A Superman Movie Villain Is Finally Being Introduced To The Comics

Superman IV: The Quest For Peace saw Lex Luthor, who was absent from Superman III, creating The Nuclear Man by taking a strand of Superman’s hair, putting inside a genetic matrix and attaching it to the side of a nuclear missile. When that missile went airborne during a test launched, Superman, insistent on ridding Earth of its nuclear weaponry, intercepted the missile and tossed it into the Sun. That triggered the creation of Nuclear Man, who was physically portrayed by Mark Pillow and voiced by Hackman. Nuclear Man gave Superman a good run for his money, but in the end, he was defeated when the Man of Steel dropped him into the core of a nuclear power plant, turning him into electrical energy. The Quest for Peace was met with poor reviews upon release and only made a little over $36 million worldwide off a $17 million budget, thus killing any plans for Superman V. It would be another 19 years until another theatrical Superman movie was released, and Superman Returns, while set in the same continuity as the Reeve series, opted to ignore the events of Superman III and The Quest for Peace.

From: https://www.cinemablend.com/news/2438530/a-superman-movie-villain-is-finally-being-introduced-to-the-comics

Bio Comic Tells The Heartbreaking Story of Superman Co-Creator Joe Shuster

Joe Shuster changed everything. When he drew that squinty man in the circus leotard lifting an automobile over his head and smashing it down onto a rocky outcropping — with the panicky gangster fleeing in disbelief toward the reader — he fired the imagination of countless children. Comic books — all of popular culture, really — could never possibly be the same again.

Shuster’s own story and tragedy are well known in the comics community, including the sale of Superman for only $130, his failing eyesight and inability to continue drawing, and his decline into anonymity and poverty before finally receiving recognition and a pension from DC Comics in the 1970s. Several insightful and valuable biographies and histories of Superman’s creators and of the comics medium as a whole have told Shuster’s story, but none has told that story in his native medium — in comic book form.

Recently released from Super Genius (a Papercutz imprint), The Joe Shuster Story: The Artist Behind Superman finally presents Shuster’s tale, as well as that of his friend and Superman co-creator Jerry Siegel, via sequential art. Two experienced comic book biographers, writer Julian Voloj (author of Ghetto Brother: Warrior to Peacemaker) and illustrator Thomas Campi (Magritte: This is Not a Biography), bring Shuster’s story to four-color life.

RELATED: Magritte Comic Book Biography Captures the Artist’s Surrealist Spirit

“The focus on Joe Shuster came more by coincidence,” Voloj admitted in an interview with CBR. “When I was exploring the idea of turning the story into a graphic novel, I learned that someone donated a box of letters, written by Joe Shuster, to Columbia University. I contacted librarian Karen Green and got access to the letters even before they were fully catalogued.

“They were heartbreaking letters, most of them from around 1965-1970 when he was struggling to pay medical bills and fearing to be evicted,” Voloj continued. “Reading about his hardship in his own words made me decide that he’d become the narrator.”

Keeping Shuster in the foreground was sometimes difficult, as the more assertive partner, Siegel, often took the lead in their creative, business and personal relationships. “Shuster was definitely the more quiet of the dynamic duo,” Voloj said. “Siegel was the more outspoken, the one who took initiative, be it negotiating with potential publishers (even before Superman) or deciding to go to court.

“The book is not only the story of Superman’s origins, but it is most of all the story of a friendship, and I think that Shuster often joined Siegel in his endeavors because of loyal friendship.”

Voloj went on about the decision to make Shuster the book’s core. “To me, Joe Shuster was the more tragic character: He was an illustrator who was losing his eyesight. He was in love with the Lois Lane model, and his friend Jerry Siegel ended up marrying her. Focusing on his perspective is a way to take him out of Jerry Siegel’s shadow; making him the narrator is giving him a voice.”

When the discussion turned to the already voluminous material about Siegel and Shuster, Voloj was quick to praise and cite many earlier histories. “Yes, that’s true and you can see that the graphic novel has nearly 20 pages of annotations, citing every great resource we used when doing the book. My interest in the American comic book history stems back to reading Michael Chabon’s fictionalized account in The Adventures of Kavalier and Clay and shortly afterwards Gerard Jones’ non-fiction book Men of Tomorrow. Then there is the amazingly researched Superboys by Brad Ricca, and not to forget the important work of Marc Tyler Nobleman and so many others. Superman created the whole industry, and to me, this was a story that had to be told in comic book form, paying homage to the artform itself.”

The comic book industry was essentially born with Action Comics #1, so in many ways, the history of Joe Shuster is the history of American comic books. After falling out with National/DC, Shuster’s search for work led him to briefly providing illustrations for Nights of Horror fetish pulps. That publisher’s legal problems coincided with the infamous Senate hearings on the connection between comics and juvenile delinquency, leaving Shuster fearful of public shame or legal repercussions.

