Superman Taps Into His Inner-Batman in Action Comics #1001

WARNING: The following article contains major spoilers for Action Comics #1001 by Brian Michael Bendis, Patrick Gleason, and Alejandro Sanchez, on sale now!


When the super-sized, jam-book Action Comics #1000 was released in April, it was nothing short of a milestone in comic book history. The issue was impressive not just due to the four digit number plastered across its cover — it also heralded the arrival of Brian Michael Bendis to DC Comics’s monthly schedule. But somehow, despite this, Action Comics #1001 almost feels like a bigger deal. If issue #1000 was the summit of a mountain, then this issue marks the beginning of a new climb, which feels like something that should be celebrated as well.

This summer has involved comic readers becoming acclimated to Bendis taking up the reins on Superman. Some fans were apprehensive about how the prolific comic scribe would embrace the most iconic superhero ever created, but thus far, his tenure at DC (which has included the six-issue miniseries The Man of Steel and Superman #1) has proven that not only does Bendis understand the character on the fundamental level, he can also incorporate his own story telling devices to make the Kal-El feel new again without betraying the last eighty years of Superman comics. Action Comics #1001 is no exception.

RELATED: Action Comics Is Poised To ‘Redefine’ Superman Lois’ Relationship

In this issue, we pick up a loose plot thread from The Man of Steel surrounding a series of mysterious arsons plaguing Metropolis. The fires have been the bane of not just Superman, but Clark Kent. And yes, there is a dichotomy there, despite the two of them being the same person. Clark can interact with certain groups of people in ways Superman never could, and vice versa.

As the logline on the cover of this issue proclaims, “As Metropolis burns, only one hero can save it… Clark Kent.” This isn’t some cheeky nod to the power of investigative journalism. It’s stating a fact. Despite all his power, there are some thing Superman can’t get done on his own. The string of fires burning his city down is a something he can’t solve by punching it into orbit.

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From: https://www.cbr.com/superman-action-comics-batman-detective-work/

‘Teen Titans Go! To The Movies’ is wacky DC Comics fun – TwinCities.com

Compared to their dark and dour live-action brethren, the Warner Brothers/DC Comics animated features are a breath of fresh air. Much like “The Lego Batman Movie” (which one could argue is the best Batman movie — full stop), the wild, wacky and self-aware “Teen Titans Go! To the Movies” bursts onto the screen like an attention-addled sugar rush. It absolutely nails the humor and self-referential material that is so sorely lacking from the likes of “Batman Vs. Superman.” So yeah, it is possible to make a funny DC Comics movie.

Based on the wildly popular and long-running Cartoon Network series “Teen Titans Go!,” the feature film adaptation is directed by Aaron Horvath and Peter Rida Michail, written by Horvath and Michael Jelenic. “Teen Titans Go! To the Movies” is a deliriously demented and gleeful skewering of DC Comics characters, superhero movies and Hollywood in general that’s one long inside joke — with musical numbers!

It’s a classic story of big Hollywood dreams, wherein Robin (Scott Menville) goes on a quest to attain what seems impossible — a meeting with a big-time movie director, Jade Wilson (Kristen Bell). He wants to be a real superhero, along with his crew, the Teen Titans: Cyborg (Khary Payton), Starfire (Hynden Walch), Beast Boy (Greg Cipes) and Raven (Tara Strong). Based on anecdotal evidence, Robin deduces the way to be taken seriously as a real superhero is to have a movie made about you. And to be a real superhero and have a movie made about him, he needs an archnemesis — enter Slade (Will Arnett).

One of the great things about “Teen Titans Go! To the Movies” is the team behind the television show, including the filmmakers and voice actors, have been transplanted to the big screen and given a bigger platform, rather than replacing the creators with higher profile names. That deep knowledge and comfort with the characters shows, as it’s the rapid-fire chemistry within the group that keeps the film moving at a breakneck pace.

