Sunday Conversation: DC Entertainment publishers talk about redefining Superman at 80

Here’s the challenge for Dan DiDio and Jim Lee, the publishers of DC Entertainment comics as the company celebrates 80 years of Superman and the release of “Action Comics” #1000: What can be done to shake up the Man of Steel?

“’Action Comics’ was defined by Superman since he was on the cover of the first issue. [He’s the] first superhero character. It ultimately not just defined Superman himself, but the genre of superheroes,” says DiDio. “That’s why we love celebrating ‘Action Comics’ #1000, ’cause it wasn’t just about Superman, but really, this entire business is built on that idea.”

DC is also releasing a compilation of Superman comics highlighting some of the key storylines that defined the character. Earlier this year, it was announced that Brian Michael Bendis, a longtime influential Marvel writer who recently defected to DC Comics, would be shaping Superman’s new direction.

“Brian’s really going to put his mark on the character and redefine the mythology of the character,” said Lee. “That’s exciting ’cause it shows that even after 80 years, there are new ways to rekindle and reignite the mythology.”

We sat down with the duo, with Lee calling in from South-by-Southwest (“It’s like Comic-Con without the superheroes!”) and DiDio at the Burbank headquarters of DC Comics to talk Superman, legacy and moving forward.

[“Action Comics”] ultimately not just defined Superman himself but the genre of superheroes.

Dan Didio

'Action Comics'
The first issue of “Action Comics” and the first featuring Superman sits in the archive at DC Comics. Myung J. Chun / Los Angeles Times


Jim Lee: It’s interesting that you note that collectors and fans like the appeal of the first issue, but I’ll tell you that historically, the next most important number is 100, and historically, this is the first time that a thousand has been reached. We’re already seeing huge interest in this issue as a milestone issue and that fact that it’s the first book to hit this number. I feel like the marathon runner who just stepped across the finish line and got to work on the thousandth issue given all of the incredible stories that were created prior to it.

Dan DiDio: The reality is that we wanted to embrace the history of the character. The best part about “Action Comics” #1000 itself is that while the story that Jim and Brian Bendis are doing is leading into ultimately the new direction of Superman, there are so many different standalone stories in that [80 years of Superman] book that really capture the essence of this character. So with all the promotion and attention around #1000, I think you’re going to get this beautiful package of so many stories with all the depth and all the history of who Superman is. If you’re a brand new fan or just have casual awareness of Superman, this is the place to start.

Lee: I feel like that’s Brian’s story to tell. All I can say is that it will be startling. It will be interesting. It will be illuminating. It will usher in a new era for the character, which is what you want. We didn’t want to do a celebratory issue that didn’t mean anything. In walks Brian with this great idea, this great premise, to redefine the character and it unlocked all these other ideas.

DiDio: Let me spoil it a little bit. Brian’s stuff really does challenge the origin of Superman and calls in some new elements that reinterpret everything that’s happened to him up until this point. The piece that you’re going to see in “Action Comics” #1000 takes place after the events in “Man of Steel,” so you get kind of a preview of what’s to come. We introduce a new villain and there’s lots of story beats inside there. More important, when you have as many people buying into this, it becomes a great launchpad for everything that Brian wants to do as well as to get a sense of the scope of the DC Universe.

DiDio: It’s the accessibility and relatability of the character that creates our constant need to really contemporize him and move the stories forward. With so much other media with our characters these days, it’s essential for us to stay as innovative as possible. So we always feel like we have to be in front of them in our storytelling — reviewing them and finding ways to freshen them up. I think Superman is the perfect example. You’ve seen so many iterations, but he’s always true to what he is, though he’s still built on today’s ideas.

Lee: We’re longtime fans of his work at Marvel and really jealous that they had such a prolific writer [who] was driving so much of their narrative, their mythology and their universe. So, we knew he’s a creator with big ideas. That’s what you want on your biggest character and your biggest issue. He just came in with a passion that you see was a trademark for the work he did at Marvel. He’s not a guy [who’s] scared of exploring, experimenting and really burrowing down into what makes characters tick. As Dan alluded to before, we do not keep these characters encased in amber for all eternity. We need to really keep them modern and fresh, and that requires risk and that requires change and that requires modernizing the mythologies. And we have a fearless writer in Brian, and that’s something that doesn’t happen very often.

Jim Lee's rendition of Superman
Jim Lee’s rendition of Superman for “Action Comics” #1000. DC Comics

We need to really keep [characters] modern and fresh, and that requires risk and that requires change and that requires modernizing the mythologies.

Jim Lee

DiDio: It goes back to what we’re celebrating — 80 years of Superman. A lot of times when you have a character for that long, you don’t change the character that much. So what we try to do is bring in fresh voices, a fresh set of eyes and new perspectives.

DiDio: We do a level of evaluation on all our books, but you have to understand our perspective as publishers. It’s not just about the DC Universe, it’s our entire publishing line. When you encapsulate our entire lines, from what we’re doing now with the introduction of the young adult line, the introduction of a mature line — if you look at the aggregate, we are really diversifying our talent pool and our perspectives on our characters. The goal is to play to everybody’s strengths and what works best and really find a way to expand out the universe with a much more ambitious publishing schedule.

Lee: To echo what Dan said. I don’t know how familiar you are with our other lines — DC Zoom, DC Ink, the Sandman Universe, even the upcoming Milestone line. There’s a lot of diversity in our ranks, and it really mirrors the audience that buys and reads our content. It’s been a real interesting past couple of years as we’ve ramped up all of these different initiatives, and now that they’re up and running, I think you can just look at the range of creators that we have. I don’t think we’ve ever had as diverse and interesting of a group of creators lined for the entire publishing slate than we do now.

DiDio: As comics, we should be the leaders in some ways for a lot of the creative choices. The interesting part about Superman is that he has this weird synergy with the other mediums. We talk about Jimmy Olsen and kryptonite coming from the radio show, and we’ve seen characters being created in other media that we’ve been able to work back through, but still, from our standpoint, we want to be at the forefront of what’s going on. It’s great to see these things happening — the launch of the “Krypton” show and the fact that “Supergirl” is on the air and other things happening — but for us, it’s about the comics. It’s a publishing moment and we want to celebrate it in that fashion.

