LOIS’s New Job, LEX’s APOKOLIPS Ties, More In ACTION COMICS

Action Comics #967 preview

Credit: Tyler Kirkham (DC Comics)
Credit: Clay Mann (DC Comics)

With recent “Rebirth” developments in Action Comics, one pair of Lois and Clark have pretty much replaced another. In fact, post-Crisis Lois Lane has literally taken over the career and friendships of her deceased, “New 52” counterpart.

Now that writer Dan Jurgens has established Lois back at The Daily Planet and Superman has returned to publicly fighting crime, the book is starting a brand new storyline with this week’s Action Comics #967.

Lex Luthor and Superman front and center in the storyline “Men of Steel,” following up on some of the events from “Darkseid War” and taking the book off Earth.

And according to Jurgens, who relaunched the book in June as part of DC’s “Rebirth” event, the storylines featuring Mr. Oz aren’t finished yet, as Action Comics and other DC books head toward a showdown with the mysterious character and his presumed ties with the Watchmen characters who have been messing with DC continuity.

Newsarama talked with Jurgens to find out more about Lois replacing her doppelganger, why Lex Luthor thinks he should be Superman, and what’s coming next in Action Comics.

Credit: Tyler Kirkham (DC Comics)

Newsarama: Dan, the Lois and Clark starring in your book are pretty much taking over the lives of the “New 52” versions of Lois and Clark. I feel like you’re saying that a world always needs a Superman and Lois Lane. Is that part of it?

Dan Jurgens: There’s a lot of truth to that, Vaneta.

I’ve always felt that Lois and Superman serve to define each other. Separate the two and it feels like there’s something missing.

So, yes, the world needs a Superman and Lois Lane. And the world seems to respond better when they’re together.

Nrama: Still, it feels like there’s more to this development.

Are we done getting answers about why there used to be two Supermen and Loises, but now there aren’t?

Jurgens: There’s more to this development, of course, but for now it’s really important to focus most on the Clark and Lois we have. This book is about them and where their lives are heading, along with Jon, of course.

Credit: Tyler Kirkham (DC Comics)

Nrama: Is this version of Lois Lane staying in this position long-term?

Credit: Tyler Kirkham (DC Comics)

Jurgens: Given all the things she said to Clark and the way she described The Daily Planet as something she needs in her life, it’s fair to see she’ll be at the Planet for the foreseeable future.

Nrama: This Superman’s got some competition in fulfilling the role “New 52” Superman left empty, and you’ll be concentrating on that a bit in this week’s issue. What’s going on in Lex’s mind that makes him think he’s the man for the job?

Jurgens: Lex is among the most complicated characters in the DCU. What motivates him is a bit of a mixed bag.

For one, he feels the title of “Superman” should be filled by a normal man. A human, to be specific.

On top of that, I think he responds to being recognized that way by Metropolis. I don’t think he needs the adulation but I do think he enjoys the recognition. Not just of citizens in Metropolis, but of other heroes.

For him, it’s verification of his genius. He sees himself as being worthy of the title.

Nrama: How does this week’s Action Comics #967 explore the animosity between the two characters?

Credit: Tyler Kirkham (DC Comics)

Jurgens: It’s an interesting dynamic because the differences between them are very different.

Lex sees Superman as a stranger… as something he can’t entirely explain. Lex is unsure about where Superman came from and what his background is. He has questions.

At the same time, the only Lex that Superman has known is a criminal. It’s hard for Superman to believe that this version is any different than the one he’s ever known, that he isn’t simply lying about what his true intent is. So there’s a fair amount of animosity there and that’s what makes the story interesting.

Nrama: You mentioned that Superman only knew Lex as a criminal. As you start this next story arc, does Superman suspect at all that this version of Lex might be telling the truth, that he’s a hero?

Credit: Gary Frank (DC Comics)

Jurgens: No. At that point, it’s rather inconceivable for Superman to believe that Lex is any kind of hero. That’s been his struggle since day one.

Nrama: It looks like the comic book is going off-planet. How would you describe the style and approach you’re taking to Action Comics in this arc?

Jurgens: We’ve had a couple of issues that focused more on the mystery of the other Clark Kent and then Lois. So, at this point, it’s time to amp up the “action” part of the title.

And with Superman and Lex at the center of it, we have a lot we can do.

Credit: DC Comics

Nrama: What can you tell us about Godslayer? Who is he? What’s he like?

Jurgens: We want the story to unfold in natural fashion here, but it’s safe to say that Godslayer has a very particular view of where this Lex Luthor is headed and intends to stop it from happening. It centers around some of what happened to Lex on Apokolips and that really gets us off and running.

