Please Stop Adapting the Death of Superman

Superman died once, did you know that? You probably did; considering the eruption the story caused in American pop culture in the early ‘90s, it would be hard to not know the Man of Steel once died. This was back when consumers were still just gullible enough to believe Superman would actually be dead forever, and before publishers realized the death and resurrection trope was a goldmine they could exploit into oblivion. It is without a doubt one of the most iconic Superman stories ever told, but it’s also one we really don’t need to see adapted aver again.

However, Warner Bros. and DC Entertainment are well on their way to releasing a new adaptation of The Death of Superman through the DC Universe Animated Original Movies line. The story will be split into two films, The Death of Superman in late 2018, and Reign of the Supermen in early 2019. It’s clear that Warner Bros. sees this story as Superman’s response to Batman’s The Dark Knight Returns films from a few years back. However, what does it say about the character that his most iconic story, which apparently needs multiple adaptations in quick succession, is about him dying?

The Many Deaths of Superman

To understand the infatuation with the Death of Superman, you have to look beyond the initial story. It wasn’t exactly an original idea to kill the Man of Steel in 1992; the publisher had been doing it for decades, only those stories didn’t count. Much like Marvel’s What If? stories, DC told Imaginary Stories (basically non-continuity), which is how we got the first “The Death of Superman.”

RELATED: No, Really – What’s Going on With the DCEU?

In 1961, Superman creator Jerry Siegel returned to the character for Superman #149. By this point, the Silver Age of comics had transformed the character into an embodiment of pure fantasy. Each issue became an exercise in the suspension of disbelief, as Superman gained new extraordinary powers and was shown to be capable of doing just about anything. At this time, Superman comics were more a laundry list of amazing feats than actual storytelling endeavors.

By the time the original “The Death of Superman” story debuted, it made sense to explore what it would be like if the hero didn’t always win, and if the superhero was actually capable of dying. In Superman #149, Lex Luthor finally manages to kill the Man of Steel, and it was permanent — even if it didn’t really count.

Inevitably, in-continuity stories were told about Superman dying, if only for a short amount of time. In 1966 Otto Binder and Curt Swan created “The School For Superman Assassins” in Superman #188. An assassin actually managed to kill Superman in this story, but the hero was brought back to life. In 1977, Steve Englehart and Dick Dillon told the story “The Carnival of Souls” in Justice League of America #145, where Superman is killed by magic and the League must save his soul.

This practice of bringing the most powerful man in the world to his knees continued on over the years. In Alan Moore and Curt Swan’s seminal Superman story “Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow,” DC said goodbye to the Silver Age version of the character in the wake of Crisis on Infinite Earths. The 1986 tale deals with the disappearance of Superman, and though it is revealed that the man never actually died, the superhero did. It’s a story that deals with the mortality and lasting legacy of the greatest superhero that ever existed.

Even after DC finally decided to kill Superman “for real,” the idea has been revisited many times over, though usually lacking the nuance of the original. By 1999, DC upped the ante to comically horrendous and brutal extremes with the continuous murder of Superman through time travel in The Kingdom and the brutal death of the original Golden Age Superman in Infinite Crisis. “The Final Days of Superman,” which saw the end of the New 52 era Superman eventually looked back to the past with a title borrowed from “The Last Days of Superman” in Superman #156. The mortality of a seemingly invincible man has always been, and will always be, a central part of Superman as a character.

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From: https://www.cbr.com/no-more-death-of-superman-adaptations/

EXCLUSIVE: Superman & Booster Gold Must Escape Planet Zod in Action Comics #998

Beaten and captured on an alien world in the future, no closer to the answers he’s been seeking about Mr. Oz’s claims, Superman and Booster Gold are slated for an execution, courtesy of General Zod, his family (Ursa and Lor), and the Eradicator. But not all hope is lost, as a momentary distraction by Booster Gold’s A.I. companion Skeets has freed our heroes, and the time to strike back is now! Can this time-travelling duo escape their deadly circumstances, and are the planet’s citizens, living under the firm rule of the House Zod, inspired to resist their oppressors? Find out in Action Comics #998, “Booster Shot” Part Six!