Lee: “The Bachelor” because I enjoy celebrating young people who are on TV for the right reasons.

DiDio: Mets baseball

DC honchos
Co-publishers at DC Entertainment, Dan DiDio, left, and Jim Lee. Myung J. Chun / Los Angeles Times

jevon.phillips@latimes.com

Follow me on Twitter: @Storiz

From: http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/herocomplex/la-et-hc-sunday-conversation-superman-20180413-htmlstory.html

Sunday Conversation: DC Comics publishers talk about redefining Superman at 80

Here’s the challenge for Dan DiDio and Jim Lee, the publishers of DC Entertainment comics as the company celebrates 80 years of Superman and the release of “Action Comics” #1000: What can be done to shake up the Man of Steel?

“’Action Comics’ was defined by Superman since he was on the cover of the first issue. [He’s the] first superhero character. It ultimately not just defined Superman himself, but the genre of superheroes,” says DiDio. “That’s why we love celebrating ‘Action Comics’ #1000, ’cause it wasn’t just about Superman, but really, this entire business is built on that idea.”

DC is also releasing a compilation of Superman comics highlighting some of the key storylines that defined the character. Earlier this year, it was announced that Brian Michael Bendis, a longtime influential Marvel writer who recently defected to DC Comics, would be shaping Superman’s new direction.

“Brian’s really going to put his mark on the character and redefine the mythology of the character,” said Lee. “That’s exciting ’cause it shows that even after 80 years, there are new ways to rekindle and reignite the mythology.”

We sat down with the duo, with Lee calling in from South-by-Southwest (“It’s like Comic-Con without the superheroes!”) and DiDio at the Burbank headquarters of DC Comics to talk Superman, legacy and moving forward.

[“Action Comics”] ultimately not just defined Superman himself but the genre of superheroes.

Dan Didio

'Action Comics'
The first issue of “Action Comics” and the first featuring Superman sits in the archive at DC Comics. Myung J. Chun / Los Angeles Times


Jim Lee: It’s interesting that you note that collectors and fans like the appeal of the first issue, but I’ll tell you that historically, the next most important number is 100, and historically, this is the first time that a thousand has been reached. We’re already seeing huge interest in this issue as a milestone issue and that fact that it’s the first book to hit this number. I feel like the marathon runner who just stepped across the finish line and got to work on the thousandth issue given all of the incredible stories that were created prior to it.

Dan DiDio: The reality is that we wanted to embrace the history of the character. The best part about “Action Comics” #1000 itself is that while the story that Jim and Brian Bendis are doing is leading into ultimately the new direction of Superman, there are so many different standalone stories in that [80 years of Superman] book that really capture the essence of this character. So with all the promotion and attention around #1000, I think you’re going to get this beautiful package of so many stories with all the depth and all the history of who Superman is. If you’re a brand new fan or just have casual awareness of Superman, this is the place to start.

Lee: I feel like that’s Brian’s story to tell. All I can say is that it will be startling. It will be interesting. It will be illuminating. It will usher in a new era for the character, which is what you want. We didn’t want to do a celebratory issue that didn’t mean anything. In walks Brian with this great idea, this great premise, to redefine the character and it unlocked all these other ideas.

DiDio: Let me spoil it a little bit. Brian’s stuff really does challenge the origin of Superman and calls in some new elements that reinterpret everything that’s happened to him up until this point. The piece that you’re going to see in “Action Comics” #1000 takes place after the events in “Man of Steel,” so you get kind of a preview of what’s to come. We introduce a new villain and there’s lots of story beats inside there. More important, when you have as many people buying into this, it becomes a great launchpad for everything that Brian wants to do as well as to get a sense of the scope of the DC Universe.

DiDio: It’s the accessibility and relatability of the character that creates our constant need to really contemporize him and move the stories forward. With so much other media with our characters these days, it’s essential for us to stay as innovative as possible. So we always feel like we have to be in front of them in our storytelling — reviewing them and finding ways to freshen them up. I think Superman is the perfect example. You’ve seen so many iterations, but he’s always true to what he is, though he’s still built on today’s ideas.

Lee: We’re longtime fans of his work at Marvel and really jealous that they had such a prolific writer [who] was driving so much of their narrative, their mythology and their universe. So, we knew he’s a creator with big ideas. That’s what you want on your biggest character and your biggest issue. He just came in with a passion that you see was a trademark for the work he did at Marvel. He’s not a guy [who’s] scared of exploring, experimenting and really burrowing down into what makes characters tick. As Dan alluded to before, we do not keep these characters encased in amber for all eternity. We need to really keep them modern and fresh, and that requires risk and that requires change and that requires modernizing the mythologies. And we have a fearless writer in Brian, and that’s something that doesn’t happen very often.

Jim Lee's rendition of Superman
Jim Lee’s rendition of Superman for “Action Comics” #1000. DC Comics

We need to really keep [characters] modern and fresh, and that requires risk and that requires change and that requires modernizing the mythologies.

Jim Lee

DiDio: It goes back to what we’re celebrating — 80 years of Superman. A lot of times when you have a character for that long, you don’t change the character that much. So what we try to do is bring in fresh voices, a fresh set of eyes and new perspectives.

DiDio: We do a level of evaluation on all our books, but you have to understand our perspective as publishers. It’s not just about the DC Universe, it’s our entire publishing line. When you encapsulate our entire lines, from what we’re doing now with the introduction of the young adult line, the introduction of a mature line — if you look at the aggregate, we are really diversifying our talent pool and our perspectives on our characters. The goal is to play to everybody’s strengths and what works best and really find a way to expand out the universe with a much more ambitious publishing schedule.

Lee: To echo what Dan said. I don’t know how familiar you are with our other lines — DC Zoom, DC Ink, the Sandman Universe, even the upcoming Milestone line. There’s a lot of diversity in our ranks, and it really mirrors the audience that buys and reads our content. It’s been a real interesting past couple of years as we’ve ramped up all of these different initiatives, and now that they’re up and running, I think you can just look at the range of creators that we have. I don’t think we’ve ever had as diverse and interesting of a group of creators lined for the entire publishing slate than we do now.

