Top Ten DC Comics Stories of 2017

Slide 1/10 – Adam West passes away
Adam-West-Batman

While contemporary portrayals of Batman in both film and television depict the Caped Crusader as being a dark, brooding character, the definitive small-screen Batman was a distinctively lighter character. Adam West’s portrayal of the iconic hero in the classic 1960s Batman television series gave the world The Bright Knight, a campy, humorous take on Batman that in turn made West himself an icon.

However, the world of Batman grew a little darker back in June when, after a short battle with leukemia, West died at age 88.

“Our dad always saw himself as The Bright Knight, and aspired to make a positive impact on his fans’ lives,” his family said in a statement when news broke of West’s passing. “He was and always will be our hero.”

West’s final performance as Batman, the animated Batman vs. Two-Face, was released in October.

From: http://comicbook.com/dc/2017/12/31/top-ten-dc-comics-stories-of-2017/

Exclusive DC Preview: ‘Superman’ #38 – Comicbook.com

DC has provided ComicBook.com with an exclusive preview of Superman #38, due out next week from writers Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason, and featuring art by Ed Benes, Sergio Fernandez Davila, Vicente Cifuentes, and Gabe Eltaeb.

The issue is the final part of the “Super-Sons of Tomorrow” storyline, which pits the Titans of Tomorrow against their younger counterparts in the Teen Titans with the life of Superboy Jonathan Kent hanging in the balance.

This is the first time fans have seen the Titans of Tomorrow — featuring Superman Conner Kent, Wonder Woman Cassie Sandsmark and Flash Bart Allen — since before Flashpoint rebooted the DC Universe in 2011.

“Super Sons of Tomorrow” picks up plot threads from Detective Comics and introduces the Batman of Tomorrow to the Super Sons, Damian Wayne (Robin) and Jonathan Kent (Superboy). The dark, adult version of Tim Drake has plans to do away with the Boy of Steel, claiming that his continued existence jeopardizes the future.


Superman (2016) #38

Superman (2016) #38

View Gallery

Can he be trusted, though, especially since we know this version of the character was profoundly affected by a different Superboy, Conner Kent?

The former Superboy’s erasure from continuity following the events of 2011’s The New 52 reboot will be addressed in-story within in the pages of Detective Comics, according to series writer James Tynion IV.

“Part of this story, where we started, was recognizing Tim Drake’s classic origin and realigning Tim to the original iteration of the character,” Tynion told ComicBook.com. “In resetting him back to his core, there’s one part of the core of the character that was not being addressed — that’s still missing. I knew that it would be false to bring back to core of the character and not point to the part of the core that’s missing. Using that as the piece that allows the future Tim Drake — the ‘Titans Tomorrow’ Tim Drake — to realize that this world has changed which means the future is no longer set and time can be changed, that’s what really propels us into the future. It leaves this powerful mystery dangling that Tim doesn’t know the answer to, but he knows it’s important. To see that one play out, you guys are going to have to read the comic books.”

The issue comes with a variant cover by Jorge Jimenez that pays macabre homage to The Adventures of Superman #498, the first issue of the “Funeral For a Friend” storyline, which featured Superman’s battered corpse on the cover, laying on cracked pavement following his battle with Doomsday.

You can see the preview pages in the attached image gallery, and the official solicitation text below.

“SUPER SONS OF TOMORROW” finale!

With no other choice left, the Batman of Tomorrow brings in the Titans of Tomorrow to take on today’s Teen Titans—as the life of Superman’s son hangs in the balance! See the return of future Superman Conner Kent, Wonder Woman Cassie Sandsmark and Bart Allen Flash in the final battle of this epic crossover.

From: http://comicbook.com/dc/2017/12/29/exclusive-dc-preview-superman-38/

How Could There Be a Superman Around at the Same Time as the Legion?