“The book was never about Superman alone, but really a story about the American comic book history itself. Joe Shuster’s life is put into the wider historical context,” Voloj said of the book’s many historical connections. “He’s the child of Jewish immigrants, and like so many of his peers, he faced discrimination on the job market. The fact that most comic book pioneers were either of Jewish or Italian background had to do with the fact that they were barred from the advertising world. And once Superman became a success, they became the ‘Mad Men’ of comics. The Senate hearings are in this context important because they had many antisemitic undertones. They not only changed the face of the industry, but they were also a reminder that Jews were not totally accepted in post-World War II America.”

Excepting his role in several lawsuits to regain rights to or control of Superman, specific details of Shuster’s life are fleeting and anecdotal for nearly a quarter century from the early 1950s into the early or mid-’70s. While Voloj does paint a picture with the scant details known (for example, a famous instance of Shuster, working as a delivery man, presenting a package in the same building as National’s offices and being insulted by publisher Jack Liebowitz), he feels the lack of concrete information suits the tragedy of Shuster’s story.

He explained, “Losing Superman pushed both creators into obscurity, so in a way it is fitting that we don’t know much about their life. In the book’s narrative, the trial is a turning point, and we only see tidbits of Shuster’s post-Superman life. Both Siegel and Shuster did not only lose their creation, they were lost. And the industry that Superman created continued without them. Therefore the narrative focus broadens and we learn, for instance, about the readership’s changing tastes, the congressional hearings, etc. The story is told from Shuster’s perspective, so I imagined him still following developments, even if he is no longer part of it.”

Although both Siegel and Shuster have been gone for over twenty years now, more details about their lives – both personal and business – continue to be unearthed. Voloj and Campi’s book steers into the commonly told version of Jerry Siegel’s father’s death, that he was murdered during a hold-up, even though that story has recently been debunked.

Voloj explained, “Marc Tyler Nobleman proved that he was not shot, but rather died of a heart attack. In the illustrations, however, we play with the fact that it was for a long time unclear how he died. We see the robbery, but don’t know what exactly happened. For many years, Superman’s bulletproofness was related to the idea that Siegel’s father was shot, so leaving it open in the illustrations allows readers to come to this conclusion. However, the endnotes explain that he died of a heart attack.”

Another more recent revelation that made it into the book was Bob Kane’s role in Siegel and Shuster’s first lawsuit against DC/National — namely, that Kane was asked to join the suit, but instead informed the company of the impending legal action to get better terms for himself with Batman’s ownership. “It is worth reading the endnotes to this scene,” Voloj said. “Nobleman actually uncovered the backstory related to Kane’s decision to inform the publishers. His father advised him not to join the lawsuit, and from his perspective, it was the right decision since he became the only winner of the lawsuit – by not being involved and renegotiating his contract.”

When the discussion turned to Superman’s impact, both Voloj and Campi believe Shuster and Siegel deserve all the credit for Superman’s success. “Superman was a game changer,” said Voloj. “As one can see in our book, Siegel and Shuster were influenced by contemporary pop culture and mixed different elements into a something new. It’s science fiction — not from a distant future, but rather in the present. It’s not set on an exotic planet, but right here in an American city. Clark Kent has Zorro’s secret identity, but is at the same time an underdog like Harold Lloyd. All the puzzle pieces existed in the culture that surrounded these Cleveland youngsters, but they put them together into something different.”

Campi chimed in to expand on that thought and comment specifically on Shuster’s graphic appeal. “I think it’s very special. Joe Shuster was just a kid when he did the first drawings and actually graphically created Superman. Working on this book gave me the opportunity to study his work and I couldn’t help picturing this kid in the ’30s, those beautiful curvy cars, the suits with large pants, suspenders, wooden nib pens, big pieces of paper, no internet, no DVD, no smartphones; it’s all fascinating. He was making history without all the help we can have in this digital era.”

“The artwork can seem naïve if seen through the eyes of somebody working digitally or simply used to modern aesthetics. I think it’s great if you put it in context,” Campi continued. “I’ve studied and reproduced a few of his drawings for the book. The inking, and even the way he simplified anatomy, were pretty impressive for someone of his age who didn’t have the amount of comics and references we have nowadays. Personally, I’m a big fan of those old-school styles, they have that sort of elegance that never gets old.”

The Joe Shuster Story: The Artist Behind Superman is available now from Super Genius.

From: https://www.cbr.com/joe-shuster-superman-creator-biography/

Comic Legends: The Strange Case of Perry White’s Temporary Replacement

Welcome to Comic Book Legends Revealed! This is the six hundred and eighty-fourth week where we examine comic book legends and whether they are true or false.