DiDio: As comics, we should be the leaders in some ways for a lot of the creative choices. The interesting part about Superman is that he has this weird synergy with the other mediums. We talk about Jimmy Olsen and kryptonite coming from the radio show, and we’ve seen characters being created in other media that we’ve been able to work back through, but still, from our standpoint, we want to be at the forefront of what’s going on. It’s great to see these things happening — the launch of the “Krypton” show and the fact that “Supergirl” is on the air and other things happening — but for us, it’s about the comics. It’s a publishing moment and we want to celebrate it in that fashion.

Lee: “The Bachelor” because I enjoy celebrating young people who are on TV for the right reasons.

DiDio: Mets baseball

DC honchos
Co-publishers at DC Entertainment, Dan DiDio, left, and Jim Lee. Myung J. Chun / Los Angeles Times

jevon.phillips@latimes.com

Follow me on Twitter: @Storiz

From: http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/herocomplex/la-et-hc-sunday-conversation-superman-20180413-htmlstory.html

Sunday Conversation: DC Comics publishers talk about redefining …

Here’s the challenge for Dan DiDio and Jim Lee, the publishers of DC Comics as the company celebrates 80 years of Superman and the release of “Action Comics” #1000: What can be done to shake up the Man of Steel?

“’Action Comics’ was defined by Superman since he was on the cover of the first issue. [He’s the] first superhero character. It ultimately not just defined Superman himself, but the genre of superheroes,” says DiDio. “That’s why we love celebrating ‘Action Comics’ #1000, ’cause it wasn’t just about Superman, but really, this entire business is built on that idea.”

DC is also releasing a compilation of Superman comics highlighting some of the key storylines that defined the character. Earlier this year, it was announced that Brian Michael Bendis, a longtime influential Marvel writer who recently defected to DC Comics, would be shaping Superman’s new direction.

“Brian’s really going to put his mark on the character and redefine the mythology of the character,” said Lee. “That’s exciting ’cause it shows that even after 80 years, there are new ways to rekindle and reignite the mythology.”

We sat down with the duo, with Lee calling in from South-by-Southwest (“It’s like Comic-Con without the superheroes!”) and DiDio at the Burbank headquarters of DC Comics to talk Superman, legacy and moving forward.

[“Action Comics”] ultimately not just defined Superman himself but the genre of superheroes.

Dan Didio

'Action Comics'
The first issue of “Action Comics” and the first featuring Superman sits in the archive at DC Comics. Myung J. Chun / Los Angeles Times


Jim Lee: It’s interesting that you note that collectors and fans like the appeal of the first issue, but I’ll tell you that historically, the next most important number is 100, and historically, this is the first time that a thousand has been reached. We’re already seeing huge interest in this issue as a milestone issue and that fact that it’s the first book to hit this number. I feel like the marathon runner who just stepped across the finish line and got to work on the thousandth issue given all of the incredible stories that were created prior to it.

Dan DiDio: The reality is that we wanted to embrace the history of the character. The best part about “Action Comics” #1000 itself is that while the story that Jim and Brian Bendis are doing is leading into ultimately the new direction of Superman, there are so many different standalone stories in that [80 years of Superman] book that really capture the essence of this character. So with all the promotion and attention around #1000, I think you’re going to get this beautiful package of so many stories with all the depth and all the history of who Superman is. If you’re a brand new fan or just have casual awareness of Superman, this is the place to start.

Lee: I feel like that’s Brian’s story to tell. All I can say is that it will be startling. It will be interesting. It will be illuminating. It will usher in a new era for the character, which is what you want. We didn’t want to do a celebratory issue that didn’t mean anything. In walks Brian with this great idea, this great premise, to redefine the character and it unlocked all these other ideas.

DiDio: Let me spoil it a little bit. Brian’s stuff really does challenge the origin of Superman and calls in some new elements that reinterpret everything that’s happened to him up until this point. The piece that you’re going to see in “Action Comics” #1000 takes place after the events in “Man of Steel,” so you get kind of a preview of what’s to come. We introduce a new villain and there’s lots of story beats inside there. More important, when you have as many people buying into this, it becomes a great launchpad for everything that Brian wants to do as well as to get a sense of the scope of the DC Universe.

DiDio: It’s the accessibility and relatability of the character that creates our constant need to really contemporize him and move the stories forward. With so much other media with our characters these days, it’s essential for us to stay as innovative as possible. So we always feel like we have to be in front of them in our storytelling — reviewing them and finding ways to freshen them up. I think Superman is the perfect example. You’ve seen so many iterations, but he’s always true to what he is, though he’s still built on today’s ideas.

Lee: We’re longtime fans of his work at Marvel and really jealous that they had such a prolific writer [who] was driving so much of their narrative, their mythology and their universe. So, we knew he’s a creator with big ideas. That’s what you want on your biggest character and your biggest issue. He just came in with a passion that you see was a trademark for the work he did at Marvel. He’s not a guy [who’s] scared of exploring, experimenting and really burrowing down into what makes characters tick. As Dan alluded to before, we do not keep these characters encased in amber for all eternity. We need to really keep them modern and fresh, and that requires risk and that requires change and that requires modernizing the mythologies. And we have a fearless writer in Brian, and that’s something that doesn’t happen very often.

Jim Lee's rendition of Superman
Jim Lee’s rendition of Superman for “Action Comics” #1000. DC Comics

We need to really keep [characters] modern and fresh, and that requires risk and that requires change and that requires modernizing the mythologies.

Jim Lee

DiDio: It goes back to what we’re celebrating — 80 years of Superman. A lot of times when you have a character for that long, you don’t change the character that much. So what we try to do is bring in fresh voices, a fresh set of eyes and new perspectives.