There are cheeky body-humor jokes and rousing musical numbers, including an absolutely epic ’80s jam called “Upbeat,” complete with a Lisa Frank-inspired aesthetic. There’s a hilarious recurring Stan Lee cameo (voiced by Lee), roasting the Marvel publisher’s thirst for screen time. Most importantly, there’s a willingness to poke fun at some of DC’s most iconic characters, like Batman, Superman and Wonder Woman. It may blow your mind that Nicolas Cage voices Superman, considering his obsession with the character and his failed Superman movie, “Superman Lives.” His son, Kal-El Cage (yes, named after Superman), even voices young Bruce Wayne. This is the kind of mind-boggling depth of reference going on.

But after such a promising start, it becomes clear that when stretched to an hour and 33 minutes, the relentless, frantic energy of the Teen Titans can be rather exhausting. The film becomes busy, loud and harried, never letting up on the pace or making room for lines or jokes to land. The Teen Titans overstay their welcome just a hair, as they most likely shine brightest in a half-hour format. But the film is incredibly smart, and funny, and a refreshingly lighthearted take on these characters and cinematic universe. Here’s hoping their attitude is infectious.

‘TEEN TITANS GO! TO THE MOVIES’

Directed by: Aaron Horvath and Peter Rida Michail

Starring: Scott Menville, Kristen Bell, Khary Payton, Hynden Walch, Greg Cipes, Tara Strong, Will Arnett, Nicolas Cage

Rated: PG for action and rude humor.

Should you go? It’s a smart, lighthearted take on DC characters. ***

From: https://www.twincities.com/2018/07/26/teen-titans-go-to-the-movies-is-wacky-dc-comics-fun/

Review – Superman: Action Comics #1001: Chaos in Metropolis …

Owner/Publisher, Editor-at-Large

Ken Denmead

Editor-in-Chief

Matt Blum

Managing Editor

Z

Senior Editors

Jonathan H. Liu, Jenny Bristol, Corrina Lawson, Patricia Vollmer

Gaming Editor

Dave Banks

Assistant Editor

John Booth

Associate Publishers*

Tim Johnides, Jeff Williams, Dante Lauretta, Magnus Dahlsröm, Jayson Peters, David Michael, Gerry Tolbert, Andrew Smith, Ray Wehrs, Joel Becker, Scott Gaeta, Beth Kee, Joey Mills, talkie_tim, Danny Marquardt, Adam Bruski, John Bain, Bill Moore, Adam Frank, Lacey Hays, Peter Morson, James Needham, Matt Fleming, Adam Anderson, Jim Reynolds, Seiler Hagan, Bryan Wade, Petrov Neutrino, Jay Shapiro

Editor (Emeritus)

Chris Anderson

Core Contributors

Darren Blankenship, Rory Bristol, Robin Brooks, Preston Burt, Mathias DeRider, Ray Goldfield, Jamie Greene, Michael Harrison, Ryan Hiller, Rob Huddleston, Will James, James Floyd Kelly, Anthony Karcz, Michael Kaufman, Mordechai Luchins, Brad Moon, Tony Nunes, Anton Olsen, Skip Owens, Jules Sherred, Mark Vorenkamp, Shaun Washington, Simon Yule

Occasional Contributors

Tim Bailey, Sara BlackburnStephen Clark, Jeffrey Cohen, Adam Dimuzio, Mathias DeRiderLogan Giannini, Travis Hanson, Sean Hallenbeck, Kim HaynesWhit HoneaMichael LeSauvage, Jim MacQuarrie, Joey Mills, Michael PistiolasRicardo Rebelo, Drew RichMariana Ruiz, Derrick SchneiderTony Sims, Randy Slavey, Andrew TerranovaGerry TolbertChris Wickersham

From: https://geekdad.com/2018/07/review-superman-action-comics-1001-chaos-in-metropolis/

The Death of Superman Movie Changes Up a Classic DC Comics Story Just Enough to Work

Superman and Lois have a tender moment in the middle of battle.
Screenshot: Warner Bros Animation

The Man of Steel still dies in the new Death of Superman animated movie. The biggest surprise in the film is how he lives his life before Doomsday takes him out.