Click here for Part 1 of this week’s legends.
Click here for Part 2.

NOTE: I noticed that the the CSBG Twitter page was nearing 10,000 followers. If we hit 10,050 followers on the the CSBG Twitter page then I’ll do a BONUS edition of Comic Book Legends Revealed during the week that we hit 10,050. So three more legends! Sounds like a great deal, right?

COMIC LEGEND:

The Superman titles replaced Perry White as the editor of the Daily Planet but then Mort Weisinger changed his mind mid-story and Perry returned.

STATUS:

True

1966 was a weird time for the Superman titles. After an extremely successful start to the decade, things were beginning to unravel a bit for the books. Longtime Superman editor, Mort Weisinger, wasn’t sure why things were going relatively poorly for the books (what he probably did not want to admit was that losing two of his main writers probably didn’t help. One of them, Edmond Hamilton, retired, but the other one, Superman co-creator Jerry Siegel, was fired for the temerity of trying to get the copyright to Superman back).

He was filled with indecision over the books. It is no surprise that he ended up retiring himself in 1970. He just didn’t know what to do.

The problem with that indecision is that it directly affected the titles that he was editing, resulting in some hilariously weird stories where he would make a big change and then instantly regret it and change it back. Years ago, I wrote about one of these changes in an old Comic Book Legends Revealed, about how Weisinger decided to remove Superboy and Supergirl from the Legion and then, mid-story, change his mind and it was only due to E. Nelson Bridwell writing a heck of a story that it did not end up reading like madness. Luckily, fans were already used to Superman/Superboy (and the Legion, too), coming up with convoluted plans, so Superboy and Supergirl “leaving forever” only to return the next issue wasn’t really all that out of the ordinary for comics of this era.

In Superman’s Girl Friend, Lois Lane #62, Lois is volunteering at a hospital when Perry White shows up…

Her new temporary editor, Clark Kent, has her cover an announcement regarding the Senate race for the state that Metropolis is in…

The miffed Lois decides to run against Superman and she obviously gets trounced in the polls until Mister Mxyzptlk shows up and begins to help her beat Superman. She realizes, in the end, that this wrong and she tricks Mxy to going back to his home dimension…

We learn, though, that Superman and Lois are both ineligible to become Senators (Superman only ran to help distract Mxy) and so a new Senator has to be named…Perry White! And so his replacement was named, Van Benson…

Showing that this was intended to be a real change, Benson shows up in the next month’s issue of Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen, where he insults Jimmy’s reporting skills..

but comes around in the end…

The new status quo also showed up in Action Comics #335.

The late, great comic book historian Rich Morrissey was the one who broke the aformentioned Legion reversal story and he, too, announced that this was also a case of Weisinger reversing himself mid-story, and I tend to believe Morrissey.

So the next issue of Lois Lane (released a month after those other comics, as it came out with 8 issues yearly at the time, so four times a year they would take a month off), suddenly sees Lois suspect Van Benson might be a secret agent for evil…

As it turned out, he WAS an FBI agent undercover pretending to be evil. So now that his assignment was over, Perry White shows up and takes his old job back, “temporarily” (but obviously permanently)…

Funny stuff. Thanks to Rich Morrissey for the information!


Check out my latest TV Legends Revealed – Did NBC prevent Star Trek from having a 50/50 Male/Female crew on the Enterprise?


OK, that’s it for this week!

Thanks to the Grand Comics Database for this week’s covers! And thanks to Brandon Hanvey for the Comic Book Legends Revealed logo, which I don’t even actually use on the CBR editions of this column, but I do use them when I collect them all on legendsrevealed.com!

Feel free (heck, I implore you!) to write in with your suggestions for future installments! My e-mail address is cronb01@aol.com. And my Twitter feed is http://twitter.com/brian_cronin, so you can ask me legends there, as well!

Here’s my brand-new book, 100 Things X-Men Fans Should Know And Do Before They Die, from Triumph Books.

If you want to order a copy, ordering it here gives me a referral fee.

Here’s my second book, Why Does Batman Carry Shark Repellent? The cover is by Kevin Hopgood (the fellow who designed War Machine’s armor).

batshark

If you want to order a copy, ordering it here gives me a referral fee.

Follow Comics Should Be Good on Twitter and on Facebook (also, feel free to share Comic Book Legends Revealed on our Facebook page!). Not only will you get updates when new blog posts show up on both Twitter and Facebook, but you’ll get some original content from me, as well!

Here’s my book of Comic Book Legends (130 legends. — half of them are re-worked classic legends I’ve featured on the blog and half of them are legends never published on the blog!).

The cover is by artist Mickey Duzyj. He did a great job on it…

If you’d like to order it, you can use the following code if you’d like to send me a bit of a referral fee…

Was Superman a Spy?: And Other Comic Book Legends Revealed

See you all next week!