In Abandoned an’ Forsaked, we examine comic book stories and ideas that were not only abandoned, but also had the stories/plots specifically “overturned” by a later writer (as if they were a legal precedent). Today, we learn about a Superman Legion timeline mixup!

The Superman titles were always trying out new ideas during the 1950s and 1960s. That is how we ended up with Supergirl getting her own popular back-up feature. Much like Supergirl, a lot of these feature ideas revolved around the idea of taking a basic Superman concept and putting up a variation on the idea. One of these ideas was a popular back-up feature that re-occurred in a few different Superman-related titles in 1965-67 (Superman, Action Comics and World’s Finest Comics). It told the tale of the Superman of the 30th Century, who was a descendant of the modern day Superman.

Here he is in 2965 in Superman #181 (by Edmond Hamilton, Curt Swan and George Klein)….

In an interesting twist, this Superman is no longer vulnerable to kryptonite, but he IS vulnerable to the polluted water, so he can’t go into water.

So anyhow, it’s a fine, straightforward setup. So what was the problem?

Well, you might notice that, at the same time that these Superman comic books were coming out, DC was currently publishing ANOTHER comic book series that was ALSO based in the same exact timeline! The Legion of Super-Heroes feature was also set in the 30th Century.

Naturally, it did not make any sense for Superman to co-exist with the Legion. Why would they never run into him? Why would they even bother with using a time-traveling Superboy if they already had a new version of SUPERMAN running around? Obviously, what happened was that no one thought it was a big deal to have two different timelines set in the same time period. It was similar to how the Superman titles had their version of Atlanteans and the Aquaman books had their versions of Atlanteans. Neither worked with the other, but no one really cared. Until, of course, nitpicky comic book fans, in effect, MADE them care by both complaining about it and by having new writers who grew up on comic books and thus cared about this stuff just like the other comic book fans of the era.

Thus, when the future Superman character was reprinted in the back of 1971’s Superman #244, suddenly he is now the Superman of the 25th Century and not the 30th.

Retcon by way of editing! Very funny.

If anyone else has a suggestion for a notable comic book retcon that they’d like to see featured, drop me a line at brianc@cbr.com!

From: https://www.cbr.com/superman-legion-timeline-mixup/

Review – Superman: Action Comics #994: Can Superman Save Krypton?

Owner/Publisher, Editor-at-Large

Ken Denmead

Editor-in-Chief

Matt Blum

Managing Editor

Z

Senior Editors

Jonathan H. Liu, Jenny Bristol, Corrina Lawson, Patricia Vollmer

Gaming Editor

Dave Banks

Associate Publishers*

Tim Johnides, Jeff Williams, Dante Lauretta, Magnus Dahlsröm, Jayson Peters, David Michael, Gerry Tolbert, Andrew Smith, Ray Wehrs, Joel Becker, Scott Gaeta, Beth Kee, Joey Mills, talkie_tim, Danny Marquardt, Adam Bruski, John Bain, Bill Moore, Adam Frank, Lacey Hays, Peter Morson, James Needham, Matt Fleming, Adam Anderson, Jim Reynolds, Seiler Hagan, Bryan Wade, Petrov Neutrino, Jay Shapiro

Editor (Emeritus)

Chris Anderson

Core Contributors

Darren Blankenship, Rory Bristol, Robin Brooks, Preston Burt, Samantha Fisher, Ray Goldfield, Jamie Greene, Michael Harrison, Ryan Hiller, Rob Huddleston, Will James, James Floyd Kelly, Anthony Karcz, Michael Kaufman, Mordechai Luchins, Brad Moon, Tony Nunes, Anton Olsen, Jules Sherred, Mark Vorenkamp, Chris Wickersham, Simon Yule