At this point, part of the appeal of Warner Bros.’ animated adaptations of beloved DC Comics stories is watching to see what gets re-imagined. The current iteration of these films takes place in a world heavily influenced by the New 52 reboot. These adaptations graft pre-Crisis storylines onto a new continuity, which affords different angles, strengths, and weaknesses. In this version of The Death of Superman—which had a world premiere Comic-Con screening on Friday night— we get a more inexperienced Superman than the one from the classic 1992 storyline.

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This Kal-El is still a member of the Justice League but doesn’t know much about his Kryptonian heritage. He wants to tell the world about his extraterrestrial origins through articles written by Lois Lane, but also struggles with how to balance the two sides of his life. This dilemma feeds the core tension of the movie, embodied in a version of Lois and Clark are entangled in a workplace love affair. After watching Superman trounce some bad guys, Lois pushes Clark into an office closet and they start making out. “You’re always on fire after seeing him,” Clark quips. They’re trying to keep their romance secret, a decision that suits both their needs. But Lois gets ever more frustrated by how Clark keeps her at arm’s length. When a planned weekend getaway comes into conflict with his parents coming into town, Clark stammers his way through explaining why it might be a bad idea for Lois to meet Jonathan and Martha Kent. They all get together but Lois can’t understand why Clark won’t really let her into his life.

Meanwhile, conversations with teammates in the League make Clark consider doing exactly that. During a regularly scheduled meeting, Flash tells the team that he’s getting married and Superman is stunned to learn that Iris has known about the superhero side of Barry Allen’s life for years. Even Batman makes time for family, explaining that he can’t make the next meeting because it’ll be parent-teacher night at Damian’s boarding school.

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This Superman is nervous, uncertain, and even a little paranoid. He wants to do the right thing but doesn’t know how Lois, or the world at large, will accept him if they find out what he truly is. The characterization is a good beat to land on in a universe where his career is essentially just starting out.

The other plot threads running through Death of Superman concern Lex Luthor’s maniacal need to find a counter-measure to Superman through the mad-science experiments of Project Cadmus, a crew of endangered space shuttle astronauts, and S.T.A.R. Labs research on hybrid Apokaliptian technology, which is being used by the criminals of Intergang. If you’re familiar with the whole arc of the 1992-1993 comics storyline, you’ll see these subplots for what they are, setting up the latter half of a two-part film narrative.

Because the backdrop for this version of Death of Superman is different, new choices get made to communicate a sense of threat. After making Earthfall, Doomsday doesn’t tear a swath through the North American continent and maim a whole bunch of superheroes on the way. Instead, he kills Atlanteans and hapless humans on his way to Metropolis, in horror-inflected sequences that make the villain feel like Halloween’s Michael Meyers. When the hulking alien invader does face off against the Justice League, the fights are more brutal than they were in the comics, and the same is true for Superman’s showdown with Doomsday. When the two trade the final blows that end each other’s lives, I could hear audible gasps from the audience, despite the fact that most of them had to know what was coming. (Even if they haven’t read the original, it’s titled The Death of Superman, after all.)

Advertisement

In the comics, Lois had known Clark’s secret for years. Here, she knows it for, at most, a couple of days before he dies. It presents a different kind of tragedy: a love story that was just starting out gets snuffed by heroic sacrifice. When Lois gets frustrated by Clark’s maladroit romantic signals, he tells her that he cares for her but just has trouble showing it. The moments where he does show it—by telling her that he’s Superman—are the best parts of the film, mixing humor, skepticism, and heartfelt relief.

Jerry O’Connell doesn’t do enough vocally to differentiate the two voices, but does a better Clark than Superman, delivering “earnest farmboy” better than “tough, resolute superhero.” Rainn Wilson’s best Lex Luthor moments have the billionaire scientist come across as a gleeful asshole who gets really whiny when he doesn’t get what he wants. In the main, the voice performances are all serviceable.