Nrama: What kind of challenges face Lex and Superman during the Godslayer arc?

Jurgens: The biggest challenge for Lex and Superman will be their own relationship. That’s what will make dealing with the other aspect of what’s happening in the story so tough.

It’s really a question of whether or not they can get over their mutual sense of distrust to eventually work together.

Credit: DC Comics

Nrama: Will we see more of Mr. Oz soon? Anything you can tell us about where to look for more of that thread you introduced?

Jurgens: Mr. Oz?

He’s out there.

He’ll return.

Nrama: Anything else you want to tell fans about Action Comics?

Jurgens: First, that I really appreciate their support. We’ve gotten a great response to the book and that’s fantastic.

Patrick Zircher, Tyler Kirkham, Steven Segovia and Art Thibert, along with a great editorial crew have been working incredibly hard to make Action Comics the best it can be. It’s Superman, after all, and I think we have some pretty special surprises lined up!

From: http://www.newsarama.com/31908-lois-s-new-job-lex-s-apokolips-ties-more-in-action-comics.html

DC Comics’ Chinese Superman rights a wrong dating back to 1937

From: http://themoderatevoice.com/dc-comics-chinese-superman-rights-wrong-dating-back-1937/

‘Supergirl’ Reveals Cyborg Superman in ‘The Darkest Place’

The first season of Supergirl cleverly side-stepped the comic alter-ego of David Harewood’s Hank Henshaw to make the identity a cover for Martian Manhunter, but the real Cyborg Superman may arrive in a roundabout way. A new synopsis for “The Darkest Place” reveals the steely Superman’s debut, but who’s behind all the gear?

The CW released an official synopsis for its November 21 Supergirl Season 2 outing, in which Kara manages to infiltrate Cadmus to rescue a captive Mon-El. The synopsis doesn’t offer too many details on Cyborg Superman (hint: he’s not played by Tyler Hoechlin), but see for yourself:

IT’S SUPERGIRL VS. CYBORG SUPERMAN — While Guardian (Mehcad Brooks) tries to clear his name after being accused of a murder committed by another vigilante, Supergirl (Melissa Benoist) heads out on a solo mission to rescue Mon-El (Chris Wood) who has been captured by CADMUS. While fighting to free Mon-El, Supergirl comes face to face with Cyborg Superman.

Be warned of possible spoilers from here on out, but smart money places Cyborg Superman as what’s become of Kara’s adoptive father Jeremiah Danvers, as played by none other than former Superman Dean Cain. We know Jeremiah’s been a captive experiment of Cadmus for some time, while past years spent with the original Hank Henshaw puts his origin in line with the comics plenty.

Then again, comics more recently introduced another Cyborg Superman (opposite Supergirl, no less) in the Kryptonian Zor-El. The synopsis might cleverly hint that Mon-El himself has become Cyborg Superman, if Kara arrived too late to rescue him from Cadmus’ experiments.

We’ll find out for certain on November 21, but how might Supergirl realize Cyborg Superman? Check out the “Crossfire” trailer in the meantime.

From: http://screencrush.com/supergirl-cyborg-superman-darkest-place-synopsis/

‘Supergirl’ Season 2 Spoilers: Cyborg Superman Is Making His Way To The Series

So far, there is no doubt that fans have enjoyed the second season of Supergirl much more than the first, and the move to The CW was said to help it considerably. The debut of Superman was huge and the upcoming four-series mega crossover event is likely going to be even bigger. Now, there has been a reveal that something gigantic is coming. Something strong is about to arrive. The second season of Supergirl needs to prepare for the arrival of Cyborg Superman.

The worlds of the DC Extended Universe (DCEU) are becoming more vast with each passing month whether it is in the comics, the movies, or on TV. Familiar faces are crossing over. New names are showing up unexpectedly. Now, a big-time villain is heading to take on Supergirl.

Screen Rant is reporting that Supergirl is really growing its universe with all of the different characters that are being brought into it. So far, fans have come across the aforementioned Superman, The Guardian, Mon-El, and Miss Martian.

But wait, there’s more.

The Supergirl episode airing on November 21 is titled “The Darkest Place,” and the rundown for it has been released and it’s extremely intriguing. It details some information about The Guardian as well as one of the most evil villains in all of DC Comics’ history — Cyborg Superman.