DiDio: We do a level of evaluation on all our books, but you have to understand our perspective as publishers. It’s not just about the DC Universe, it’s our entire publishing line. When you encapsulate our entire lines, from what we’re doing now with the introduction of the young adult line, the introduction of a mature line — if you look at the aggregate, we are really diversifying our talent pool and our perspectives on our characters. The goal is to play to everybody’s strengths and what works best and really find a way to expand out the universe with a much more ambitious publishing schedule.

Lee: To echo what Dan said. I don’t know how familiar you are with our other lines — DC Zoom, DC Ink, the Sandman Universe, even the upcoming Milestone line. There’s a lot of diversity in our ranks, and it really mirrors the audience that buys and reads our content. It’s been a real interesting past couple of years as we’ve ramped up all of these different initiatives, and now that they’re up and running, I think you can just look at the range of creators that we have. I don’t think we’ve ever had as diverse and interesting of a group of creators lined for the entire publishing slate than we do now.

DiDio: As comics, we should be the leaders in some ways for a lot of the creative choices. The interesting part about Superman is that he has this weird synergy with the other mediums. We talk about Jimmy Olsen and kryptonite coming from the radio show, and we’ve seen characters being created in other media that we’ve been able to work back through, but still, from our standpoint, we want to be at the forefront of what’s going on. It’s great to see these things happening — the launch of the “Krypton” show and the fact that “Supergirl” is on the air and other things happening — but for us, it’s about the comics. It’s a publishing moment and we want to celebrate it in that fashion.

Lee: “The Bachelor” because I enjoy celebrating young people who are on TV for the right reasons.

DiDio: Mets baseball

DC honchos
Co-publishers of DC Comics, Dan DiDio, left, and Jim Lee. Myung J. Chun / Los Angeles Times

jevon.phillips@latimes.com

Follow me on Twitter: @Storiz

From: http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/herocomplex/la-et-hc-sunday-conversation-superman-20180413-htmlstory.html

Action Comics: 80 Years of Superman Deluxe Edition Review



DC Comics has a lot to be proud of and one we can all appreciate this month is Action Comics reaching the historic 1,000th issue. To celebrate, DC Comics has released a 384-page book celebrating the 80 years it took to reach this milestone. This book features 19 stories (one of which a long lost tale never published) and multiple opportunities for those well aware of Superman’s importance to chime in with thoughts and essays on the series.

So what’s it about?

The official summary reads:

Superman and DC celebrate the anniversary of an American cultural touchstone moment with this original graphic novel anthology ACTION COMICS #1,000: 80 YEARS OF SUPERMAN, which features a previously unpublished Golden Age Superman epic! The official companion book for the ACTION COMICS #1,000 comic book.

Why does this matter?

This book doesn’t just honor Superman (though the majority does), but it also honors early Action Comics characters like Zatara Master Magician and the Vigilante. It’s easy to forget this series wasn’t only about Superman in its early days — it was very much in the variety style of comic storytelling of the time. This series very much inspired the industry and it’s why it deserves such a lengthy book celebrating it.

Fine, you have my attention. What’s good about it?


In the first issue of ‘Action Comics’ Superman jumps more than flies.

As a whole, this book is a great way to celebrate Superman and the beginnings of Action Comics. Paul Levitz delivers the introduction, which gives a broad stroke of the importance of this series and setting up Laura Siegel Larson’s foreword which follows it. Levitz gives readers a nice historical view of the series and he even writes a new tale that wraps the book up (with art by Neal Adams). Jules Feiffer, Tom DeHaven, Marv Wolfman, Larry Tye, and Gene Luen Yang all chime in with their thoughts, helping to flesh out the greater meaning behind Superman and the series itself. These essays are spread out between important single issues of Action Comics. The book can’t reprint, of course, but it gives a nice taste of how the character has evolved over the decades and different writers and artists have breathed new life into the character. You get the impression this character is timeless after reading this book, and it makes a strong argument that the series will never fold, nor should it.

Collected here are 19 single issue stories highlighting different moments in Superman’s history, starting with #1 and moving through history with Action Comics #2, as well as #42, #64, #241, #242, #252, #285, #309, #419, #484, #554, #584 (by John Byrne), #655, #662, #800, #0 (Grant Morrison’s “New 52” issue) and wrapping up with a brand new story by Paul Levitz and Neal Adams titled “The Game.” Included in this batch of stories is an unpublished issue by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster titled “Too Many Heroes” which exists thanks to the help of Marv Wolfman (who delivers a generous essay on Superman and his preserving this story).

I suspect this book may win an Eisner as it has a historical feel that brings your attention to the importance of the series. It feels thorough even though it’s not delivering every issue and allows new readers to jump in and revel in the history of the character, coming away a little more informed for it. As you read these stories you’ll note the art gets more detailed, the stories more mature, and yet the spirit of Superman never wavers. His ability to inspire hope is never lost and it’s one of the reasons why he hasn’t changed that much, yet remains a beloved character.


Some of Superman’s weirder stories can be the most entertaining.

It can’t be perfect can it?



If you were an alien race and came upon this book it’d be a good way to understand the character, but if you wanted a fulfilling taste of a story arc you’d probably feel a bit short-changed. It’s nice to see such historic issues reprinted here, but it’s not going to deliver the type of comic reading experience one might expect.

Is It Good?

This is a good collection as it shines a light on why this series has existed for so long but also how it’s changed. The essays by the multiple voices give different perspectives, from the daughter of Jerry Siegel to a professor of journalism. This work also offers two new stories, a long-lost Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster story, and another one from Paul Levitz and Neal Adams. I suspect this combined with the 1,000th issue would be a fine way to honor the character and gain a sense of what makes it so iconic. You’re guaranteed to gain a better sense of comic history by reading this book.

From: http://www.adventuresinpoortaste.com/2018/04/11/action-comics-80-years-of-superman-deluxe-edition-review/

DC Comics Celebrates Superman’s 80th Year & Action 1000

At a special panel at Wondercon Jim Lee, Dan Jurgens, and Marv Wolfman shared stories of their experiences with Superman and hints on some of the stories that will be in the special issues.