CBR has your exclusive first look at DC Comics’ Action Comics #998, written by Dan Jurgens, with art by Will Conrad. In stores Feb. 28th.

ACTION COMICS #998

  • Dan Jurgens (w) • Will Conrad (a c)
  • Variant Cover: Kaare Andrews
  • “BOOSTER SHOT” part six! Escape from Planet Zod! Superman and Booster Gold must escape to travel back to the present, where the life of the captured Sam Lane hangs in the balance!
  • Rating: Teen
  • In Shops: February 28th, 2018
  • SRP: $2.99

From: https://www.cbr.com/preview-action-comics-998/

EXCLUSIVE: Superman & Booster Gold Must Escape Planet Zod in Action Comics #998

Beaten and captured on an alien world in the future, no closer to the answers he’s been seeking about Mr. Oz’s claims, Superman and Booster Gold are slated for an execution, courtesy of General Zod, his family (Ursa and Lor), and the Eradicator. But not all hope is lost, as a momentary distraction by Booster Gold’s A.I. companion Skeets has freed our heroes, and the time to strike back is now! Can this time-travelling duo escape their deadly circumstances, and are the planet’s citizens, living under the firm rule of the House Zod, inspired to resist their oppressors? Find out in Action Comics #998, “Booster Shot” Part Six!

CBR has your exclusive first look at DC Comics’ Action Comics #998, written by Dan Jurgens, with art by Will Conrad. In stores Feb. 28th.

ACTION COMICS #998

  • Dan Jurgens (w) • Will Conrad (a c)
  • Variant Cover: Kaare Andrews
  • “BOOSTER SHOT” part six! Escape from Planet Zod! Superman and Booster Gold must escape to travel back to the present, where the life of the captured Sam Lane hangs in the balance!
  • Rating: Teen
  • In Shops: February 28th, 2018
  • SRP: $2.99

From: https://www.cbr.com/preview-action-comics-998/

‘Death Of Superman’ Animated Movie First Look Released

The special features of upcoming DC Universe Animated Original Movie Suicide Squad: Hell to Pay offers a first look at Death of Superman, the newest animated adaptation of the famous 1992 DC Comics storyline that saw the Man of Steel fall in battle against the creature known as Doomsday.

Death of Superman
(Photo: DC Entertainment)

The first half of the two-part movie will release later this year, followed by Reign of the Supermen in 2019.

Warner Bros. Animation first tried their hand at adapting the story in 2007’s direct-to-DVD Superman: Doomsday, the inaugural DC Universe Animated Original Movie, under the guiding hands of co-director and producer Bruce Timm.

The latest adaptation will be “more faithful to the source material” and will be “much less condensed” than Doomsday, according to DC Comics, who write Death of Superman will “include many of the fan-favorite moments from the story that were left out of Doomsday.”

That film, loosely inspired by Timm’s DC Animated Universe, greatly condensed the Death and Return of Superman storyline that ran between December 1992 and October 1993 in DC Comics, throughout titles like Superman, Adventures of Superman, Justice League America and Action Comics.

The second part of the two-part adaptation, Reign of the Supermen, is likely to see Superman’s resurrection after his absence gives rise to Superboy, Steel, the Last Son of Krypton and the villainous Cyborg Superman.

Warner Bros. Animation has yet to announce a voice cast or release date for Death of Superman, but the animated original will premiere on Digital HD, Ultra HD 4K and Blu-ray later this year.

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When a hulking monster emerges from an underground resting place and begins a mindless rampage, the Justice League is quickly called in to stop the colossal force of nature. But it soon becomes apparent that only Superman can stand against the monstrosity that has been nicknamed Doomsday. Battling their way throughout America, the two fight to a standstill as they reach the heart of Metropolis. Going punch for punch, Superman finally ends the threat of Doomsday as he throws one last punch and collapses forever.