Here is the official synopsis for Supergirl‘s “The Darkest Place”:

“IT’S SUPERGIRL VS. CYBORG SUPERMAN — While Guardian (Mehcad Brooks) tries to clear his name after being accused of a murder committed by another vigilante, Supergirl (Melissa Benoist) heads out on a solo mission to rescue Mon-El (Chris Wood) who has been captured by CADMUS. While fighting to free Mon-El, Supergirl comes face to face with Cyborg Superman. Glen Winter directed the episode written by Robert Rovner Paula Yoo (#207). Original airdate 11/21/2016.”

Cyborg Superman first appeared back in the ’90s as the popular and controversial “Death of Superman” story emerged in DC Comics. After Doomsday killed the actual Man of Steel, three beings made their presence known by claiming to be the real Superman come back to life.

In time, Cyborg Superman was exposed as Hank Henshaw who set out to ruin the eternal story of Superman and all that the hero had accomplished. Oh yeah, Hank Henshaw was also a cybernetic creation and one master villain with evil intentions.

[Image by The CW]

Comic Book Movie reported that many people believed David Harewood would end up becoming Cyborg Superman due to his eyes glowing red. That has turned out to be inaccurate as Harewood came forth as Martian Manhunter.

Tyler Hoechlin could come back to play the role of Cyborg Superman, but it appears as if another actor will likely be brought in. CADMUS has a lot of control over a lot of people (and beings of all kinds), and maybe Cyborg Superman will be a returning villain to cause havoc and destruction for Supergirl.

Den of Geek also made sure to point out something very interesting in the synopsis for the episode, and it’s the part that makes mention of “another vigilante.” With Cyborg Superman being name-dropped at the end, who is this with which The Guardian is having issues?

The CW has really done wonders with the second season of Supergirl despite having less of a budget than the show did with CBS. Superman’s arrival was met well and fans are loving all that has been going on with the series. Now, the arrival of Cyborg Superman is going to turn things up a number of notches and bring a whole new level of villain face-to-face with the heroine.

[Featured Image by The CW]

From: http://www.inquisitr.com/3683132/supergirl-season-2-spoilers-cyborg-superman-is-making-his-way-to-the-series/

One Of Superman’s Best Villains Is Finally Heading To Supergirl, Get The Details

Cyborg Superman was created by Dan Jurgens for the Adventures of Superman #500 comic in 1993. The character was first personified in the comics as Hank Henshaw, but this Hank was very different from the version of the character that we now know and love as the hiding-in-plain-sight Martian Manhunter. The comic version of Hank was a NASA astronaut who was exposed, along with his wife and the rest of their crew, to a solar flare that damaged their ship and everyone inside. The entire crew began to mutate, and, tragically, everyone except for Hank eventually committed suicide after returning to Earth. When Hank realizes that the solar flare was caused by Superman throwing a villain into the sun during a battle, it is, as they say, ON. He now blames Superman for the whole catastrophe (and, to be fair, it is kinda his fault), including the death of his wife, and decides to get revenge. After some scientific shenanigans involving Kryptonian tech, Hank manages to upload his consciousness into a body identical to Superman’s, albeit with some cybernetic parts. Cyborg Superman would go on to be a recurring villain for Superman, as well as Green Lantern.

From: https://www.cinemablend.com/television/1581770/one-of-supermans-best-villains-is-finally-heading-to-supergirl-get-the-details

DC’s SUPER SONS Unite For the First Time in SUPERMAN #10 …

Superman #10 preview

Credit: Patrick Gleason (DC Comics)
Credit: Patrick Gleason (DC Comics)

On the surface, there aren’t many similarities between Jonathan Kent, the son of Superman, and Damian Wayne, son of Batman. One is a wide-eyed boy who grew up on a small town farm, only recently discovering his father’s job as a superhero, while the other was trained since birth to be a deadly assassin, raised in the full knowledge of the darker side of Batman’s world.

Yet one thing the two boys share is Peter Tomasi and Patrick Gleason, the creative team on Jon’s Superman title and the former team on Damian’s Batman and Robin.

This week, Tomasi and Gleason are uniting the two boys in Superman #10, which begins a two-story arc that leads into Tomasi’s Super Sons title with artist Jorge Jimenez that kicks off in February. Tomasi co-writes Superman with Gleason, who also draws with periodic help from Jimenez and Doug Mahnke.

This week’s Superman #10 has Damian literally kidnapping Jon and bringing him to the Batcave, whiel also featuring the characters Maya and Goliath from Gleason’s run as writer/artist on Robin: Son of Batman.

And although the two boys don’t have much in common, Tomasi and Gleason plan to show that there are actually a few things they share – including a love of animals.

Newsarama talked to the duo to find out more about Superman #10, what happens when these two headstrong boys meet, and what readers can expect from the title when “Rebirth” starts to affect the wider DCU.