Occasional Contributors

Tim Bailey, Natania BarronJohn Booth, Samantha Bryant, Stephen Clark, Tom Fassbender, Matt ForbeckMelissa Ford, Bernd Grobauer, Travis Hanson, Kishore Hari, Whit Honea, Sarah James, John Kovalic, Michael LeSauvage, Jim MacQuarrie, Joey Mills, Skip Owens, Ricardo Rebelo, Drew Rich, Andy Robertson, Mariana Ruiz, Derrick Schneider, Bill Shribman, Tony Sims, Randy Slavey, Gerry Tolbert, Michael Witwer

From: https://geekdad.com/2017/12/review-superman-action-comics-994/

Henry Cavill Sends Superman Challenge Coin To Comic Writer/Artist

Justice League star Henry Cavill’s tradition of giving out “challenge coins” continues and this time it’s not just the crew of films he’s working on receiving the thoughtful token.

Comic book writer and artist Tony Daniel took to Instagram today to share a photo of special token that the Superman actor had sent him. You can check it out below.

A gift I got in the mail today from @henrycavill. It’s pretty awesome! Henry designed the coin himself! I’d say he has some artistic skills! Thank you Henry! #henrycavill #Superman #JusticeLeague #DCComics

A post shared by Tony Daniel (@tonysdanielx) on Dec 18, 2017 at 10:38am PST

The “challenge coin” is the same as one that he gave out to attendees of ACE Comic Con last weekend. The coins were prizes in a scavenger hunt of sorts where pieces of comic book art were hidden around the convention center and fans could turn them into Cavill and his team to receive a coin. Daniel, who did not attend the convention, did some sketches for Cavill’s treasure hunt and the coin was the actor’s way of thanking him.

For those unfamiliar, a challenge coin is a small coin or medallion with the emblem or insignia of an organization or group that is carried by the group’s members. Traditionally, the coins are given to prove membership in the group when someone is “challenged.” In military settings, challenge coins are presented by unit commanders for special achievements by members of the unit. Cavill has had a tradition of giving such coins to cast and crew on films he’s been in, including Man of Steel, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, and The Man from U.N.C.L.E.

The coin Cavill sent Daniel, as well as gave out at ACE was a special Superman coin that the actor himself designed. The coins he gave out for Batman v Superman were a little less elaborate, featuring one coin that was white with the Superman insignia and a second coin that was black with the Batman logo.

In addition to the special Superman challenge coin, Cavill also spoke with fans at ACE who asked how Clark Kent, who came back to life in Justice League, would manage to return to the rest of the world without blowing his cover. Cavill admitted that it would be a challenge, but it also required a little suspension of disbelief.

“It’s a tricky one,” Cavill said. “The wonderful thing about movies is that it’s a suspension of disbelief. We’re talking about a guy who can fly, who can shoot lasers out of his eyes. And so, there are ways of doing it but telling these stories, it’s about your enjoyment. It’s about my enjoyment. It’s about enjoyment for the viewer.

Justice League is in theaters now.

Justice League movie poster image

ComicBook Composite

61.35

All-Time Comic Movies #72

Your rating

All-Time Rated
#39

Average rating

3.74/5
from 129 users


Buy Tickets powered by Fandango

From: http://comicbook.com/dc/2017/12/19/henry-cavill-superman-challenge-coin/

As DC’s ‘Action Comics’ approaches 1,000 issues, a classic …

Dan Jurgens’ pencils have finally caught up to his writing. If only for a few issues, the Minnesotan has returned to drawing Superman for DC Comics, handling the illustrating duties on the cover and interior pages of the recent “Action Comics” No. 993 and No. 994.

Jurgens, known to a generation of DC Comics fans for writing and illustrating “The Death of Superman” (“Superman” No. 75) back in 1992, has been busy writing “Action Comics” for DC during its “Rebirth” era of publishing, which began in 2016.

Last summer, Jurgens said that “Action’s” twice-monthly publishing schedule didn’t leave him with any time to draw.

“I’ve wanted to get back to drawing an issue or two for quite some time,” Jurgens said. “It just so happened that we had an artistic opening in the schedule that dovetailed with a bit of an opening in mine, so I decided to go for it.”