Here is a look at some of the creative talent involved

FEATURING ALL-NEW ART AND STORIES BY:

  • BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS
  • JOHN CASSADAY
  • OLIVIER COIPEL
  • PAUL DINI
  • JOSE LUIS GARCIA-LOPEZ
  • PATRICK GLEASON
  • BUTCH GUICE
  • GEOFF JOHNS
  • DAN JURGENS
  • TOM KING
  • JIM LEE
  • CLAY MANN
  • BRAD MELTZER
  • JERRY ORDWAY
  • TIM SALE
  • LOUISE SIMONSON
  • SCOTT SNYDER
  • CURT SWAN
  • PETER J. TOMASI
  • MARV WOLFMAN

…AND MORE!

Action 1000 will be the first work Brian Michael Bendis has published by DC.

Lee opened the panel with a discussion on an integral part of Superman’s costume over the years: The Red Trunks. Lee said he was never “antitrunks” but instead was exploring new looks on a traditional character. He also commented that for every fan that loves the traditional look there are plenty that don’t and fans on both sides of the issue often tell him about it online. This anniversary seemed a perfect opportunity to return to the original design and Lee is prepared for mixed emotions on their return.

Search the hashtag #thetrunksareback online to see some great pictures of the unique giveaway fans were given at the Wondercon panel.

Lee also talked about this also being the anniversary of Lois Lane. Though the character has gone through many changes throughout the years Lee commented in many ways Lois is an inspiration to Clark in the sense that she rushes into danger for social justice issues without powers.

Dan Jurgens and Marv Wolfman talked about their early love of Superman and their journey to becoming creators at DC.

Wolfman shared that when taking the tour of the DC offices as a child he would often get the chance to get pages of original comic art that was on the way to be destroyed. While the audience gasped at this, the panelist’s reminded them that these were the days before original art was returned to creators and many of them had no desire to keep them.

Because of his collection, Wolfman was able to share an unpublished story by Schuster and Siegel for the special.

Several pages of art by Curt Swan one of the notable artists on Superman during the Silver Age with Comics.

No script was attached with the art so Dan Jurgens has taken on the challenge of creating a Superman story around the art. With the stellar creative lineup and a series of variant covers celebrating all the different artistic styles over the years Action 1000 is shaping up to be a spectacular celebration. Make sure you pick up one at your local shop.

From: https://www.blackgirlnerds.com/dc-comics-celebrates-supermans-80th-year-action-1000/

C2E2 2018: DC Celebrates Action Comics #1000 Panel Report – CBR

DC is on the verge of a major comic book milestone with April 18’s Action Comics #1000, which will feature an all-star lineup of creators, including superstar writer Brian Michael Bendis’ high-profile Superman debut (before taking over both Action Comics and Superman as the ongoing series writer).

Bendis, Tom King, Pat Gleason, Jill Thompson, Philip Tan and Clay Mann are talked Action Comic #1000, and the past, present and future of the Man of Steel, at C2E2 in Chicago midday Saturday, at the “DC Celebrates Action Comics #1000” panel.

RELATED: Superman Legends Simonson Ordway Return for Action Comics #1000

Panel moderator Mike Avila stared the session by recapping the contents both Action Comics #1000 and the Action Comics #1000: 80 Years of Superman hardcover. Bendis pointed out that the contribution in Action Comics #1000 featuring art by the late, legendary artist Curt Swan came about from making a story from unpublished Swan art that Marv Wolfman had in his personal possession.

Bendis thanked the fans for the warm welcome he’s received with his arrival at DC and Superman. He also shared that the new villain that will be introduced at the start of his Superman run was inspired by one of the doctors that treated him while he was sick last fall.

“I’m going to name one of the Superman villains after you,” Bendis told her. “She went , ‘Uh-huh,’ and she walked out. She walked back in, clearly having Googled me, and said, ‘I’m really excited to be in Superman!’ She though I was nuts.” The doctor was disappointed by the design of the character, as she was hoping to be a Marc Silvestri-esque drawing in a metal bikini.

Jim Lee illustrated Bendis’ Action Comics #1000 story, and Bendis opened up to the crowd about collaborating with him. “I wrote as big as I could,” Bendis said. “It was very, very cool.” Bendis said that his script for Lee was filled with “Jim Lee tricks” he learned from reading the artist’s work over the years.

DC Nation #0 is out on May 2, with a 10-page Man of Steel preview story by Bendis and José Luis García-López. Bendis called García-López a “bucket list” artist, and never thought he’d get the chance since he was at Marvel for so many years. “He’s the nicest person in the world,” Bendis said. “It’s so nice when you love someone’s work so much and they end up being absolutely awesome. It was made very clear he’s coming out of retirement for this.” Bendis said García-López told him, “Nothing makes me happier than a writer who has a story to tell, and wants me to tell it.”

Speaking of the weekly schedule of the six-issue Man of Steel story, Bendis said his recent major health issues caused him to realize he should tell these stories sooner rather than later. “I’m 90 percent sure I’m still in the hospital, and I’m Jacob’s Ladder-ing all of this,” he said. “Oh yeah, I’m skinny now, and I’m writing Superman, and working with Jim Lee and José Luis García-López.”

Gleason talked working with Bendis on Action Comics when it picks up in July with issue #1001. “It is really exciting to be going from Superman to jumping over to Action Comics with Brian,” Gleason said. “It’s really a dream come true. And we’re just getting started. I’m really excited about what we’ve been talking about.”

Peter J. Tomasi and Gleason collaborated for an era-spanning story in Action Comics #1000. “This is Pete’s love story to Superman, for all the eras,” Gleason said. “It was really fun to dive into the history for this.”

RELATED: DC Releases King Mann’s Full Action Comics #1000 Story

King and Mann talked their Action Comics #1000 story, which was released online last month. “I am unfortunately on the record of saying Batman’s the best and Superman sucks,” King said. “I regret it, I apologize. I didn’t have any Superman stories, because I thought they had all been told, he’s just a generic guy. Then I started writing him, and he’s not — he’s much more interesting than I thought he would be.”