Credit: Patrick Gleason (DC Comics)

Newsarama: Peter and Pat, as soon as you got the chance to write Superman with a son, did you anticipate this meeting with Batman and his son?

Peter Tomasi: Yeah, the minute we knew we were doing the book together, it was like, we knew that meant Damian was definitely coming in at some point.

It wasn’t a question of “if,” it was just a question of when we would have Batman and Robin being guest stars in the book.

Nrama: Pat, you’re getting to play with some of the characters you introduced in Robin: Son of Batman – particularly Maya and Goliath, who really emerged as a fan favorite. How did it feel to get back to these characters, and what was it like returning to them in this type of story?

Credit: Patrick Gleason (DC Comics)

Patrick Gleason: It was great. When I was writing and drawing Robin: Son of Batman, I created Goliath and I created Maya.

These were characters that were very near and dear to me, and it was really hard for me to leave a lot of those threads dangling. But I’ve been really happy to see Goliath in other books.

When Pete and I were sitting down to figure out how this arc was going to play out, I thought bringing in Maya fit really perfectly.

So I feel like I’m getting to introduce her to a whole other side of the DCU that hasn’t met her yet.

But I have big plans for her. Maybe we can talk about that some other time.

Credit: Patrick Gleason (DC Comics)

But yeah, I like the idea that this is kind of a bridge from our Batman and Robin and my Robin: Son of Batman into our Superman book, and moving on into Jorge Jimenez’s first arc on Super Sons – just like the Dinosaur Island stuff we just did, this seemed to fit really, really well.

And it gave me a chance to work with these characters that mean a lot to me personally, as well as getting to work with them with me and Pete together. It felt right. We just got right back into the grove with this stuff.

And being able to additionally write on Superman has been great for me. But drawing is always fun. I love drawing these characters. I could do this all day long.

And I do, actually, now that I mention it.

Credit: Patrick Gleason (DC Comics)

Nrama: Pete, the setting for this issue is Batman’s world, which allows you to bring in not only Maya and Goliath, but even Alfred. Why did you want to bring the Superman characters to the Batcave? Was it so the reader could kind of see that world through Jon’s eyes?

Tomasi: Yeah. When Pat and I were talking about the story, we wanted to make sure we moved from the place of Jon’s familiar world in Hamilton and get to a place that’s the complete opposite, which is the deep, dark Batcave. So it’s like he’s gone from the light into the darkness.

It just made dramatic and tonal sense. It felt natural to get him into the cave and get him into Damian’s atmosphere, and to get him into the Bat-family also, and get him introduced to them.

With only two issues, we really wanted to make sure we let it breathe. But at the same time, having played with the characters so long in Batman and Robin with Pat, it was nice to be able to put them all together in as organic a way as possible.

Credit: Patrick Gleason (DC Comics)

Gleason: Plus, we had to have Jon meet Damian’s pets. That had to happen somewhere, preferably sooner than later. We had to bring in Bat Cow and Titus. So that might have been a little self-indulgent.

Tomasi: And also, we wanted to show everybody how much we do, in fact, love animals.

Gleason: Yes, we do love animals! Despite rumors!

But the scene also allows us to play with how Damian sees Jon.

Nrama: Reading the issue, what really stands out is that, they’re just two kids. I mean, they act like two kids would, but they’re doing it with Superman and Batman standing there. And the two men are comparing notes on being dads just like two dads would.

Credit: DC Comics

Gleason: Yep, the boys are just boys. I mean, they’re a special breed of boys, because they could easily kill each other if they lost their temper.

But there’s also that underlying idea that they understand each other. And the loneliness they have being these children of superheroes – they may start to see that they’re not alone. Even though their parents are forcing them together, there might be something they can get from each other.

And that applies to the parents too. Batman and Superman now have this common element in their lives, in this early stage of their relationship – between this Superman and Batman.

It all fits really well. Having Jon and Damian be frenemies – I think people will enjoy seeing the fireworks that come out of that.

Credit: DC Comics

Nrama: How does this lead toward what’s coming next in the book? And I assume it also leads toward Super Sons?

Tomasi: Yeah, I think you can look at Superman #10 and #11 as a prologue to Super Sons. The story is kind of lighting the fuse and showing that, obviously, it’s going to be a really long fuse. In Super Sons, we can’t be showing these two kids suddenly wrapping their arms around each other, like “Yee-ha, we’re best buddies forever.”

It’s going to be constant oneupmanship. They’ve got such different points of view and perspectives – not only from, obviously, their DNA, but even where they’re growing up and their surroundings. Everything that makes them tick is all very different.

