comics-superman-rebirth/

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