From: https://www.cbr.com/superman-perry-white-replacement/

Superman’s First Appearance Sells for Over $2 Million at Auction

A copy of Action Comics #1, featuring the first appearance of Superman, just fetched over $2 million in a recent auction.

As reported by Bleeding Cool, a CGC 8.5 copy of the famous comic book sold for $2,052,000 at Comic Connect auction last week. The sale marks the third-highest price ever paid for a comic book behind the $2,161,000 a copy sold for in 2011 and $3,207,852 in 2014. Both of those issues were rated CGC 9.0 and are part of the Impossible Collection of valuable, high-grade DC Comics owned by Vero co-founder Ayman Hariri.

The sale of this latest issue wasn’t without a little bit of drama, however. The Comic Connect website experienced a glitch in the final moments of the auction that prevented people from entering bids before the auction closed. Because of the technological issues, Comic Connect decided to continue the auction the next day after receiving feedback from bidders. That re-opening of bidding led to the issue bringing in around $45,000 more than the faulty final bid.

In addition to being the third highest price ever paid for a comic book, this latest sale is also the third comic book sale to break the $2 million barrier and the seventh to break the $1 million barrier, though it is worth noting that among those seven is the previous sale of this same issue. It sold for $1.5 million back in 2010. That the price of the issue has more than doubled in under a decade is a testament to just how valuable authentic copies of Action Comics #1 really are for their place in comic book history.

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Superman was created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, who originally hoped to sell the character as a comic strip. Failing that, they complied a number of the strips together into a comic book and shopped it around to publishers, eventually landing at the publisher which would later become a household name as DC Comics.

What do you think about the impressive price this copy of Action Comics #1 brought at auction? Let us know your thoughts in comments below!

From: http://comicbook.com/dc/2018/06/18/action-comics-1-sells-for-over-2-million-dollars/

Where did Superman come from? – Bergen Record

CLOSE

Superman turns 80 this year. But where did he come from?
Wochit

Steel — as in The Man of Steel — is an alloy. It’s composed of iron, carbon and other elements.

A similar point could be made about Superman, 80 years old this June, depending on how you count. (The Action Comics No. 1 comic book where Superman made his debut was labeled “June 1938,” but the issue actually began appearing on newsstands in April.)

Superman is iconic, instantly familiar. But he was a composite: a mix of many things floating around pop culture in 1938. Those elements were well-known to every pulp book-reading, radio-listening, movie-going kid of the 1930s.

It was the way that cartoonists Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster combined them that led to the Big Bang of comic book history: the birth of the superhero.

“Our reaction was less ‘How original!’ than ‘But, of course!'” the cartoonist Jules Feiffer wrote in his landmark 1965 study, “The Great Comic Book Heroes.”

So where did Superman come from? Not from Krypton, that’s for sure. Here’s the anatomy of the Man of Steel: Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue (and red, and yellow).

 

 

More: ‘Black Panther’ is here, and so, maybe, is a new day for Hollywood

More: Comic book letterer from Kearny gives superheroes their voice

More: Who was the first superhero? Glen Rock man’s book makes a case for the Phantom

The Name. “Superman” is a German name — but you knew that. “Übermensch,” coined by the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche in 1883 to denote the man of superior morality, had been translated as “Superman” as early as 1903 by George Bernard Shaw for his play “Man and Superman.” Superman was a familiar term by the 1930s — but mostly in sinister contexts (the Nazis, and the self-justifying thrill-killers Leopold and Loeb). Siegel and Shuster themselves had used the term in a 1933 pulp story, “The Reign of the Superman,” as the name of a villain. Their great breakthrough came five years later: when they realized that a Superman could be a hero.

The Place. “Metropolis” just means city. “The mother city of the colony” to use the precise Greek meaning. But the Metropolis Siegel and Shuster had in mind, without doubt, was the eye-popping city of the future that Fritz Lang created for his classic 1927 sci-fi film “Metropolis.” A super-city, for a super man.

The Secret Identity. Every kid in the 1930s knew that the Scarlet Pimpernel, the dashing hero of the 1905 book and 1934 film who rescued victims of the French Revolution, was really Sir Percy Blakeney, a milquetoast whose only seeming talent was writing rhymes like, “Is he in heaven? Is he in hell? That damned elusive Pimpernel!”  Zorro (1919), the Shadow (1930) and the Green Hornet (1936) were other pre-Superman heroes with diffident alter-egos. The difference with Superman, as Feiffer pointed out, is that mild-mannered Clark Kent is the fictional character. Superman disguises himself as Clark Kent, not the other way around.