So it’s going to be a constant battle between personalities, and disagreements on the way to do things. They’re each their father’s son, so to speak, so they’re coming at everything differently. And that’s going to cause a lot of dramatic tension between the two.

It’s going to be a lot of fun, as we show in #10 and #11, and then moving on to February in Super Sons. There’s a lot of kinetic energy and a lot of atoms smashing against atoms. They’re not going to be happy-go-lucky together, that’s for sure.

Credit: Patrick Gleason (DC Comics)

Issues #10 and #11 show you in a very clean and succinct way just what the differences between these characters are. And we explore it in Super Sons too. In a cool little sequence – people coming on board, if they are, for the first time on Super Sons, it was really important for me, really clearly and quickly, to show just what makes each of these characters tick and how different they are.

It’s important in a book like that. It just wouldn’t be as interesting if they’re both on the same page. They’ve got to be coming at everything from different angles, and that’s what makes it more interesting. And a lot more fun.

There’s a lot of fun in Superman #10 and #11 that Pat and I put in there, and Super Sons is the same way. This book cannot be immersed in a dark place. It really needs to have a lot of light and levity and really character-based humor. It makes it a lot more of a fun read and really shows these characters in a fun and dramatic light.

Nrama: That said, the stuff going on with “Rebirth” is looming on the horizon. Will these books with their levity and fun with the kids – with boys featured in both Super Sons and Superman – will these two books be affected by “Rebirth” in the coming months?

Credit: Patrick Gleason (DC Comics)

Tomasi: Yeah, I mean, there’s no getting around that. Right now, everybody has to feel that there’s change coming, which is always good in a periodical and a comic book. But especially these coming out so frequently – like Pat and I have with Doug Mahnke, it’s two times a month. So you’ve got to make sure that there’s shake-up and change and evolving moments and beats coming up.

Pat and I have been obviously plugged into the rest of the DCU on what’s going on and what’s coming up, to make sure our book is going to reflect that.

Gleason: That’s not to say we’ll lose the adventure and fun side of stuff in Superman. That’s one of the things that the twice-a-month format has really afforded us. We’re doing these three mini-arcs in a row, starting with “Dinosaur Island” and then the “In the Name of the Father” stuff we’re doing now, and then moving on to Frankenstein. We’re really looking at this as little bite-size arcs that let us explore that fun and excitement and adventure – it’s the side of Superman that people have really been asking for.

We’re making that a part of the book, so then we’re ready to move into the bigger DC-wide stuff that’s coming down the hatch. We can’t talk about what that means for the book overall, obviously, but it’s been really great to be able to do these fun arcs before the bigger stuff hits down the road.

From: http://www.newsarama.com/31811-dc-s-super-sons-unite.html

The World’s Finest Families Get Closer In ‘Superman’ #10

Superman #10, DC Comics

 

One of the weirder quirks of DC’s Rebirth era is that Superman and Batman are both fathers. I mean, if you really want to get technical, the weird thing is that Superman is a father because he’s pre-Flashpoint Superman who somehow managed to escape getting rebooted by hiding in one of the Bottle Cities from Convergence and then wound up secretly living in the DC Universe alongside his younger doppelgänger for the entirety of the New 52, but, you know, let’s not complicate things any more than we need to.

Point being, with Jon Kent and Damian Wayne both running around the universe, it was only a matter of time before the World’s Finest Dads got together to spend some quality time with their kids, and in next week’s Superman #10, it’s finally happening as Peter J. Tomasi, Patrick Gleason, and Mick Gray kick off “In The Name of the Father.” I just don’t think anyone expected it to involve a psychedelic moose. Check out an exclusive preview below!

 

Superman #10, DC Comics

Superman #10, DC Comics

Superman #10, DC Comics

Superman #10, DC Comics

Superman #10, DC Comics

Superman #10, DC Comics

 

Here’s the full solicitation:

SUPERMAN #10

Written by PETER J. TOMASI and PATRICK GLEASON — Art and cover by PATRICK GLEASON and MICK GRAY — Variant cover by KENNETH ROCAFORT

“IN THE NAME OF THE FATHER” part one! For the first time, the Man of Tomorrow and the Boy of Steel team up with the Caped Crusader and the Boy Wonder in a father-son adventure you won’t want to miss! Damian Wayne has been hearing a lot about this mysterious new Superboy, and now’s his chance to find out who he is…

On sale NOVEMBER 2 • 32 pg, FC, $2.99 US • RATED T

 

Next: The Best Batman/Superman Team-Up Comics

From: http://comicsalliance.com/superman-10-exclusive-preview/

DC Comics’ Chinese Superman rights a wrong dating back to 1937

You think you know Superman, right? I mean, anyone can name his traits.