Suicide Squad: Hell to Pay, starring Tara Strong as Harley Quinn and Christian Slater as Deadshot, is available to own on digital platforms March 27, and hits 4K Ultra HD, Blu-ray and DVD April 10.

From: http://comicbook.com/dc/2018/02/25/death-of-superman-DC-animated-movie-first-look/

DC Reveals Covers for Bendis’ First Six Man of Steel Stories – CBR

DC Comics has provided a first look at all six issues of Brian Michael Bendis’ Man of Steel miniseries.

The six colored covers by Ivan Reis and Joe Prado depict memorable moments from Superman’s history to create one long image. There’s Superman joining the Justice League, followed by a young Clark Kent discovering his spaceship and baby Kal-El leaving Krypton. Then, Clark and Lois falling in love, the death of Superman and modern day Superman and Supergirl fighting a villain.

REVEALED: DC Reveals Action Comics #1000 Variants From Allred, Gibbons More

The color version of the third cover from the left shows off Bendis’ new villain that will have ties to Krypton. His appearance seems to have changed significantly from the pencilled version previously revealed a few weeks back. The villain’s teeth, nose and jawline seem to be drastically altered.

Bendis’ run on Superman will begin with April’s historic Action Comics #1000 before he takes over Superman with a new issue one and then continues with Action Comics #1001.

RELATED: Superman’s Red Trunks’ Return Will Be explained In-Story

Man of Steel will look back on the life of DC’s preeminent superhero. A prelude chapter will be released on May 2 as part of the DC Nation #0 sampler illustrated by Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez before the miniseries kicks off on May 30.

Art for the series will be handled by a lineup of all-star artists, including Reis, Evan “Doc” Shaner, Ryan Sook, Kevin Maguire, Adam Hughes and Jason Fabok.

From: https://www.cbr.com/dc-comics-brian-michael-bendis-man-of-steel-color-covers/

Why Superman Legend Dan Jurgens Put Lois Lane Front and Center on his ‘Action Comics’ #1000 Cover

Dan Jurgens, the writer/artist who was responsible for restoring Superman’s marriage after it had been removed from continuity, will prominently feature Lois Lane on his variant cover for Action Comics #1000, which comes out in April.

After receiving some thanks from fans of Lois on Twitter, he explained why he chose to put her front and center on the cover.

“I love that Dan Jurgens Action Comics #1000 variant put Lois Lane on the cover,” tweeted superfan, comics writer, and YouTube personality Jason Inman. “Action Comics #1 was her debut too, and she’s just as important as Superman.”

Responded Jurgens, “That’s exactly why I did so.”

Jurgens, the current writer on Action Comics, began drawing Superman comics in 1987 and has been a writer, artist, or both on the character on and off ever since. Jurgens was part of the creative team that oversaw the Lois/Clark engagement and he drew the wedding itself when the time came.

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Jurgens was one of the primary creative forces behind the Man of Steel in the ’90s, with a lengthy run on Superman that ended in 1999. He was a monthly contributor — as writer, artist, or both — from 1989 until he left.

In addition to a story by Brian Michael Bendis, tales from Jurgens and current Superman scribe Peter J. Tomasi, the return of Superman’s red trunks, and lots more, Action Comics #1000 will feature a story by DC chief creative officer Geoff Johns and Superman: The Movie director Richard Donner.

From: http://comicbook.com/dc/2018/02/22/why-superman-legend-dan-jurgens-put-lois-lane-front-and-center-o/

Erin Narey: Wakanda Forever

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From: http://www.caledonianrecord.com/features/entertainment/erin-narey-wakanda-forever/article_708044b4-84c7-5677-8539-606b9623f659.html

‘Action Comics’ #1000 Variant Covers Revealed – ComicBook.com

DC has revealed first looks at the 7 out of the 8 upcoming variant covers commissioned from comics superstars, each of which will celebrate a decade in the life of Superman as Action Comics reaches 1,000 issues in April.