The oddest choice in Death of Superman—written by longtime comics scribe Peter Tomasi—is how heavily it leans on Jesus allegories. In the first act, crime boss Mannheim says he wants to get done with a robbery before attracting the attention of the “man upstairs.” He’s referring to Superman, of course, but the intent of the line is to invoke the idea of a God in Heaven. Later, after Superman has died, retired sailor Bibbo Bibbowski weedily recites the Hail Mary and asks God why Superman had to die. Even more Catholic influence can be seen in the moment where Lois and Jimmy Olsen race to Superman’s tomb after hearing something happened there. The tomb is empty and, just like the Apostles on Easter Sunday, they wonder if the Man of Steel might be alive. Superman’s parallels to Jesus has been a set of ideas, analyses, and coincidences that accrued over the decades, but mostly as subtext. To have it pulled so strongly into the foreground is jarring, but not so much that it dampened any enjoyment for me.

Advertisement

The change in continuity sets up even more tantalizing deviation in the inevitable sequel. The four characters who’ll fill the void left by Superman’s passing will have ties to Darkseid and Apokalips and a dysfunctional worship of what Superman is supposed to be. Furthermore, Superman’s resurrection will likely coincide with the world learning that he’s an alien, a revelation that could replace the hope of his return with fear of a superpower outsider. However, all this change sits right next to a great callback to Superman: The Movie, reminding viewers of the whole scope of Superman’s decades-long existence.

In this way, The Death of Superman film adaptation justifies its existence, making me want to see what gets remixed now and in the future while appreciating the things that have stayed the same.

From: https://io9.gizmodo.com/the-death-of-superman-movie-changes-up-a-classic-dc-com-1827775139

Action Comics Is Poised To ‘Redefine’ Superman & Lois’ Relationship

One of the big events to happen in the Man of Steel weekly series was Superman’s father, Jor-El, taking Lois Lane and Jonathan Kent out to the far reaches of outer space. Jor-El’s reasoning was for Jonathan to experience life outside of Earth, thereby connecting more to his Kryptonian roots.

According to DC Comics’ October 2018 solicitations, Lois and Superman’s time apart will come to a head in Action Comics #1004 when the couple meets back up, with the text teasing a redefining of their relationship.

RELATED: EXCLUSIVE PREVIEW: DC’s Flagship Title Returns With Action Comics #1001

What makes things dicier is Superman’s communicator that would have allowed him to keep in contact with Lois and Jon was destroyed in his battle against Rogol Zaar, leaving the Man of Steel unable to know if his family was in danger. Now, Action Comics #1004 reveals Lois is at least okay, though she’s returned to Earth without Jon, and didn’t immediately go back to Clark Kent after her return. The solicitation also goes on to ask whether Lois still loves Clark.

Check out the solicitation text for Action Comics #1004 and its cover below.

ACTION COMICS #1004

  • written by BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS
  • art by RYAN SOOK
  • enhanced foil cover by STEVE RUDE
  • variant cover by FRANCIS MANAPUL
  • Superman confronts Lois Lane and wants answers: Where is Jon Kent? What happened during Lois’ trip into space with Jor-El? Why didn’t she contact the Man of Steel when she returned? And most importantly, does she still love him? Or is the world-famous reporter looking to let Clark Kent down easy? Lois and Clark’s relationship gets redefined in this issue illustrated by acclaimed artist Ryan Sook!
  • ON SALE 10.24.18
  • $3.99 US | 32 PAGES
  • FC | RATED T
  • This issue will ship with two covers.
  • Please see the order form for details.
  • Includes a code for a free digital download of this issue.

From: https://www.cbr.com/action-comics-redefine-superman-lois-lane-relationship/

The New Death of Superman Movie Turns Clark Kent Into Jesus

Superman and Lois have a tender moment in the middle of battle.
Screenshot: Warner Bros Animation

The Man of Steel still dies in the new Death of Superman animated movie. The biggest surprise in the film is how he lives his life before Doomsday takes him out.

At this point, part of the appeal of Warner Bros.’ animated adaptations of beloved DC Comics stories is watching to see what gets re-imagined. The current iteration of these films takes place in a world heavily influenced by the New 52 reboot. These adaptations graft pre-Crisis storylines onto a new continuity, which affords different angles, strengths, and weaknesses. In this version of The Death of Superman—which had a world premiere Comic-Con screening on Friday night— we get a more inexperienced Superman than the one from the classi 1992 storyline.