Thompson’s Action Comics #1000 story is mostly focused on Lex Luthor, with Superman roasting him at a dinner. Thompson said that professional wrestler Alex Chamberlain posed for her for her Superman model.

The panel gave their take for definitive Superman artist: Thompson: Steve Rude. Tan: Alex Ross. Mann: García-López, also naming Jim Lee and John Byrne. King: Curt Swan. Gleason said he grew up watching Superman cartoons more than reading Superman comics, and named Dan Jurgens. Bendis cited a specific Brian Bolland drawing of Superman from Superman #400. “I think about it all the time. I think, ‘That’s the Superman we’re doing.’” Bendis added, “I go back and look at it now through modern eyes and I think, ‘Oh, he’s so British.’”

Tan, who drew Superman for the C2E2 program cover, said he used to feel hesitation drawing the character. Avila said drawing the S must be the hardest part. “I hate that S, it’s so hard to draw,” Thompson said. “It never looks right. I like to draw the retro ones.”

Gleason addressed the end of his and Tomasi’s Superman run. “Honestly, I didn’t think we’d last more than a year,” Gleason said. “The book comes out two times a month. We basically did a condensed four-year run in two years.” Their Superman Special is out on May 9, and helps put a cap on their time on the series, along with Superman #45.

Bendis talked about the daunting prospect of taking on Superman after the current runs end, since it’s easier for a creator to take over a book when it’s in a rougher place. “I’m breaking my own rule — both Superman books are really good right now. Not only what I not reboot a damn thing, trying to build on that is the bigger challenge and the fun.”

Bendis told a story about meeting George Perez when he was young, and getting invaluable advice from the artist that helped him push past his focus issue: “‘Focus. This is what you’re here for. If you’re really supposed to do this, nothing should distract you.’ I think about it every day.”

Pushing back on the idea that Superman isn’t relatable, Bendis said the character is actually “insanely relatable.” “I look at it even as a father,” Bendis said. “I’m the father of four children, and they need me to be the best version of myself every day. That’s his job. I can relate to that on my level. Also, there’s a lot of adoption in my family. I see that struggle for identity that goes on every day, and how no matter how much Superman accomplishes it, it’ll still be there.”

“I also love that he comes from far away, but his moral values are from the heartland of this country,” Bendis continued. “It’s so instilled in him he doesn’t even know it. I’ll prove his relatability!”

Speaking of bringing the red trunks back to Superman’s costume, Bendis said, “My whole day as a 50-year-old man, now I go online, and adult people yell at me about underpants, all day long. Non-ironically. ‘Go to hell, you and your red trunks.’”

(CBR’s coverage of this panel via Syfy Wire‘s livestream.)

Keep reading CBR for the latest from C2E2!

From: https://www.cbr.com/c2e2-2018-action-comics-1000-panel/

WATCH C2E2: Action Comics #1000 panel celebrates 80 years of Superman

In 1938, Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster introduced the world to Superman in the pages of Action Comics #1. Next week, Action Comics #1000 will mark a milestone and kickoff the 80th anniversary of the Man of Steel. The party got started early at C2E2 as SYFY WIRE’s Mike Avila moderated the Action Comics #1000 panel.

Joining Mike were incoming Superman and Action Comics writer Brian Michael Bendis and artists Jill Thompson, Philip Tan, Pat Gleason, and Clay Mann

DC is actually double dipping this month with the Action Comics: #1,000: 80 Years of Superman hardcover, which includes contributions from classic and modern creators. Bendis was quick to point out that Marv Wolfman had given DC the pages from a lost story by artist Curt Swan, which will be reprinted in the hardcover alongside another unpublished tale by Siegel and Shuster… which was also provided by Wolfman! It begged the question: how many more stories does Wolfman have hidden away?

For Bendis, Action Comics #1,000 will be his first work for DC since he made the leap after nearly two decades with Marvel. Bendis had a major health scare last December and he jokingly turned the doctor who treated him into Superman’s next major villain. As recounted by Bendis, the female doctor wanted him to make her into a character who resembled a Marc Silvestri drawing, but she was disappointed to learn what her namesake will really look like.

There are more fun stories ahead, and you can watch the entire panel below!

From: http://www.syfy.com/syfywire/watch-c2e2-action-comics-1000-panel-celebrates-80-years-of-superman

C2E2: DC Celebrates Action Comics #1000 with Bendis, King and More

DC is on the verge of a major comic book milestone with April 18’s Action Comics #1000, which will feature an all-star lineup of creators, including superstar writer Brian Michael Bendis’ high-profile Superman debut (before taking over both Action Comics and Superman as the ongoing series writer).

Bendis, Tom King, Pat Gleason, Jill Thompson, Philip Tan and Clay Mann are talked Action Comic #1000, and the past, present and future of the Man of Steel, at C2E2 in Chicago midday Saturday, at the “DC Celebrates Action Comics #1000” panel.

RELATED: Superman Legends Simonson Ordway Return for Action Comics #1000

Panel moderator Mike Avila stared the session by recapping the contents both Action Comics #1000 and the Action Comics #1000: 80 Years of Superman hardcover. Bendis pointed out that the contribution in Action Comics #1000 featuring art by the late, legendary artist Curt Swan came about from making a story from unpublished Swan art that Marv Wolfman had in his personal possession.

Bendis thanked the fans for the warm welcome he’s received with his arrival at DC and Superman. He also shared that the new villain that will be introduced at the start of his Superman run was inspired by one of the doctors that treated him while he was sick last fall.

“I’m going to name one of the Superman villains after you,” Bendis told her. “She went , ‘Uh-huh,’ and she walked out. She walked back in, clearly having Googled me, and said, ‘I’m really excited to be in Superman!’ She though I was nuts.” The doctor was disappointed by the design of the character, as she was hoping to be a Marc Silvestri-esque drawing in a metal bikini.

Jim Lee illustrated Bendis’ Action Comics #1000 story, and Bendis opened up to the crowd about collaborating with him. “I wrote as big as I could,” Bendis said. “It was very, very cool.” Bendis said that his script for Lee was filled with “Jim Lee tricks” he learned from reading the artist’s work over the years.