Jurgens’ return to drawing Superman isn’t the only surprise for those who have picked up the most recent issue of “Action Comics.” Issue No. 993 also features DC’s popular time-traveling character Booster Gold (who shares the cover of the issue with Superman), a character Jurgens created more than 30 years ago, who is investigating Superman traveling to the past.

Jurgens recently shattered Superman’s world when he revealed the secret identity of Mr. Oz (a villain who has haunted Superman recently in “Action Comics”) to be someone extremely close to the hero. So close that Superman uses the Flash’s cosmic treadmill to go back in time to verify whether what he has learned can possibly be true.

Jurgens has drawn Superman in various ways over the years, including short- and long-haired versions as well as with an all-black suit in his return from death in the 90s. But he admits his muscle memory kept reverting him back to drawing Superman with red trunks, a look that was eliminated in DC’s less popular “New 52” era that began in 2011.

As “Action Comics” gets closer to an unprecedented 1,000th issue, Jurgens says he’s started working on the comic but still can’t offer any plot points just yet. “We have some major developments planned,” he said. “I was working on it just a couple of hours ago — something I think people will really like.”

As to whether the “Action Comics” post-1,000-issue world could feature more art from Jurgens in the future, he’s optimistic but also realistic. “It’s always a question of time. I’d love to be able to do more drawing, but at the same time, I don’t want to give up any of what I’m currently writing,” said Jurgens, who also writes “Batman Beyond” for DC. “Still, I’d really like to be able to sneak back to [drawing] when time allows.”

From: http://www.startribune.com/as-dc-s-action-comics-approaches-1-000-issues-a-classic-superman-artist-returns/465964143/

As Action Comics approaches 1000 issues, a classic Superman artist returns – Van Buren Press Argus

Dan Jurgens’ pencils have finally caught up to his writing.

If only for a few issues, Jurgens has returned to drawing Superman for DC Comics, handling the illustrating duties on the cover and interior pages of the recent “Action Comics” No. 993 and next week’s issue No. 994.

Jurgens, known to a generation of DC Comics fans for writing and illustrating “The Death of Superman” (Superman No. 75) back in 1992, has been busy writing “Action Comics” for DC during its “Rebirth” era of publishing, which began in 2016.

Last summer, Jurgens told The Washington Post that Action’s twice-monthly publishing schedule didn’t leave him with any time to draw.

“I’ve wanted to get back to drawing an issue or two for quite some time,” Jurgens said. “It just so happened that we had an artistic opening in the schedule that dovetailed with a bit of an opening in mine, so I decided to go for it.”

Jurgens’s return to drawing Superman isn’t the only surprise for those who have picked up the most recent issue of “Action Comics.” Issue No. 993 also features DC’s popular time-traveling character, Booster Gold (who shares the cover of the issue with Superman), a character Jurgens created more than 30 years ago, who is investigating Superman traveling to the past.

Jurgens recently shattered Superman’s world when he revealed the secret identity of Mr. Oz (a villain who has haunted Superman recently in Action Comics) to be someone extremely close to the hero. So close that Superman uses the Flash’s cosmic treadmill to go back in time to verify whether what he has learned can possibly be true.

The treadmill plot twist allowed Jurgens to add one more classic DC hero to his artistic return: the Flash, who is none-too-happy to see Booster Gold anywhere near his time-traveling device, located in the Justice League’s watchtower in space.

“I’ve always enjoyed drawing Flash, even though I haven’t done a lot of it,” Jurgens said. “There is so much kinetic energy the character carries that he really brings life to the page.”

Jurgens has drawn Superman in various ways over the years, including short- and long-haired versions as well as with an all-black suit in his return from death in the 90s. But he admits his muscle memory kept reverting him back to drawing Superman with red trunks, a look that was eliminated in DC’s less popular “New 52” era that began in 2011.