Advertisement

This Kal-El is still a member of the Justice League but doesn’t know much about his Kryptonian heritage. He wants to tell the world about his extraterrestrial origins through articles written by Lois Lane, but also struggles with how to balance the two sides of his life. This dilemma feeds the core tension of the movie, embodied in a version of Lois and Clark are entangled in a workplace love affair. After watching Superman trounce some bad guys, Lois pushes Clark into an office closet and they start making out. “You’re always on fire after seeing him,” Clark quips. They’re trying to keep their romance secret, a decision that suits both their needs. But Lois gets ever more frustrated by how Clark keeps her at arm’s length. When a planned weekend getaway comes into conflict with his parents coming into town, Clark stammers his way through explaining why it might be a bad idea for Lois to meet Jonathan and Martha Kent. They all get together but Lois can’t understand why Clark won’t really let her in to his life.

Meanwhile, conversations with teammates in the League make Clark consider doing exactly that. During a regularly scheduled meeting, Flash tells the team that he’s getting married and Superman is stunned to learn that Iris has known about the superhero side of Barry Allen’s life for years. Even Batman makes time for family, explaining that he can’t make the next meeting because it’ll be parent-teacher night at Damian’s boarding school.

Advertisement

This Superman is nervous, uncertain, and even a little paranoid. He wants to do the right thing but doesn’t know how Lois, or the world at large, will accept him if they find out what he truly is. The characterization is a good beat to land on in a universe where his career is essentially just starting out.

The other plot threads running through Death of Superman concern Lex Luthor’s maniacal need to find a counter-measure to Superman through the mad-science experiments of Project Cadmus, a crew of endangered space shuttle astronauts, and S.T.A.R. Labs research on hybrid Apokaliptian technology, which is being used by the criminals of Intergang. If you’re familiar with the whole arc of the 1992-1993 comics storyline, you’ll see these subplots for what they are, setting up the latter half of a two-part film narrative.

Because the backdrop for this version of Death of Superman is different, new choices get made to communicate a sense of threat. After making Earthfall, Doomsday doesn’t tear a swath through the North American continent and maim a whole bunch of superheroes on the way. Instead, he kills Atlanteans and hapless humans on his way to Metropolis, in horror-inflected sequences that make the villain feel like Halloween’s Michael Meyers. When the hulking alien invader does face off against the Justice League, the fights are more brutal than they were in the comics, and the same is true for Superman’s showdown with Doomsday. When the two trade the final blows that end each other’s lives, I could hear audible gasps from the audience, despite the fact that most of them had to know what was coming. (Even if they haven’t read the original, it’s titled The Death of Superman, after all.)

Advertisement

In the comics, Lois had known Clark’s secret for years. Here, she knows it for, at most, a couple of days before he dies. It presents a different kind of tragedy: a love story that was just starting out gets snuffed by heroic sacrifice. When Lois gets frustrated by Clark’s maladroit romantic signals, he tells her that he cares for her but just has trouble showing it. The moments where he does show it—by telling her that he’s Superman—are the best parts of the film, mixing humor, skepticism, and heartfelt relief.

Jerry O’Connell doesn’t do enough vocally to differentiate the two voices, but does a better Clark than Superman, delivering “earnest farmboy” better than “tough, resolute superhero.” Rainn Wilson’s best Lex Luthor moments have the billionaire scientist come across as a gleeful asshole who gets really whiny when he doesn’t get what he wants. In the main, the voice performances are all serviceable.

The oddest choice in Death of Superman—written by longtime comics scribe Peter Tomasi—is how heavily it leans on Jesus allegories. In the first act, crime boss Mannheim says he wants to get done with a robbery before attracting the attention of the “man upstairs.” He’s referring to Superman, of course, but the intent of the line is to invoke the idea of a God in Heaven. Later, after Superman has died, retired sailor Bibbo Bibbowski weedily recites the Hail Mary and asks God why Superman had to die. Even more Catholic influence can be seen in the moment where Lois and Jimmy Olsen race to Superman’s tomb after hearing something happened there. The tomb is empty and, just like the Apostles on Easter Sunday, they wonder if the Man of Steel might be alive. Superman’s parallels to Jesus has been a set of ideas, analyses, and coincidences that accrued over the decades, but mostly as subtext. To have it pulled so strongly into the foreground is jarring, but not so much that it dampened any enjoyment for me.