The Glasses. Eyeglasses, as every school bully knows, are the mark of a wimp. As in, “You wouldn’t hit a guy with glasses, wouldja?” But Clark Kent didn’t start the fashion. Long before, the silent movie comedian Harold Lloyd played a weakling in thick glasses who usually ended up — by the film’s climax — performing some superhuman feat, such as climbing the outside of a skyscraper, or winning a war single-handedly. Who does that remind you of?

The Costume. So why do superheroes wear tights and a cape? Superman’s costume probably goes back to circus performers: the acrobats, strong men, trapeze artists and human cannonballs who were the superheroes of the pre-comic book world. That look was first adopted by Alex Raymond for his futuristic hero Flash Gordon in 1934, and then by Lee Falk for the Phantom, a comic-strip hero (non-super) in 1936. The following year, it appeared on Superman — and then on every other super-person. “If Alex Raymond was the Dior for Superman, Joe Shuster set the fashion from then on,” Feiffer wrote. “Everybody else’s super-costumes were copies from his shop.”

The Powers. Superman’s amazing abilities set him apart from any previous pop hero. But even here, there was precedent. The Shadow, who had the ability to “cloud men’s minds,” had appeared in print in 1930 and on radio in 1931. The pulp hero Doc Savage, “the man of bronze” (1933) was not literally super like the Man of Steel, but very close to it; he also had a “fortress of solitude” in the arctic. John Carter of Mars (1912) was a kind of reverse Superman — an Earthling on the red planet, given superhuman strength and the ability to leap great distances because of the planet’s reduced gravity. Superman, as a matter of fact, couldn’t originally fly, just leap. It was Max Fleischer, producer of Superman cartoons starting in 1941, who made Superman airborne as a concession to his animators.

The Mission. “So was created — SUPERMAN, champion of the oppressed, the physical marvel who had sworn to devote his existence to helping those in need!” So we read in an early issue of Action Comics. Many have pointed out the similarity between Superman and the Golem, a Jewish myth. The Golem is a clay statue brought to life by a rabbi’s magic (and thus also an ancestor of Frankenstein). But the Golem, unlike Frankenstein’s monster, is a super-strong savior, who defends the Jewish people when they’re attacked. Both of Superman’s creators were Jewish, so this may not be a coincidence. Nor is it probably by accident that Superman’s original alien name, on his home planet Krypton, is Kal-El (his father is Jor-El.)  “El” is Hebrew for God. 

Email: beckerman@northjersey.com

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From: https://www.northjersey.com/story/entertainment/2018/06/12/where-did-superman-come/590645002/

DC BLACK LABEL BATMAN: DAMNED #1, SUPERMAN: YEAR ONE, OTHER HISTORY Release Dates

DC's Black Label

Credit: DC Entertainment
Credit: DC Entertainment

DC Comics has announced release dates for the first issues of its inaugural round of Black Label titles, each of which will run for three issues.

Brian Azzarello and Lee Bermejo’s Batman: Damned #1 will release September 19, with later issues releasing bimonthly. Frank Miller and John Romita, Jr.’s Superman: Year One #1 will now arrive in November as opposed to its intially projected August release date, and continue bimonthly. Finally, The Other History of the DC Universe #1 from writer John Ridley and an unannounced art team will debut in December, following a monthly schedule thereafter. 

Previously announced but unscheduled titles include Wonder Woman Historia: The Amazons by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Phil Jimenez; Batman: Last Knight on Earth by Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo, and Wonder Woman: Diana’s Daughter by Greg Rucka and an artist to be announced.

Check out more details on the announced titles here

Additionally, DC will reprint several titles from its now defunct Elseworlds and All-Star lines under its Black Label imprint, all of which can be said to follow the same creator-driven ethos of the line.

The titles to be reprinted include Grant Morrison and Frank Quitely’s All-Star Superman, Mark Waid and Alex Ross’s Kingdom Come, Darwyn Cooke’s The New Frontier, Frank Miller and David Mazzuchelli’s Batman: Year One, and Miller, Azzarello and Andy Kubert’s Dark Knight III: The Master Race. Sean Gordon Murphy’s Batman: White Knight will also be collected under the Black Label imprint, as previously reported.

No specific release dates for these reprints were announced.

From: https://www.newsarama.com/40393-dc-black-label-batman-damned-1-superman-year-one-other-history-release-dates.html

Henry Cavill Reveals Favorite Superman Comic Book Story

The Superman of the DC Extended Universe, Henry Cavill, celebrated Superman Day by revealing his favorite, character-defining Superman comic book.

On Instagram, Cavill shared an image from “For Tomorrow,” the Superman story written by Brian Azarrello, with art by Jim Lee and Scott Williams who were. Lee was hot off of his run on Batman telling the story “Hush” with writer Jeph Loeb when this story was first publishing in 2004.