The covers, some of which feature period-accurate creators and/or trade dress, will ship with the oversized paperback, which marks the end montly Superman comics for writers Dan Jurgens (Action Comics), Peter J. Tomasi Patrick Gleason (Superman).

Along with the covers, DC’s May solicitations gave release dates for DC Nation #0, which will give a look at ahead at Brian Michael Bendis’s Man of Steel miniseries and for Action Comics and Superman one-shots which will provide the swan songs for the outgoing writers.

In the attached image gallery, fans can get their first look at the following covers:

  • 1930s by Steve Rude (FUTURE QUEST, FUTURE QUEST PRESENTS
  • 1940s by Michael Cho (BATMAN BLACK AND WHITE)
  • 1950s by Dave Gibbons (WATCHMEN)
  • 1960s by Michael Allred (BUG!: THE ADVENTURES OF FORAGER)
  • 1970s by Jim Steranko (CATWOMAN: SELINA’S BIG SCORE)
  • 1990s by Dan Jurgens (ACTION COMICS) and Kevin Nowlan (HAWKMAN: FOUND)
  • 2000s by Lee Bermejo (LUTHOR)


Action Comics #1000 Decade Variants

Action Comics #1000 Decade Variants
Gallery

A 1980s cover by Joshua Middleton has not yet been released as of this writing.

Some of the covers feel rather obvious — Jurgens and Bermejo both had major Superman stories or runs during their periods, while Allred and Rude are well known for their ability to ape the styles of their own decades.

Steranko, a superstar in the ’70s, did most of his work at Marvel and has hardly ever drawn for DC, although he did contribute a Superman pin-up to The Superman Gallery, a one-shot that was released in 1992 during a period when the character, having just died at the hands of Doomsday, was the hottest thing in comics.

Jurgens, who wrote and drew that death, was one of the most important creative voices on Superman in the 1990s. Interestingly, Kevin Nowlan also inked Jurgens’s cover to his final issue of Superman in 1999.

You can see the images in the attached gallery.

In addition to a story by Brian Michael Bendis, the return of Superman’s red trunks, and lots more, Action Comics #1000 will feature a story by DC chief creative officer Geoff Johns and Superman: The Movie director Richard Donner.

From: http://comicbook.com/dc/2018/02/20/action-comics-1000-variant-covers-revealed/

Superman is finally getting his red underwear back

Superman

Truth, justice and the way of the fist. I don’t care what anyone says, as Superman is still one of the greatest comic book characters when placed in the right hands. It doesn’t even matter if it’s the original man of steel a successor from the far-flung future or another version from an alternate reality, as the very idea of Superman still makes for some powerful reading.

A god without limits, living in a world that very much does have such fragile systems in place. Even with the power to destroy a mountain with an errant fart, Superman is still at his core a good person. Over the years, the last son of Krypton has been through numerous changes, especially in the costume department.

The 1990s introduced the idea of electric boogaloo Superman, an electrically powered man of tomorrow decked out in a costume that I still secretly adore. It wasn’t long before Superman returned to his regular threads, the classic blue and red outfit that most people recognise instantly. Things changed in 2011 with The New 52 however.

While the traditional Supeman costume was still largely intact, it had been modernised. A higher collar, more seam lines and a complete absence of the signature underoos that Superman had worn for decades. Further tweaks would be applied to the super-suit, but the red trunks would remain absent through all of these alterations. Until now that is, as Superman is finally getting his underwear back.

Beginning with Action Comics #1000, Superman will once again be wearing his tightey-reddies outside of his pants, just like I do. Fun fact, my underwear used to be white. Double fun fact, I use far too much Sriracha sauce on all my food. “I’m not going to get too deep in the weeds on this,” new Superman writer Brian Michael Bendis said on the Word Balloon podcast.