Advertisement

The change in continuity sets up even more tantalizing deviation in the inevitable sequel. The four characters who’ll fill the void left by Superman’s passing will have ties to Darkseid and Apokalips and a dysfunctional worship of what Superman is supposed to be. Furthermore, Superman’s resurrection will likely coincide with the world learning that he’s an alien, a revelation that could replace the hope of his return with fear of a superpower outsider. However, all this change sits right next to a great callback to Superman: The Movie, reminding viewers of the whole scope of Superman’s decades-long existence.

In this way, The Death of Superman film adaptation justifies its existence, making me want to see what gets remixed now and in the future while appreciating the things that have stayed the same.

From: https://io9.gizmodo.com/the-death-of-superman-movie-changes-up-a-classic-dc-com-1827775139

Jerry O’Connell and the Death of Superman cast cry and scream

Almost 25 years after DC’s Death of Superman rocked the comics world, DC Animation is bringing the heartbreaking story to the screen. The Death of Superman, the first of a two-part animated movie series made up of Death and Reign of the Supermen, will be the 10th film in the DC Animated Movie Universe.

In The Death of Superman, “Superman and the rest of the Justice League unite to battle a hulking monster named Doomsday — but it’s ultimately up to the Man of Steel to save the day as the two titans square off in the heart of Metropolis.”

The cast of The Death of Superman — Jerry O’Connell (Superman/Clark Kent), Rebecca Romijn (Lois Lane), and Christopher Gorham (Flash/Barry Allen) — spoke with SYFY WIRE at San Diego Comic-Con 2018 about just how much this movie is going to make us all cry. In short: Have more tissues on hand than you think you’ll need.

Watch the video below for more (and to hear O’Connell’s spot-on, in-studio grunts and fighting sounds, courtesy of the Man of Steel himself).

The Death of Superman will be available for digital purchase on July 24 and on Blu-ray on August 7.

From: http://www.syfy.com/syfywire/jerry-oconnell-and-the-death-of-superman-cast-cry-and-scream

Comic-Con Panel Packed for Holocaust Survivor, Jewish-Created …

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Ruth Goldschmiedova Sax, survivor of three Holocaust concentration camps, speaks at Comic-Con.
Ruth Goldschmiedova Sax, survivor of three Nazi concentration camps, speaks at Comic-Con. Photo by Chris Stone

Nearly 75 years ago, Ruth Goldschmiedova Sax, a Jewish teen, was forced to stand nude six times for Dr. Josef Mengele, the “Angel of Death” at Auschwitz. She prayed someone would save her.

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Thursday morning at Comic-Con, sitting quietly in a wheelchair, the 90-year-old Sax described her ordeals at three Nazi concentration camps and told what helped her family survive emotionally — hope.

Scores of people were left outside a packed Room 4 (occupancy 280) as Sax, her daughter and three others described how history’s worst supervillain may have sparked two American Jewish boys to devise the ultimate do-gooder — Superman.

Unlike other panels in that 1:30 p.m. slot — dedicated to more traditional topics such as monsters, Geek fashion and fairy tales — “Art During the Holocaust” had a darker mood.

Yet the overflow crowd at the San Diego Convention Center surprised and pleased Sax and fellow panelists.

Story continues below

As Sax shared her life story, daughter Sandra Scheller projected illustrations on how comics were used as propaganda against Jews. And also how Americans created images of superheroes crushing Adolf Hitler during World War II.

Scheller, who called her mother a “superhero without a cape,” has written a book about their experiences, “Try to Remember: Never Forget.”

During the panel, Scheller showed a female cousin’s drawing of a school. Kitty left it under her pillow. She was killed at Auschwitz.