Listen to the Story.

Here are three descriptions from people in our newsroom:

1. Strong but silent.
2. He’s a good man.
3. Superman is always like, “I am good and I am noble.”

But actually, Superman was a jerk.

Yep.

That’s how he started anyway, back in the 1930s. I didn’t know this. Not until DC Comics writer Gene Luen Yang told me.

“He’s actually kind of a bully. He’s not the moral paragon that he is today. He’s kind of condescending to the people around him. He likes to make fun of people for not being able to find out his secret identity,” says Yang. “He’s really brutal to his enemies. He’s not afraid of killing. And it took him a long time to become the Clark Kent we’re all familiar with.”

Even in recent decades, Superman has changed a lot. In the ’80s, he was a government lackey. And the ’90s? Pure sitcom cheese. He had a moody period next. And of late, he’s back to his golden-boy self.

But now there’s an even bigger change. It’s an entire reinvention and addition to the ongoing narrative. DC has created New Superman. And he’s Chinese.

The New Super-Man is a Chinese teenager named Kenan Kong.

The New Super-Man is a Chinese teenager named Kenan Kong.


Credit:

Warner Bros. Entertainment

“So, he’s a 17-year-old kid. His name is Kenan Kong. He’s growing up in Shanghai. He inherits some of Superman’s powers/some of Clark Kent’s powers,” Yang says. “And he becomes the New Superman. The superman of China.”

Scientists pump the powers of Superman into the body of teenager Kenan Kong.

Scientists pump the powers of Superman into the body of teenager Kenan Kong.


Credit:

Warner Bros. Entertainment

Now let’s be clear. This superman does not replace Clark Kent in the DC Universe. Kenan Kong is his own (super) man.

When DC made the announcement last summer, a lot of people were pumped. Others? Not so much. Critics called it “affirmative action for superheroes.” And some Asian Americans were like, why do we even need this? We’ve already got cool heroes of our own.

In fact, when DC Comics asked Yang if he wanted to help create this Chinese superman, he balked.

“My immediate reaction was no. I thought that was a terrible idea. I did not want anything to do with it,” he says.

But eventually, he agreed to at least consider the idea and attend some preliminary meetings at DC.

“During those meetings, this character started talking to me. And any writer knows that if a character starts to talk with you … you kind of have to do the project,” he says. “So I ended up signing on.”

Yang liked the idea of Asian American kids being able to see themselves in a new character. There haven’t been that many Asian superheroes in American comic book history.

Panel from the New Super-Man written by Gene Luen Yang.

This is a panel from the New Super-Man written by Gene Luen Yang.


Credit:

Warner Bros. Entertainment

Kenan Kong is also a great answer to a historical wrong, one that dates back to DC’s origin.

“The beginning of DC comics was ‘Detective Comics [Vol. 1]’ which came out in 1937. I don’t know if you’ve ever seen the cover of this? Have you?”

Me: Never, no. What’s it look like?

“So, the cover of DC Comics number one has the image of a character named Ching Lung, who is what we would see today as a yellow peril villain,” says Yang. “He’s a Chinese super genius bent on taking over the Western world. He was designed to play on the fears that America had of the Chinese at the time. And he is an image that essentially denigrates and dehumanizes an entire people.”

I asked DC to send me the cover image after the interview with Yang, and well, yeah — it’s bad. Take a look:

Detective Comics number one features the character, Ching Lung, a yellow peril villain.

Detective Comics number one features the character, Ching Lung, a yellow peril villain.


Credit:

Warner Bros. Entertainment

Looking at it makes you understand just how important this new character is.

“For DC Comics to take their most iconic symbol, the ‘S’ emblem, the Superman emblem, and put it on a — not a Chinese American character, a Chinese character — is a way of both apologizing for that original image, and it’s also a way of showing how far we’ve come,” Yang says.

Cover image of the quot;New Super-manquot; by DC Comics and writer Gene Luen Yang.

This is the cover image of the New Super-Man comic by DC Comics and writer Gene Luen Yang. 


Credit:

Warner Bros. Entertainment

That’s not to say we should all shun our past, including our comic books. Yang doesn’t. For there are plenty of traits the New Superman shares with the original.

This one is my favorite: Kenan Kong starts out as a jerk.

More about Gene Luen Yang’s Boxers Saints and The Shadow Hero.

From: http://www.pri.org/stories/2016-10-28/dc-comics-chinese-superman-rights-wrong-dating-back-1937

DC Comics’ Chinese Superman rights a wrong dating back to 1937 …

You think you know Superman, right? I mean, anyone can name his traits.