The trunks “were there from time to time. Especially at the beginning,” Jurgens said. “Mostly in the doodled advance sketches I do for each page. I think Superman requires a certain kind of sensibility in the approach, one that conveys a certain sense of integrity and control on his part, so that stayed the same (artistically). But I think aspects of my style have changed since I would have last drawn him, and it feels to me like some of that is evident on the page.”

As Action Comics gets closer to an unprecedented 1,000th issue, Jurgens says he’s already started working on the comic but still can’t offer any plot points just yet.

“We have some major developments planned,” Jurgens said. “I was working on it just a couple of hours ago — something I think people will really like.”

As to whether the Action Comics post-1,000-issue world could feature more art from Jurgens in the future, he’s optimistic but also realistic.

“It’s always a question of time. I’d love to be able to do more drawing, but at the same time, I don’t want to give up any of what I’m currently writing,” said Jurgens, who also writes Batman Beyond for DC. “Still, I’d really like to be able to sneak back to (drawing) when time allows.”

David Betancourt writes about all aspects of comic book culture for The Post’s Comic Riffs blog.

From: http://www.pressargus.com/entertainmentlife/20171224/as-action-comics-approaches-1000-issues-classic-superman-artist-returns

As DC’s ‘Action Comics’ approaches 1000 issues, a classic Superman artist returns

Writer/artist Dan Jurgens is once again drawing Superman in the page of DC’s “Action Comics.” (DC Entertainment)

Dan Jurgens’s pencils have finally caught up to his writing.

If only for a few issues, Jurgens has returned to drawing Superman for DC Comics, handling the illustrating duties on the cover and interior pages of last week’s “Action Comics” No. 993 and next week’s issue No. 994.

Jurgens, known to a generation of DC Comics fans for writing and illustrating “The Death of Superman” (“Superman” No. 75) back in 1992, has been busy writing “Action Comics” for DC during its “Rebirth” era of publishing, which began in 2016.

Last summer, Jurgens told The Washington Post’s Comic Riffs that “Action’s” twice-monthly publishing schedule didn’t leave him with any time to draw.

“I’ve wanted to get back to drawing an issue or two for quite some time,” Jurgens said. “It just so happened that we had an artistic opening in the schedule that dovetailed with a bit of an opening in mine, so I decided to go for it.”

Jurgens’s return to drawing Superman isn’t the only surprise for those who have picked up the most recent issue of “Action Comics.” Issue No. 993 also features DC’s popular time-traveling character Booster Gold (who shares the cover of the issue with Superman), a character Jurgens created over 30 years ago, who is investigating Superman traveling to the past.

Jurgens recently shattered Superman’s world when he revealed the secret identity of Mr. Oz (a villain who has haunted Superman recently in “Action Comics”) to be someone extremely close to the hero. So close that Superman uses the Flash’s cosmic treadmill to go back in time to verify whether what he has learned can possibly be true.

The treadmill plot twist allowed Jurgens to add one more classic DC hero to his artistic return: the Flash, who is none-too-happy to see Booster Gold anywhere near his time-traveling device, located in the Justice League’s watchtower in space.

“I’ve always enjoyed drawing Flash, even though I haven’t done a lot of it,” Jurgens said. “There is so much kinetic energy the character carries that he really brings life to the page.”

Jurgens has drawn Superman in various ways over the years, including short- and long-haired versions as well as with an all-black suit in his return from death in the 90s. But he admits his muscle memory kept reverting him back to drawing Superman with red trunks, a look that was eliminated in DC’s less popular “New 52” era that began in 2011.

The trunks “were there from time to time. Especially at the beginning,” Jurgens said. “Mostly in the doodled advance sketches I do for each page. I think Superman requires a certain kind of sensibility in the approach, one that conveys a certain sense of integrity and control on his part, so that stayed the same [artistically]. But I think aspects of my style have changed since I would have last drawn him, and it feels to me like some of that is evident on the page.”

As “Action Comics” gets closer to an unprecedented 1,000th issue, Jurgens says he’s already started working on the comic but still can’t offer any plot points just yet.