Action-Comics-Superman-(1)

Basically, I was offered the trunks. I was not fully aware of the trunks controversy that has been dogging Superman for the last little while.

“We haven’t done the shorts in awhile,” Didio added .

It’s been a little bit of a controversy, I’m sure you can understand. I think people will be happy to see them, and it’ll speak to what you have to say with Superman.

Will there be a reason why Superman goes back to the classics? Absolutely, but you’ll have to read the comic to find out why of course. Personally, I dig the classic look. It’s cheesy, but it’s also indicative of a more hopeful era in Superman comics. Originally an homage to the outfits worn by circus performers, it looks downright odd to not see Superman sporting some red. If anyone can make the look work and fashionable again, it’s the man of steel.

 

Super-undies

Last Updated: February 20, 2018

From: https://www.criticalhit.net/comics-toys/superman-finally-getting-red-underwear-back/

DC Comics’ Newest Writer Is Poised To Make Superman Jewish Again

(JTA) — DC Comics’ newest writer says that the choices he has made for his new Superman series are “deeply connected to [the character’s] origins.”

And those origins are very Jewish.

Brian Michael Bendis, who recently jumped ship from Marvel to DC Comics, will start drawing new comic books with the iconic superhero in May. He happens to be a product of a strictly Orthodox Jewish day school in Cleveland.

“I’m a little Jewish boy from Cleveland and my connection to Superman is very, very deep, genetically,” Bendis told Forbes earlier this month.

Bendis’ personal background could have implications for the Superman character. From his given name Kal-El to his exodus from his home planet, Superman exudes the Jewish sensibilities of his creators, immigrants Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster (also Clevelanders).

“El” is a Hebrew term used to designate God. And just as Moses was nestled in a little basket for his trip down the Nile, Superman’s parents placed him in a rocket ship so he could escape his dying planet of Krypton. Instead of Pharoah’s daughter lifting a crying baby out of a basket, Superman’s adoptive parents opened the rocket to discover a crying baby. The character’s transformation from mild-mannered, glasses-wearing Clark Kent to avenging strongman has also been seen as a sort of Jewish immigrant’s wish fulfillment. The list of Jewish connections goes on.

Bendis told Forbes that it took some cosmic convincing to leave his longtime perch at Marvel for DC. While he was considering what to do, he said, he returned to Cleveland for his brother’s wedding. He went to visit a friend who runs the Cleveland Public Library, and when he walked through the doors he ran into a Superman exhibition.

“It was like the universe was speaking to me, telling me ‘Oh you’ve got to do this!’ And it flooded back to me in the biggest way possible, and here we are,” he told Forbes interviewer Mark Hughes.

Bendis is perhaps best known from his days at Marvel as the man who killed off Spiderman — or at least his alter-ego, Peter Parker — in order to replace him with a new half-black, half-Hispanic character who gets bitten by a genetically altered spider. He said he was trying to make the comics look more like the real world.

Bendis was raised by a single mother in Cleveland and discovered comic books as an adolescent.

“I studied them like the Torah,” he told JTA in a 2013 interview.

He said the rabbis at his school did not enjoy his drawings, in particular the sketches of men in tights. He frequently got sent home for his artwork.

Bendis told Forbes that his new Superman “is a reflection of where he came from and the world we live in now.”

“Writing Superman in today’s day and age is such a powerful experience. We live in a world where we’ve heard, ‘Truth, justice, and the American way’ our whole lives, right? But this is the first time those things are really not to be taken for granted,” he elaborated.

“Now I think it’s time Superman stand up and give us that hope we always want from him. It’s a great thing to be writing a character who exudes hope at a time when people really, really need it.”

From: https://nyblueprint.com/books-week/dc-comics-newest-writer-poised-make-superman-jewish-again

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