She shared never-before-seen drawings made by American soldiers of hundreds of Jewish partisans killed in a cave.

Examples of German propaganda showed the world’s ills blamed on Jewish people.

Sax, who now lives in Chula Vista, recalled seeing drawings in the anti-Semitic German newspaper Der Stürmer.

“We were shocked and surprised by the propaganda and the way Jewish persons were portrayed,” she said. “I remember being scared, wondering: How could this be? It was something we could not run away from.”

The author-daughter also spoke of her mother’s art teacher, whose fingers were cut off. He was transferred to Auschwitz, where he was killed. Sax later used her art skills to be a clothing designer after she was liberated.

And while illustrations in German schoolbooks and posters demonized Jewish people, a counter creation appeared in the United States at the same time.

“Nazi racial propaganda might have played a role in the genesis of Superman,” created and published shortly before the outbreak of WWII, said panelist Esther Finder, president and founder of Generations of the Shoah — an organization based in Las Vegas.

Finder drew parallels between Moses as a baby being sent down the Nile river to save his life, and Superman as an infant being sent in a capsule to start a new life on Earth.

Finder believes that Superman creators Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, Cleveland teenagers in the mid-1930s, may have been aware of what was happening in the world at the time and were following Jewish tenets.

“Jews are taught do good for its own sake and to heal the world,” Finder said in another comparison, “which is what Superman ultimately tries to do.”

By contrast, the Nazi superhero is an amoral Aryan who uses his powers to destroy others, she said. The Aryan philosophy was survival of the fittest, with clear classifications of what groups are superior and which are inferior.

Igor Goldkind, a comic writer and author of “Is She Available?” said comics deal with how we as a species turn to art and expression as a way of coping and managing — and making sense of our suffering.

He warned about the future.

“The ideas that fueled this horrific episode in the 20th century are not ideas that have diminished,” he said. “These ideas still circulate.”

He also spoke of today’s Jewish humor — that it doesn’t come from the 18th century or 2,000 years ago.

“It comes from the Holocaust, because gallows humor is what people do to make sense of extreme suffering,” he said. “You make art and you make jokes and try to stay sane.”

After the panel, speaking in the hall, Goldkind told of historic parallels that he sees today. He said he is bothered by the way undocumented immigrants are labeled as “illegals.”

“You can’t dehumanize a person and say because you don’t have proper documentation, that makes you illegal,” he said. “To me that is a symptom, an echo of the same kind of dehumanization” of the Third Reich.

Sax shared her story at the beginning of the hourlong panel.

Sax saw Hitler once from her balcony window and by 11 was taken from her comfortable life as an only child in Czechoslovakia. Nazis stormed into her family home, seizing valuables and the family car.

By 1941, Sax would be taken by train to Theresienstadt, the first of three concentration camps were she was held from age 13 until 17. She was separated from her parents.

She worked in a munitions factory in Oederan in 1944-45 — but added sand to the guns, so they wouldn’t fire.

But Sax wasn’t part of the panel just to describe her past. She sought to promote knowledge of the horrific time in history and warn about the future.

Could it happen again?

“Absolutely,” she said after the panel. “Look what’s happening in Syria and Iraq. They’re killing children. We still have the Nazi party.”

“Look at our politicians. What do they do? Nothing.”

But she also spoke of hope.

As a child in the death camps, she said a prayer taught by her grandmother.

“People used to say, ‘Oh, you’re praying. Did God hear you?’ And I said, ‘God created such a beautiful world. Only people make it so miserable.’”

To pass the time, on Friday nights she and a group of girls would pretend that they were cooking or swimming. She also made jewelry for her mother and herself out of bullet pieces or bread combined with spit and any colors she could find on the ground.

She called herself living proof of how hope can pull a family through “one of the worst atrocities in the history of the world.”

“Yes, my mother, my father and I made it through the Holocaust, only to return to our bombed out city, where we were the only surviving family unit,” she said.

Sax said she wasn’t aware of Superman while interred. All communication was cut off.

“Maybe had I known about Superman, I might have had more hope and faith that I would be saved one day,” Sax said. “Although my prayers were answered, it took longer than I thought.”