Here are three descriptions from people in our newsroom:

1. Strong but silent.
2. He’s a good man.
3. Superman is always like, “I am good and I am noble.”

But actually, Superman was a jerk.

Yep.

That’s how he started anyway, back in the 1930s. I didn’t know this. Not until DC Comics writer Gene Luen Yang told me.

“He’s actually kind of a bully. He’s not the moral paragon that he is today. He’s kind of condescending to the people around him. He likes to make fun of people for not being able to find out his secret identity,” says Yang. “He’s really brutal to his enemies. He’s not afraid of killing. And it took him a long time to become the Clark Kent we’re all familiar with.”

Even in recent decades, Superman has changed a lot. In the ’80s, he was a government lackey. And the ’90s? Pure sitcom cheese. He had a moody period next. And of late, he’s back to his golden-boy self.

But now there’s an even bigger change. It’s an entire reinvention and addition to the ongoing narrative. DC has created New Superman. And he’s Chinese.

The New Super-Man is a Chinese teenager named Kenan Kong.

The New Super-Man is a Chinese teenager named Kenan Kong.


Credit:

Warner Bros. Entertainment

“So, he’s a 17-year-old kid. His name is Kenan Kong. He’s growing up in Shanghai. He inherits some of Superman’s powers/some of Clark Kent’s powers,” Yang says. “And he becomes the New Superman. The superman of China.”

Scientists pump the powers of Superman into the body of teenager Kenan Kong.

Scientists pump the powers of Superman into the body of teenager Kenan Kong.


Credit:

Warner Bros. Entertainment

Now let’s be clear. This superman does not replace Clark Kent in the DC Universe. Kenan Kong is his own (super) man.

When DC made the announcement last summer, a lot of people were pumped. Others? Not so much. Critics called it “affirmative action for superheroes.” And some Asian Americans were like, why do we even need this? We’ve already got cool heroes of our own.

In fact, when DC Comics asked Yang if he wanted to help create this Chinese superman, he balked.

“My immediate reaction was no. I thought that was a terrible idea. I did not want anything to do with it,” he says.

But eventually, he agreed to at least consider the idea and attend some preliminary meetings at DC.

“During those meetings, this character started talking to me. And any writer knows that if a character starts to talk with you … you kind of have to do the project,” he says. “So I ended up signing on.”

Yang liked the idea of Asian American kids being able to see themselves in a new character. There haven’t been that many Asian superheroes in American comic book history.

Panel from the New Super-Man written by Gene Luen Yang.

This is a panel from the New Super-Man written by Gene Luen Yang.


Credit:

Warner Bros. Entertainment

Kenan Kong is also a great answer to a historical wrong, one that dates back to DC’s origin.

“The beginning of DC comics was ‘Detective Comics [Vol. 1]’ which came out in 1937. I don’t know if you’ve ever seen the cover of this? Have you?”

Me: Never, no. What’s it look like?

“So, the cover of DC Comics number one has the image of a character named Ching Lung, who is what we would see today as a yellow peril villain,” says Yang. “He’s a Chinese super genius bent on taking over the Western world. He was designed to play on the fears that America had of the Chinese at the time. And he is an image that essentially denigrates and dehumanizes an entire people.”

I asked DC to send me the cover image after the interview with Yang, and well, yeah — it’s bad. Take a look:

Detective Comics number one features the character, Ching Lung, a yellow peril villain.

Detective Comics number one features the character, Ching Lung, a yellow peril villain.


Credit:

Warner Bros. Entertainment

Looking at it makes you understand just how important this new character is.

“For DC Comics to take their most iconic symbol, the ‘S’ emblem, the Superman emblem, and put it on a — not a Chinese American character, a Chinese character — is a way of both apologizing for that original image, and it’s also a way of showing how far we’ve come,” Yang says.

Cover image of the quot;New Super-manquot; by DC Comics and writer Gene Luen Yang.

This is the cover image of the New Super-Man comic by DC Comics and writer Gene Luen Yang. 


Credit:

Warner Bros. Entertainment

That’s not to say we should all shun our past, including our comic books. Yang doesn’t. For there are plenty of traits the New Superman shares with the original.

This one is my favorite: Kenan Kong starts out as a jerk.

More about Gene Luen Yang’s Boxers Saints and The Shadow Hero.

From: http://www.pri.org/stories/2016-10-28/dc-comics-chinese-superman-rights-wrong-dating-back-1937

10 Obscure Superman Characters Every Fan Should Know

While Tyler Hoechlin’s Superman may not be coming back to the Supergirl TV show anytime soon, there are plenty of characters in the Super-mythos that the show can dip into. Here, we take a look at some of the most obscure characters from Superman’s universe, both friend, and foe, that we would like to see make a resurgence, be it on Supergirl or in the comics.