“For National Superman Day (which is today!) I wanted to post a page from what is, hands down, my favourite Superman book, Superman: For Tomorrow,” Cavill wrote. “Drawn by the inimitable Jim Lee, penned by Brian Azzarello, inked by Scott Williams and colored by Alex Sinclair. Absolutely fantastic work by those men and work that I am very thankful for.

“This, for me, is Superman.”

For National Superman Day (which is today!) I wanted to post a page from what is, hands down, my favourite Superman book, Superman: For Tomorrow. Drawn by the inimitable Jim Lee, penned by Brian Azzarello, inked by Scott Williams and colored by Alex Sinclair. Absolutely fantastic work by those men and work that I am very thankful for. This, for me, is Superman. #Superman #NationalSupermanDay #DCComics @JimLeeArt @BrianAzzarello @ScottWilliamsInks @SincColor

A post shared by Henry Cavill (@henrycavill) on Jun 12, 2018 at 12:28pm PDT

“For Tomorrow” begins a year after 1 million people, including Clark Kent’s wife, Lois Lane, mysteriously vanished. Superman has been investigating the occurrence and wrestling with his feelings of guilt and responsibility for now somehow stopping the incident from happening in the first place, even confessing his feelings to a priest, until the villain behind the incident reveals himself.

Cavill has played Superman in three films so far, debuting first in Man of Steel and then sharing the screen with the other members of the DC Comics Trinity in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. His Superman returned to action in Justice League last year.

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Are you a fan of Superman: For Tomorrow? Let us know what you think in the comments!

Upcoming DC Extended Universe films include Aquaman on December 21st, Wonder Woman 2 on November 1, 2019, Shazam on April 5, 2019, Cyborg in 2020, and Green Lantern Corps in 2020.

From: http://comicbook.com/dc/2018/06/13/henry-cavill-favorite-superman-story-for-tomorrow/

Where did Superman come from?

CLOSE

Superman turns 80 this year. But where did he come from?
Wochit

Steel — as in The Man of Steel — is an alloy. It’s composed of iron, carbon and other elements.

A similar point could be made about Superman, 80 years old this June, depending on how you count. (The Action Comics No. 1 comic book where Superman made his debut was labeled “June 1938,” but the issue actually began appearing on newsstands in April.)

Superman is iconic, instantly familiar. But he was a composite: a mix of many things floating around pop culture in 1938. Those elements were well-known to every pulp book-reading, radio-listening, movie-going kid of the 1930s.

It was the way that cartoonists Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster combined them that led to the Big Bang of comic book history: the birth of the superhero.

“Our reaction was less ‘How original!’ than ‘But, of course!'” the cartoonist Jules Feiffer wrote in his landmark 1965 study, “The Great Comic Book Heroes.”

So where did Superman come from? Not from Krypton, that’s for sure. Here’s the anatomy of the Man of Steel: Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue (and red, and yellow).

More: ‘Black Panther’ is here, and so, maybe, is a new day for Hollywood

More: Comic book letterer from Kearny gives superheroes their voice

More: Who was the first superhero? Glen Rock man’s book makes a case for the Phantom

The Name. “Superman” is a German name — but you knew that. “Übermensch,” coined by the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche in 1883 to denote the man of superior morality, had been translated as “Superman” as early as 1903 by George Bernard Shaw for his play “Man and Superman.” Superman was a familiar term by the 1930s — but mostly in sinister contexts (the Nazis, and the self-justifying thrill-killers Leopold and Loeb). Siegel and Shuster themselves had used the term in a 1933 pulp story, “The Reign of the Superman,” as the name of a villain. Their great breakthrough came five years later: when they realized that a Superman could be a hero.

The Place. “Metropolis” just means city. “The mother city of the colony” to use the precise Greek meaning. But the Metropolis Siegel and Shuster had in mind, without doubt, was the eye-popping city of the future that Fritz Lang created for his classic 1927 sci-fi film “Metropolis.” A super-city, for a super man.

The Secret Identity. Every kid in the 1930s knew that the Scarlet Pimpernel, the dashing hero of the 1905 book and 1934 film who rescued victims of the French Revolution, was really Sir Percy Blakeney, a milquetoast whose only seeming talent was writing rhymes like, “Is he in heaven? Is he in hell? That damned elusive Pimpernel!”  Zorro (1919), the Shadow (1930) and the Green Hornet (1936) were other pre-Superman heroes with diffident alter-egos. The difference with Superman, as Feiffer pointed out, is that mild-mannered Clark Kent is the fictional character. Superman disguises himself as Clark Kent, not the other way around.