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From: https://timesofsandiego.com/arts/2018/07/19/comic-con-panel-packed-for-holocaust-survivor-jewish-created-superman/

DC Comics receives a Guinness World Record for Action Comics

DC Comics definitely hit the ground running at San Diego Comic-Con. During its annual Press Breakfast, the publisher received the Guinness World Record for the longest-running superhero comic book series. The title that snagged the honor was none other than Action Comics — it recently celebrated issue #1000, which was a celebration of Superman’s 80th anniversary. 

The certificate was presented to DC publishers Jim Lee and Dan DiDio by a Guinness adjudicator. First published in 1938, Action Comics was the title that introduced Superman to the world. It has also introduced readers to several mainstays in the canon of Superman, including Lois Lane, Lex Luthor, Brainiac, Toyman, the bottled city of Kandor, and the Fortress of Solitude. 

Issue #1000 was a landmark 80-page issue, which featured the talents of Dan Jurgens, Jim Lee, Marv Wolfman, Louise Simonson, Tom King, and the DC debut of Brian Michael Bendis

“Action Comics and Superman laid the foundation of the superhero genre and are cornerstones of American pop culture history,” Michael Furnari, the official Guinness adjudicator, said, in a statement. “This Guinness World Records title is a fitting tribute to Action Comics‘ lasting impact on the superhero genre and comic books as a whole.” 

Here’s to the next 1000 issues, which begins with #1001 — it is written by Bendis, with artwork by Patrick Gleason. 

Can’t make it to San Diego for all of the Comic-Con excitement? SYFY WIRE has you covered. Click here for SYFY WIRE’s full coverage of SDCC 2018, including up-to-the-minute news, exclusive interviews, and videos.

From: http://www.syfy.com/syfywire/dc-comics-guinness-world-record-action-comics

Henry Cavill Wants to Play Classic Comic Superman, Face-Off Against Brainiac

Henry Cavill may be on the press tour for his current film Mission: Impossible – Fallout, but his role as Superman in the DCEU is still a major topic of conversation, including what version of the iconic character he’d like to play and what villain he wants to face.

In a conversation with Fandom, Cavill was asked what villain he’d like to face off with as the Man of Steel and he wasted no time picking a fan-favorite: Brainiac.

“I think a great villain would be Brainiac. I think that would be a good villain to play against,” Cavill said. “Brainiac’s a big threat. There’s a lot of fun. There’s a lot of storylines to him.”

DC Comics villain certainly does have a lot of storylines which is, in part, what makes him so popular. Recently, Brainiac was featured in SYFY’s Superman prequel series Krypton with the villain seeking to add Krypton to his twisted collection well before the birth of Superman. With the villain’s small screen portrayal being well-received fans would be up him to appear on the big screen in the DCEU, too.

If the next Superman movie were to follow a classic comic book story, Brainiac could be a real possibility as the villain. It’s something that Cavill may have hinted about when talking about the kind of Superman he’d like to play next. The actor explained that he’s very interested in playing him as “the classic hero” as opposed to an evil Superman like Christopher Reeve played in Superman III.

“I would be very keen for the opportunity to play a classic comic Supes before playing evil,” he said. “In the comic books, there’s a lot of really, really good stories about being the classic hero — a real beacon of hope and a shining light for everyone to aspire towards — and it would be a lot of fun to play that version of Supes.”

This isn’t the first time Cavill has opened up about what he’d like to explore with Superman. He recently told Square Mile that he’d love to see 2004’s Superman: For Tomorrow adapted should there be a sequel to Man of Steel. Cavill described the story, which sees Superman try to find out what happened to a million people mysteriously wiped out of existence while also dealing with his own grief and guilt, as “one of my favourite comic books. I would definitely tell a story like that.”

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What do you think about Cavill’s Superman facing off with Brainiac? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Mission: Impossible – Fallout hits theaters on July 27, 2018.

From: http://comicbook.com/dc/2018/07/18/henry-cavill-wants-superman-brainaic-face-off-man-of-steel-/

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