Lucy Lane

As her name implies, Lucy Lane is in fact related to the Lois Lane. The younger of the Lane sisters, Lucy classically served as a romantic interest for Superman’s best pal, Jimmy Olsen. In modern iterations of the character, she has followed in her father’s footsteps and gone into the military. Eventually enlisted by her father into a top secret project that granted her super powers, Lucy became Superwoman, on a mission involved in a conspiracy to kill Superman. All of this was part of the New Krypton crossover going on in the Supergirl series which has been collected into a trade.

Atomic Skull

While the alias of two different characters, Albert Michaels and Joseph Martin, the idea is that some sort of horrific scientific accident causes them to become super strong, emit beams of radiation, and… have a cool looking glowing skull for a head.

Kryptonite Man

The Kryptonite Man is less of a proper villain than he is a recurring pain in Superman’s side, regularly showing up in a different form or capacity every time he rears his ugly, poisonous head. Occasionally a being of pure green radiation, mostly a man infused with said radiation’s energy, the Kryptonite Man is a sure fire way to get Superman beat up. The most recent version of the character, Clay Ramsay, appeared in the New 52 Action Comics Annual #1, where his origin is told and available here.

Lori Lemaris

Lori Lemaris is one of those novel concepts that never really made her way out of the Silver Age that she was created in, which is a shame. A mermaid from the city Tritonis, a division of Atlantis, Lori first appeared way back in Superman #129 in 1959, as a college girlfriend of Clark Kent’s. Hiding her… mer-legs… mer-fin?… tail in the disguise of a wheelchair, Lori eventually had to return to Atlantis, revealing to Clark that not only was she not human, but that she knew his secret identity due to her telepathy. She has since appeared in a few modern stories, but nothing of note since a 2007 arc of Superman : Confidential.

Christopher Kent

The long lost, Phantom Zone-baby of General Zod, Christopher Kent came to earth in a rocket and was found by Lois Lane and Clark Kent. Raising the child as their own, they quickly learned of Christopher’s heritage as Zod came to Earth looking for his child. After spending some time in the Phantom Zone, Christopher emerged rapidly aged, now as a young man, and began fighting crime as the Kryptonian version of the hero Nightwing.

Mon-El

A Daxamite, which is essentially a Kryptonian that is weak to lead as opposed to kryptonite, Lar-Gand landed on Earth with amnesia and was found by a young Clark Kent. Naming him “Mon-El”, and assuming him to be his own older brother, Clark eventually accidentally exposes him to lead and sends him to the Phantom Zone to save his life. The Legion of Superheroes in the 31st century eventually retrieve and cure him, where he becomes a valued member of the team. A great introduction to the Mon-El, the Legion, and the mythology of all of them is the Final Crisis : Legion of 3 Worlds storyline from 2009, which has since been collected here.

Professor Hamilton

Professor Emil Hamilton was a longtime ally of Superman, constantly aiding him in any problem that was super-science involved. Eventually discovering that Superman’s powers were not just utilizing yellow sunlight, but absorbing it, he deemed that Superman was doing more harm than good, and became a supervillain. Going by the code name of Ruin, he began targeting Superman’s friends and family.

Conduit

Kenny Braverman was born on the same night that Clark Kent’s rocket ship landed on earth. As the rocket passed over the car that Kenny was born in, it exposed baby Kenny to radiation. Infused with Kryptonite-like radiation, Kenny was a sickly child, constantly feeling overshadowed by his classmate Clark Kent. Eventually, he realized what he was, and what he could do with his new power, and he became the villain Conduit.

Atlas

In the same story line that re-introduced Lucy Lane as Superwoman, it was revealed that General Sam Lane was responsible for many attacks on Superman. One of the most effective was Atlas, an old creation of Jack Kirby, who is a magically powered being with superb strength. Despite Superman’s weakness to magic, Atlas did not defeat him, but not until after one of the most epic fights in comic books. This story has since been made available online for purchase, which you can find here.

Kal Kent

Superman’s descendant from the 853rd century, Kal Kent is the Superman of his era. First appearing during the DC One Million event in the 1990’s, Kal has gone on to make appearances in many DC stories, even in Morrison’s own All-Star Superman series. His appearance in All-Star hints at a greater role in the history of Superman, and it has since been collected into a trade paperback, available here.

From: http://www.geek.com/comics/10-obscure-superman-characters-1676336/

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