DC Nation #0 is out on May 2, with a 10-page Man of Steel preview story by Bendis and José Luis García-López. Bendis called García-López a “bucket list” artist, and never thought he’d get the chance since he was at Marvel for so many years. “He’s the nicest person in the world,” Bendis said. “It’s so nice when you love someone’s work so much and they end up being absolutely awesome. It was made very clear he’s coming out of retirement for this.” Bendis said García-López told him, “Nothing makes me happier than a writer who has a story to tell, and wants me to tell it.”

Speaking of the weekly schedule of the six-issue Man of Steel story, Bendis said his recent major health issues caused him to realize he should tell these stories sooner rather than later. “I’m 90 percent sure I’m still in the hospital, and I’m Jacob’s Ladder-ing all of this,” he said. “Oh yeah, I’m skinny now, and I’m writing Superman, and working with Jim Lee and José Luis García-López.”

Gleason talked working with Bendis on Action Comics when it picks up in July with issue #1001. “It is really exciting to be going from Superman to jumping over to Action Comics with Brian,” Gleason said. “It’s really a dream come true. And we’re just getting started. I’m really excited about what we’ve been talking about.”

Peter J. Tomasi and Gleason collaborated for an era-spanning story in Action Comics #1000. “This is Pete’s love story to Superman, for all the eras,” Gleason said. “It was really fun to dive into the history for this.”

RELATED: DC Releases King Mann’s Full Action Comics #1000 Story

King and Mann talked their Action Comics #1000 story, which was released online last month. “I am unfortunately on the record of saying Batman’s the best and Superman sucks,” King said. “I regret it, I apologize. I didn’t have any Superman stories, because I thought they had all been told, he’s just a generic guy. Then I started writing him, and he’s not — he’s much more interesting than I thought he would be.”

Thompson’s Action Comics #1000 story is mostly focused on Lex Luthor, with Superman roasting him at a dinner. Thompson said that professional wrestler Alex Chamberlain posed for her for her Superman model.

The panel gave their take for definitive Superman artist: Thompson: Steve Rude. Tan: Alex Ross. Mann: García-López, also naming Jim Lee and John Byrne. King: Curt Swan. Gleason said he grew up watching Superman cartoons more than reading Superman comics, and named Dan Jurgens. Bendis cited a specific Brian Bolland drawing of Superman from Superman #400. “I think about it all the time. I think, ‘That’s the Superman we’re doing.’” Bendis added, “I go back and look at it now through modern eyes and I think, ‘Oh, he’s so British.’”

Tan, who drew Superman for the C2E2 program cover, said he used to feel hesitation drawing the character. Avila said drawing the S must be the hardest part. “I hate that S, it’s so hard to draw,” Thompson said. “It never looks right. I like to draw the retro ones.”

Gleason addressed the end of his and Tomasi’s Superman run. “Honestly, I didn’t think we’d last more than a year,” Gleason said. “The book comes out two times a month. We basically did a condensed four-year run in two years.” Their Superman Special is out on May 9, and helps put a cap on their time on the series, along with Superman #45.

Bendis talked about the daunting prospect of taking on Superman after the current runs end, since it’s easier for a creator to take over a book when it’s in a rougher place. “I’m breaking my own rule — both Superman books are really good right now. Not only what I not reboot a damn thing, trying to build on that is the bigger challenge and the fun.”

Bendis told a story about meeting George Perez when he was young, and getting invaluable advice from the artist that helped him push past his focus issue: “‘Focus. This is what you’re here for. If you’re really supposed to do this, nothing should distract you.’ I think about it every day.”

Pushing back on the idea that Superman isn’t relatable, Bendis said the character is actually “insanely relatable.” “I look at it even as a father,” Bendis said. “I’m the father of four children, and they need me to be the best version of myself every day. That’s his job. I can relate to that on my level. Also, there’s a lot of adoption in my family. I see that struggle for identity that goes on every day, and how no matter how much Superman accomplishes it, it’ll still be there.”

“I also love that he comes from far away, but his moral values are from the heartland of this country,” Bendis continued. “It’s so instilled in him he doesn’t even know it. I’ll prove his relatability!”

Speaking of bringing the red trunks back to Superman’s costume, Bendis said, “My whole day as a 50-year-old man, now I go online, and adult people yell at me about underpants, all day long. Non-ironically. ‘Go to hell, you and your red trunks.’”

(CBR’s coverage of this panel via Syfy Wire‘s livestream.)

Keep reading CBR for the latest from C2E2!

From: https://www.cbr.com/c2e2-2018-action-comics-1000-panel/

WATCH: Superman drawn by comic book artist Doc Shaner WATCH …

Comic book artist and cartoonist extraordinaire Evan “Doc” Shaner is probably best known for his classic art style which puts a modern twist on Golden Age comics and heroes such as Superman, Captain Marvel (the DC one) and pulpy hero Flash Gordon. While he’s mostly known for his work at DC Comics, Shaner has also provided some cool artwork for Marvel, Dark Horse, IDW and Dynamite.

He’s also worked on several titles ranging from Future Quest and Adventures of Superman to Ghostbusters. Next up he’s working on the second issue of Brian Michael Bendis’ Man of Steel six-issue limited series and taking on The Terrifics alongside writer Jeff Lemire and artist Ivan Reis. Shaner’s favorite character is none other than the Man of Steel himself and the artist recently sat down for SYFY WIRE’s latest edition of Artists Alley to sketch his take on Supes.

Pencil in hand, Shaner revealed the way he sees Superman mainly comes from comic book artists Curt Swan, Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez and Ross Andru but that he’s also influenced by the work of Jerry Ordway and Jon Bogdanove.

The trick to drawing the Last Son of Krypton?

“I try not to get too stuck and making him look classic,” Shaner told us. “I want to make him look modern because the Man of Steel has a modern story. I don’t want to worry too much about making him look like the character from the ’30s or the ’60s or what-have-you. This is today’s Clark Kent, today’s Superman. I would draw Superman all the time and it never quite looked right to me. And one day it hit me that his neck needs to be huge. That’s what makes him look like Superman. His neck is almost as wide as his head and when he’s in profile, his neck goes all the way back. So he’s big, he’s meant to be build big and sturdy. That’s part of what makes him look invincible so just making him look thicker seem to just key in for me for whatever reason ‘that looks like Superman.'”