“We have some major developments planned,” Jurgens said. “I was working on it just a couple of hours ago — something I think people will really like.”

As to whether the “Action Comics” post-1,000-issue world could feature more art from Jurgens in the future, he’s optimistic but also realistic.

“It’s always a question of time. I’d love to be able to do more drawing, but at the same time, I don’t want to give up any of what I’m currently writing,” said Jurgens, who also writes “Batman Beyond” for DC. “Still, I’d really like to be able to sneak back to [drawing] when time allows.”


(DC Entertainment)
(DC Entertainment)


(DC Entertainment)
(DC Entertainment)

Read more:

Here’s why it’s a big deal that comics star Brian Michael Bendis jumped from Marvel to DC

DC Comics’ ‘Dark Nights: Metal’ kicks off with an unexpected Vertigo Comics surprise

From: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/comic-riffs/wp/2017/12/20/as-dcs-action-comics-approaches-1000-issues-a-classic-superman-artist-returns/

Batman and Superman’s costume-swap double date is the best …

Batman #37 is about Batman and Superman taking their significant others on a double date. Batman #37 is also about them doing that in each other’s costumes.

This week’s issue of Batman is also about two old friends and two new ones, examining the uncertainty of commitment and the absurdity of love.

Batman #37 is a funny, human story featuring some of the world’s most famous characters. It’s a love letter to Batman and Catwoman and Superman and Lois Lane being in love. You should read it.

The pitch

The only outing that Batman and Superman and Catwoman and Lois Lane can to agree to visit is the Gotham County fair, only to find that it’s “Superhero Night” and nobody gets in unless they’re dressed as a superhero.

Of course, if they dress as themselves, they’ll look like the real thing. And so: costume swap. Lois puts on Catwoman’s outfit, and Catwoman gets in via … persuasion. That’s the setup, and it’s good.

Catwoman and Lois Lane sip a flask and talk about their pasts until they collapse giggling. Batman and Catwoman behave most untowardly in the Tunnel of Love. Batman and Superman agree that the pitching machines at the batting cages are far too easy, but then devolve into an argument over whether Batman could get a hit off of a Superman pitch.

At one point, this happens:


At another, there is this exchange:


The hit

Batman and Catwoman have recently gotten engaged. For normal people, this is the sort of time when a newly engaged dude would want to introduce his fiancée to his best friend and his best friend’s wife, if he hadn’t done so already.

But, as Superman says, “We don’t live normal lives. It can be … it’s really hard to do normal things,” a clear allusion to the issue as a whole.

Superman is surprised that Batman could find it in himself to do something as normal as getting engaged. He wants to know what pushed his friend, the self-flagellating, emotionally-closed-off loner, into opening up to someone.

Batman answers by talking about his parents (typical), and how their early deaths meant that he never fully knew them — or their relationship — not as an adult does. That’s left him without a roadmap for any kind of normal romantic relationship, and a life that’s also uniquely unsuited to them.

“I’m in the dark,” he tells his friend.

“You do all right in the dark,” Superman answers.

Here’s where I remind you that they say all of this while Batman is wearing Superman’s costume and Superman is wearing the Batsuit with his Clark Kent glasses over the mask and they’re surrounded by civilians in DC superhero cosplay and they’re both casually eating ice cream cones.

The home run

Batman #37 is just the latest installment of Tom King’s run on the series, in which he’s taken Batman through plenty of action and mystery and adventure. But it’s all in the service of examining whether a character who’s been seen through the lens of his trauma for so long can convincingly be transformed into a happier, healthier version of himself.

(It’s also the Batman run where Kite-Man becomes a big deal, which gets a reference in Batman #37.)

But #37 stands perfectly well on its own, a joyfully sincere story about friendship, love and how infrequently we take satisfaction in the normal. I’ve only put a couple of them in here, but there’s barely a page or even a panel without something delightful in it, thanks in no small part to Clay Mann’s carefully composed facial expressions.