The Glasses. Eyeglasses, as every school bully knows, are the mark of a wimp. As in, “You wouldn’t hit a guy with glasses, wouldja?” But Clark Kent didn’t start the fashion. Long before, the silent movie comedian Harold Lloyd played a weakling in thick glasses who usually ended up — by the film’s climax — performing some superhuman feat, such as climbing the outside of a skyscraper, or winning a war single-handedly. Who does that remind you of?

The Costume. So why do superheroes wear tights and a cape? Superman’s costume probably goes back to circus performers: the acrobats, strong men, trapeze artists and human cannonballs who were the superheroes of the pre-comic book world. That look was first adopted by Alex Raymond for his futuristic hero Flash Gordon in 1934, and then by Lee Falk for the Phantom, a comic-strip hero (non-super) in 1936. The following year, it appeared on Superman — and then on every other super-person. “If Alex Raymond was the Dior for Superman, Joe Shuster set the fashion from then on,” Feiffer wrote. “Everybody else’s super-costumes were copies from his shop.”

The Powers. Superman’s amazing abilities set him apart from any previous pop hero. But even here, there was precedent. The Shadow, who had the ability to “cloud men’s minds,” had appeared in print in 1930 and on radio in 1931. The pulp hero Doc Savage, “the man of bronze” (1933) was not literally super like the Man of Steel, but very close to it; he also had a “fortress of solitude” in the arctic. John Carter of Mars (1912) was a kind of reverse Superman — an Earthling on the red planet, given superhuman strength and the ability to leap great distances because of the planet’s reduced gravity. Superman, as a matter of fact, couldn’t originally fly, just leap. It was Max Fleischer, producer of Superman cartoons starting in 1941, who made Superman airborne as a concession to his animators.

The Mission. “So was created — SUPERMAN, champion of the oppressed, the physical marvel who had sworn to devote his existence to helping those in need!” So we read in an early issue of Action Comics. Many have pointed out the similarity between Superman and the Golem, a Jewish myth. The Golem is a clay statue brought to life by a rabbi’s magic (and thus also an ancestor of Frankenstein). But the Golem, unlike Frankenstein’s monster, is a super-strong savior, who defends the Jewish people when they’re attacked. Both of Superman’s creators were Jewish, so this may not be a coincidence. Nor is it probably by accident that Superman’s original alien name, on his home planet Krypton, is Kal-El (his father is Jor-El.)  “El” is Hebrew for God. 

Email: beckerman@northjersey.com

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From: https://www.northjersey.com/story/entertainment/2018/06/12/where-did-superman-come/590645002/

Henry Cavill Reveals His Favorite Superman Book By DC Comics

Justice Leaugue Superman Henry CavillHenry Cavill has taken to Instagram to reveal his favorite Superman story by DC Comics.

Having already appeared as Superman in three DC Extended Universe films, actor Henry Cavill has stated that he is willing to reprise the role and has plenty of stories he wants to tell with the Man of Steel. While the details on which stories Henry Cavill would like to bring to the big screen are unknown, the actor celebrated National Superman Day by revealing that Superman: For Tomorrow is his favorite DC Comics story about the Last Son of Krypton.

Cavill praised the “fantastic work” by artist Jim Lee, writer Brian Azzarello, inker Scott Williams and colorist by Alex Sinclair. You can check out his comments in the post below!

For National Superman Day (which is today!) I wanted to post a page from what is, hands down, my favourite Superman book, Superman: For Tomorrow. Drawn by the inimitable Jim Lee, penned by Brian Azzarello, inked by Scott Williams and colored by Alex Sinclair. Absolutely fantastic work by those men and work that I am very thankful for. This, for me, is Superman. #Superman #NationalSupermanDay #DCComics @JimLeeArt @BrianAzzarello @ScottWilliamsInks @SincColor

A post shared by Henry Cavill (@henrycavill) on Jun 12, 2018 at 12:28pm PDT

Henry Cavill most recently played Superman in Justice League.

Fueled by his restored faith in humanity and inspired by Superman’s selfless act, Bruce Wayne enlists the help of his newfound ally, Diana Prince, to face an even greater enemy. Together, Batman and Wonder Woman work quickly to find and recruit a team of metahumans to stand against this newly awakened threat. But despite the formation of this unprecedented league of heroes—Batman, Wonder Woman, Aquaman, Cyborg and The Flash—it may already be too late to save the planet from an assault of catastrophic proportions.

Directed by Zack Snyder, Justice League stars Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Gal Gadot, Ezra Miller, Jason Momoa, Ray Fisher, Amy Adams, Jesse Eisenberg, Amber Heard, Jeremy Irons, J.K. Simmons, Connie Nielsen, Julian Lewis Jones and Ciarán Hinds.

Justice League is now available on Digital HD, 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, Blu-ray 3D Combo Pack, and DVD.