Shaner also explained that his first experience with Superman was the 1950s TV show starring George Reeves and that until he was around nine or ten years old, he didn’t understand that Superman, Batman and Spider-Man were comic book characters since he first knew them as TV or movie characters.

There’s a lot more to unpack while the artist brings Superman to life on the page in our exclusive video such as Shaner sharing his fondness for Green Lantern, liking to draw Clark Kent and Superman equally, his thoughts on the Man of Steel’s trunks, and more!

Additional material by Nathalie Caron.

From: http://www.syfy.com/syfywire/watch-superman-drawn-by-comic-book-artist-doc-shaner

Superman Celebrates 80

Superman turns 80 as Action Comics hits 1000

As Superman approaches his 80th anniversary, Action Comics will reach a milestone on April 18, when DC will publish issue #1000 of the venerable title. The landmark comic will feature the work of a who’s who of comic creators from various ages of the character’s run, including a story by the legendary Curt Swan. Long-time Marvel writer and architect of their now defunct Ultimates universe, Brian Michael Bendis, who recently jumped over to DC, will take over the ongoing writing duties with issue #1001.

As even the most casual fan knows, historians consider Superman the first comic book superhero. Although there’d been costumed heroes in newspaper strips as well as pulp stories, Superman was the first created specifically for the burgeoning medium of comics.

Part of the character’s enduring legacy is that he hasn’t changed much over the course of his 80 years. There have been tweaks to his costume from time to time (the red trunks and gold belt are set to return, by the way), and even his powers on occasion, but who he is and what he stands for holds steady. Even when Superman appears in an Elseworlds setting or title, he retains his fundamental traits and personality.

Many artists and writers have taken creative liberties with DC’s other core heroes, particularly Batman and Wonder Woman, and many were significantly altered between the Golden and Silver Ages (Flash, Green Lantern etc.), rebooting and retconning them throughout eras to reflect changes in society and tastes. Superman has always been Supermanwith apologies to Quentin Tarantino, as many critics don’t agree with his thought-provoking, albeit unorthodox, analysis which dismisses the Clark Kent identity of the character.

Superman’s powers are various, but they aren’t what distinguish him. When the character chose to kill his enemy in 2013’s Man of Steel film, fans were outraged. They argued that Superman simply wouldn’t do that. Though he has the power to kill nearly all of his antagonists, he chooses not to. Superman is our idealized version of our best selves; what we strive to be. Even when DC has relaunched the character, they’ve always returned to the established central principles that define him, “Truth, justice and the American way,” despite how awkwardly hard to define that last one has been at several times throughout the last 80 years of our history.
Some might find the character boring, or bland, but it’s his steadfast quality that defines him and makes his stories unique.

Other than Grant Morrison’s All-Star Superman, arguably the greatest Man of Steel story ever told–but this was no Elseworlds, this was in continuity…

When DC brought on John Byrne in 1986 to relaunch the character and freshen him up, they first tasked Alan Moore with giving the existing version, basically a holdover from the Silver Age, his grand send-off.  Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow is an unsurpassed ode to the icon that still resonates today. By then, the character had become so over-powered that there seemed to be no credible threat he could face. Moore ran him through a gauntlet of his rogues gallery; a group which, save for arch-nemesis Lex Luthor and Brainiac, most agree pales in comparison to Batman’s (or the Flash’s, for that matter) for entertainment or dramatic value.

The premise of the story was that Superman’s greatest enemy was finally going to kill him. Moore ratcheted up the intensity and violence, escalating the mayhem until he revealed that the most dangerous villain among Superman’s foes was the one most fans had mistaken for comic relief for decades. It was a great twist, and Moore managed a feat most had failed to accomplish since the character’s earliest days—he put Superman in legitimate danger.
Moore also managed to make the hero more relatable than he’d ever been, by capturing what Superman meant to humanity, particularly those who loved him. Seeing the character through their eyes connected the reader to him on a Meta level previous writers hadn’t explored. He was no longer all-powerful, and therefore remote.

While the basic character of Superman has remained constant as the DC universe changed around him, his supporting cast and the mythology of Krypton evolved over time. Multiple film and television iterations, both live-action and animated, have proliferated, each tweaking the secondary characters and dramatic elements as necessary, to present a unique version of otherwise all too familiar stories.

Grandpa Seg-El holding Kal-El’s iconic cape. Apologies to Edna Mode

Rather than revisit existing continuity, SYFY has taken the liberating step of developing their recently debuted series Krypton, around the new character of Seg-El, Superman’s grandfather. The producers are free to explore the roots of the iconic hero, and what makes him special, without having to worry about any audience preconceptions. It’s a show that may explain how great Superman is, without ever actually featuring him. Grandson-to-be, Kal-El hovers over proceedings like a ghost from the future. He’s not the focus of the narrative—he isn’t even in it, though his famous cape is—yet it’s still about him in some ways.
But it’s a risky move.
A roguish anti-hero and, at least initially, nothing like the Kal-El we know, grandpa Seg’s victory is preordained: Clearly, he must live and triumph for Superman to eventually be born. Guaranteeing the success of the protagonist robs the plot of some dramatic tension.

However, we’ve always known Superman was going to win in the end. It’s been up to great creators to find a way to keep the stories interesting nonetheless. So here’s a toast to the first 1000 issues of Action Comics, and the next 1000 to come—may they always find a way to surprise us without ever sacrificing what makes the Man of Steel special.



Leave a Reply

Cancel reply


From: https://salutemag.com/2018/04/05/superman-celebrates-80/

Gallery

sup2 ironons_set2_10 ironons_set2_4 anniversary1 Showcase_Superman_Vol2_1024x768 Showcase_Superman_Vol2_1280x1024 CR lois sm_logo_50x50 smcov supergirl2 superman-movie

Popular Posts

Archives