Go on. Read it. Especially if you want to know if Batman can hit a baseball pitched by Superman, because I’m not going to spoil the ending.

From: https://www.polygon.com/comics/2017/12/21/16803044/superman-batman-comic-costume-swap-double-date

As DC’s ‘Action Comics’ approaches 1000 issues, a classic Superman artist returns – The Spokesman

Dan Jurgens’ pencils have finally caught up to his writing.

If only for a few issues, Jurgens has returned to drawing Superman for DC Comics, handling the illustrating duties on the cover and interior pages of last week’s “Action Comics” No. 993 and next week’s issue No. 994.

Jurgens, known to a generation of DC Comics fans for writing and illustrating “The Death of Superman” (“Superman” No. 75) back in 1992, has been busy writing “Action Comics” for DC during its “Rebirth” era of publishing, which began in 2016.

Last summer, Jurgens told The Washington Post that “Action’s” twice-monthly publishing schedule didn’t leave him with any time to draw.

“I’ve wanted to get back to drawing an issue or two for quite some time,” Jurgens said. “It just so happened that we had an artistic opening in the schedule that dovetailed with a bit of an opening in mine, so I decided to go for it.”

Jurgens’s return to drawing Superman isn’t the only surprise for those who have picked up the most recent issue of “Action Comics.” Issue No. 993 also features DC’s popular time-traveling character Booster Gold (who shares the cover of the issue with Superman), a character Jurgens created over 30 years ago, who is investigating Superman traveling to the past.

Jurgens recently shattered Superman’s world when he revealed the secret identity of Mr. Oz (a villain who has haunted Superman recently in “Action Comics”) to be someone extremely close to the hero. So close that Superman uses the Flash’s cosmic treadmill to go back in time to verify whether what he has learned can possibly be true.

The treadmill plot twist allowed Jurgens to add one more classic DC hero to his artistic return: the Flash, who is none-too-happy to see Booster Gold anywhere near his time-traveling device, located in the Justice League’s watchtower in space.

“I’ve always enjoyed drawing Flash, even though I haven’t done a lot of it,” Jurgens said. “There is so much kinetic energy the character carries that he really brings life to the page.”

Jurgens has drawn Superman in various ways over the years, including short- and long-haired versions as well as with an all-black suit in his return from death in the 90s. But he admits his muscle memory kept reverting him back to drawing Superman with red trunks, a look that was eliminated in DC’s less popular “New 52” era that began in 2011.

The trunks “were there from time to time. Especially at the beginning,” Jurgens said. “Mostly in the doodled advance sketches I do for each page. I think Superman requires a certain kind of sensibility in the approach, one that conveys a certain sense of integrity and control on his part, so that stayed the same (artistically). But I think aspects of my style have changed since I would have last drawn him, and it feels to me like some of that is evident on the page.”

As “Action Comics” gets closer to an unprecedented 1,000th issue, Jurgens says he’s already started working on the comic but still can’t offer any plot points just yet.

“We have some major developments planned,” Jurgens said. “I was working on it just a couple of hours ago – something I think people will really like.”

As to whether the “Action Comics” post-1,000-issue world could feature more art from Jurgens in the future, he’s optimistic but also realistic.

“It’s always a question of time. I’d love to be able to do more drawing, but at the same time, I don’t want to give up any of what I’m currently writing,” said Jurgens, who also writes “Batman Beyond” for DC. “Still, I’d really like to be able to sneak back to (drawing) when time allows.”

From: http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2017/dec/22/as-dcs-action-comics-approaches-1000-issues-a-clas/

Page 6 of 250« First...«456789»102030...Last »

Gallery

mini-title s-1955 ironons_set2_6 super_1024_10 Lois1 mxy19 sm-b smb sm_head_50x50 supes_fl5 superbg Superman-Movie-Collection2

Popular Posts

Archives