The 10 Strongest Members Of Superman’s Family, Ranked

Superfamily-SupermanSuperman is the first and most powerful superhero in the DC Universe. Due to all of his heroic actions, Superman has earned an inspirational role in the DCU and serves as a beacon of hope for many new heroes. In addition to inspiring heroes in the present, his deeds inspired heroes thousands of years later to develop the Legion of Superheroes.

Superman can’t be everywhere all the time, so he’s lucky enough to have a Superfamily behind him to help. Even with his super strength, there’s no way he can stop every criminal simultaneously, so these other heroes all stepped up to help defend innocent people. Whether they are on the battlefield or saving innocent lives, all of these people are proud members of the Superfamily who will do whatever they have to to accomplish their goals.

Hit Next to discover the 10 strongest members of Superman’s family! 



From: https://heroichollywood.com/henry-cavill-favorite-superman-book-dc/

Man of Steel #1 isn’t just a new Superman series — it’s a new …

Welcome to #1 Comic of the Week, a series where our comics editor, Susana Polo, tips you off to a neat new story or series that kicked off in comics this week — just in time for some weekend reading.


This week marks a new era in Superman comics, making it the best time to get in on the ground floor. Man of Steel #1 isn’t just the beginning of a new miniseries, but the beginning of a new artistic team and the culmination of a lot of behind-the-scenes upheaval for Superman and the comics world.

It all started in November of 2017, when DC Comics announced that veteran Marvel Comics writer/architect Brian Michael Bendis had accepted an exclusive contract with DC. The creator of Jessica Jones and Miles Morales — the writer who’d given Spider-Man, Luke Cage, Daredevil and the Avengers themselves a new lease on life — would be picking up his pen and writing for DC Comics for essentially the first time.


Killer Moth and Firefly in Man of Steel #1, DC Comics (2018).

“You think I’m scared of this place? You think I was too scared to come to Metropolis?”
Brian Michael Bendis, Ivan Reis/DC Comics

Almost immediately afterward, the Superman “office” and DC Comics garnered attention for a very different reason: The company fired Superman group editor Eddie Berganza after the publication of a Buzzfeed report in which multiple women publicly accused the long-time DC Comics employee of sexual misconduct. Berganza’s behavior had been an open secret in the comics industry for years, and was rumored to have prevented women from working in the Superman office (which also oversees the Wonder Woman and Supergirl titles).

The Superman books had a new editor for the first time since 2012, and in February of 2018, DC announced exactly what Brian Michael Bendis would be doing at the company. He was going to take the reins on both core Superman titles, Superman and Action Comics, effectively becoming the architect of the Metropolis setting. And his tenure would kick off with a stand-alone six-issue miniseries called Man of Steel, with one issue being released weekly through May, June and July.

That first issue of Man of Steel is available right now, and it’s got everything you could want in the first issue of a new story.

Plot-wise, Man of Steel #1 leaves more questions open than it answers. Bendis’ new alien villain, Rogol Zaar, claims that Krypton wasn’t destroyed by unchecked natural forces, as we always thought, but by his own hand. But we only have his word for it. At the Daily Planet, Lois Lane is conspicuously missing — Perry White says she quit to write a book, but Clark’s behavior certainly suggests that there’s something more — and a new go-getting reporter with dark intentions has taken her place. (Well, we saw that part in May’s DC Nation #0, which you can still pick up for absolutely free.)

But don’t get worried that the issue is all about big alien threats and mysteries. Sure, Bendis and artist Ivan Reis give us the low down on Rogol Zaar’s anti-Kryptonian vendetta, but a large chunk of the issue is wisely used as a quiet character sketch. It’s just the first issue, and we already know that Bendis’ Superman is a deeply loving mind who wields the powers of a god, and his Clark Kent is a reporter who dedicates himself to finding and speaking the truth.


From Man of Steel #1, DC Comics (2018).

“I wish you could hear this…”
Brian Michael Bendis, Ivan Reis/DC Comics

“Writing Superman in today’s day and age is a such powerful experience,” Bendis told Forbes when Man of Steel was announced. “We live in a world where we’ve heard, ‘Truth, justice, and the American way’ our whole lives, right? But this is the first time those things are really not to be taken for granted. Truth has been revealed to not be as black and white as we thought it was; justice is sadly not always for everybody; and the American Dream, the American way of everybody coming here to pursue the idea that they can live a safe and healthy life — these are ideas we always took for granted, but now we don’t. No matter where you are politically, we just don’t take these things for granted anymore.

“And now I think it’s time Superman stand up and give us that hope we always want from him. It’s a great thing to be writing a character who exudes hope at a time when people really, really need it.”

So where to start in comics this week? Pick up Man of Steel #1, and follow along with #2 next week.

From: https://www.polygon.com/comics/2018/6/1/17417218/superman-man-of-steel-brian-michael-bendis-dc-comics

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